Memorial Day Open Thread - Niedermeyer's Dead Horse

Always remember.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:04 AM




Comments

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1 May God continue to bless all who have served, and these United States.

Posted by: anon a mouse at May 25, 2015 09:06 AM (C9pBZ)

2 Helluva picture.

Posted by: HH at May 25, 2015 09:06 AM (Ce4DF)

3 God bless the soldier active and retired.

Posted by: Kreplach at May 25, 2015 09:07 AM (EWctj)

4 lurking today

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at May 25, 2015 09:07 AM (GpgJl)

5 Lurking (and cooking) today. Yay!

Posted by: anon a mouse at May 25, 2015 09:09 AM (C9pBZ)

6 Working a half day today.

Posted by: Grump928(c) at May 25, 2015 09:10 AM (evdj2)

7 Reagan, Memorial Day, 1985
https://youtu.be/rhL9FdKeiRY

Another
https://youtu.be/IzUU-hdtxv8

Posted by: mindful webworker - remember at May 25, 2015 09:10 AM (uys7x)

8 Thank you to everyone who served.

Pet peeve, I hate photos like those above. I consider them drama queen-esque. I don't consider them moving. They are about the person making this big display of mourning.

Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:11 AM (nRvEn)

9 You know what that photo needs? More me.
- Preznit Selfie.

Posted by: PabloD at May 25, 2015 09:13 AM (cK0aF)

10 Oh, that is good. I've seen the photo before, but not with that caption.

Posted by: rickl at May 25, 2015 09:14 AM (sdi6R)

11 Let's not let Obama, McCain, and Lindsey Graham send any more soldiers off to die needlessly.

Posted by: W.C. Varones at May 25, 2015 09:15 AM (3EUeD)

12 Let's not let Obama, McCain, and Lindsey Graham send any more soldiers off to die needlessly.

Posted by: W.C. Varones at May 25, 2015 09:15 AM (3EUeD)

13 I used to work with a Marine Corp. vet. Once, before Memorial Day weekend, I thanked him for his service. He was a nice guy, but said, rather gruffly, "Memorial Day isn't about me or anybody else who is living. It's about those who didn't make it. Save your thanks for Veterans Day."

So in memory of those who died in service to our country - thank you.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at May 25, 2015 09:16 AM (+XMAD)

14
Carentan, O Carentan
by Louis Simpson

Trees in the old days used to stand
And shape a shady lane
Where lovers wandered hand in hand
Who came from Carentan.

This was the shining green canal
Where we came two by two
Walking at combat-interval
Such trees we never knew.

The day was early June, the ground
Was soft and bright with dew
Far away the guns did sound,
But here the sky was blue.

The sky was blue, but there a smoke
Hung still above the sea
Where the ships together spoke
To towns we could not see.

Could you have seen us through a glass
You would have said a walk
Of farmers out to turn the grass,
Each with his own hay-fork.

The watchers in their leopard suits
Waited til it was time,
And aimed between the belt and boot
And let the barrel climb.

I must lie down at once, there is
A hammer at my knee.
And call it death or cowardice,
Don't count again on me.

Everything's all right, Mother,
Everyone gets the same
At one time or another.
It's all in the game.

I never strolled, nor ever shall,
Down such a leafy lane.
I never drank in a canal,
Nor ever shall again.

There is a whistling in the leaves
And it is not the wind,
The twigs are falling from the knives
That cut men to the ground.

Tell me, Master-Sergeant,
The way to turn and shoot.
But the Sergeant's silent
That taught me how to do it.

O Captain, show us quickly
Our place upon the map.
But the Captain's sickly
And taking a long nap.

Lieutenant, what's my duty,
My place in the platoon?
He too's a sleeping beauty,
Charmed by that strange tune.

Carentan, O Carentan
Before we met with you
We never yet had lost a man
Or known what death could do.

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:17 AM (St6BJ)

15 Apologies. First Reagan speech link (#7) is a news report, not the speech. Still, the brief clips from Reagan are sadly prophetic.

1982 (poor-but-listenable audio)
https://youtu.be/DJENf06b5eU

Posted by: mindful webworker - remember at May 25, 2015 09:21 AM (uys7x)

16
Vergissmeinnicht
Keith Douglas
1920-1944

Three weeks gone and the combatants gone
returning over the nightmare ground
we found the place again, and found
the soldier sprawling in the sun.

The frowning barrel of his gun
overshadowing. As we came on
that day, he hit my tank with one
like the entry of a demon.

Look. Here in the gunpit spoil
the dishonoured picture of his girl
who has put: Steffi. Vergissmeinnicht.
in a copyboook gothic script.

We see him almost with content,
abased, and seeming to have paid
and mocked at by his own equipment
that's hard and good when he's decayed.

But she would weep to see today
how on his skin the swart flies move;
the dust upon the paper eye
and the burst stomach like a cave.

For here the lover and killer are mingled
who had one body and one heart.
And death who had the soldier singled
has done the lover mortal hurt.

(Capt. Keith Douglas, UK, was killed in action by mortar fire while advancing from Bayeux, 6/9/44)

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:23 AM (St6BJ)

17


(Son to Father. . .)
Do not call me, father. Do not seek me.
Do not call me. Do not wish me back.
We're on a route uncharted, fire and blood erase
our track.

On we fly on wings of thunder, never more to
sheathe our swords.
All of us in battle fallen - not to be brought back by
words.

Will there be a rendezvous? I know not. I only know
we still must fight.
We are sand grains in infinity, never to meet.
nevermore to see light.

(Father to Son . . .)
Farewell, then my son. Farewell then my conscience.
Farewell my youth, my solace, my one and my only.

Let this farewell be the end of the story,
A solitude vast in which none is more lonely,
In which you remained barred forever
From light, from air, with your death pains untold.
Untold and unsoothed, never to be resurrected.
Forever and ever an 18 year old.

Farewell then.
No trains ever come from those regions,
Unscheduled and scheduled.
No aeroplanes flythere.

Farewell then my son,
For no miracles happen, as in this world
Dreams do not come true.

Farewell.
I will dream of you still as a baby,
Treading the earth with little strong toes,
The earth where already so many lie buried.

This song to my son, then, is come to its close.

(Extract from a poem by Jr. Lt. Vladimir Pavlovich Antokolski. Killed in action, June 6th, 1942)


Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:24 AM (St6BJ)

18 Was Louis Simpson the poet that was in the French Foreign Legion?

Posted by: steevy at May 25, 2015 09:26 AM (mGBKM)

19 ...It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us. . .that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion. . . that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain. . . that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom. . . and that government of the people. . .by the people. . .for the people. . . shall not perish from the earth.

Posted by: Pro Patria at May 25, 2015 09:26 AM (sIXA8)

20 Donna &&&&&, ..... thank you, ma'am. You get it.

I'd posted the following in WeirdDave's Memorial Day post, from yesterday, due to all the good folks "thanking all who served", etc.

The intention is appreciated, but the appreciation is misdirected.

"I do want to take just a moment, and provide what might be a bit of unwelcome focus here.

There are no shortage of Vets amongst Teh Horde. And indeed, we all honor the vets and active duty out in the wider world.

Today, is not about us, or about them.

So, while we vets humbly acknowledge the thanks of those who speak their appreciation in our direction, I, and we, must decline your honors, and turn towards they who deserve our woefully insufficient thanks, praise and honors.

This day is about the fallen. It is dedicated to those who are no longer with us. It is, Memorial Day.

It is, to Absent Friends.

Of whom I adjure you all to again, rise, and join me in this toast to them.


*Cheers!*

*slams shot*

*hurls yet another glass into the fireplace*"



Well, that was last night, and it's a bit early to resume the drinkin'. So, my cuppa coffee raised slightly, but with no less love and respect to the fallen.

From a quiet, sun dappled porch, contemplating this day over a mild cigar and rich, flavorful coffee, which which I salute; friends. We miss you.



Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Posted by: Jim at May 25, 2015 09:26 AM (RzZOc)

21 "HAVE you news of my boy Jack? "

Not this tide.

"When d'you think that he'll come back?"

Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.


"Has any one else had word of him?"

Not this tide.

For what is sunk will hardly swim,

Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.




"Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?"

None this tide,

Nor any tide,

Except he did not shame his kind---

Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.


Then hold your head up all the more,

This tide,

And every tide;

Because he was the son you bore,

And gave to that wind blowing and that tide.



John "Jack" Kipling, Irish Guards, Battle of Loos, 1915
by his father.





Posted by: Stringer Davis at May 25, 2015 09:28 AM (xq1UY)

22 Those are good, J.J.

OK, off to the local Memorial Day ceremony.

Posted by: rickl at May 25, 2015 09:29 AM (sdi6R)

23 8 Pet peeve, I hate photos like those above. I consider them drama queen-esque. I don't consider them moving. They are about the person making this big display of mourning.
Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:11 AM (nRvEn)

People handle grief differently.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 25, 2015 09:29 AM (RUCKm)

24 I really don't have the proper words perhaps for this day.

What's to say to those that fight today, fought yesterday. fought for our right to a country above all others in a amazing idea of freedom to excel and be freer than other countries in existence .

to those present still, to those that lost parts of themselves , to those that are no more, but had the strength and honor , courage and enduring hopes for the country...
Thank you, What was given cannot ever be properly addressed or the sacrifices you made your giving of yourself will never be forgotten.

and thank you to the families of those that fought, your sacrifices in assisting your soldiers to assist our country is also noted.

Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:29 AM (nqBYe)

25 18 Was Louis Simpson the poet that was in the French Foreign Legion?
Posted by: steevy at May 25, 2015 09:26 AM (mGBKM)

I don't think so. From Wiki:

"During World War II, from 1943 to 1945 he was a member of the elite 101st Airborne Division and would fight in France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany. Louis was a runner for the company captain, which involved transporting orders from company headquarters to officers on the front line. His company was involved in a very bloody battle with German forces on the west bank of what is now the Carentan France Marina - Simpson wrote his poem "Carentan" about the experience of US troops being ambushed there. "

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:30 AM (St6BJ)

26
To the uncle I never knew, who's been with me every day of my life.

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:32 AM (St6BJ)

27 25 Now I am wracking my brain to remember the name of the guy I am thinking of...Ah,I remember the name of the poem!I'll post it in a bit.

Posted by: steevy at May 25, 2015 09:32 AM (mGBKM)

28 Here's a link.

http://www.bartleby.com/104/121.html

Posted by: steevy at May 25, 2015 09:33 AM (mGBKM)

29 23 8 Pet peeve, I hate photos like those above. I consider them drama queen-esque. I don't consider them moving. They are about the person making this big display of mourning.
Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:11 AM (nRvEn)

People handle grief differently.

I handle grief by hanging out at the cemetery trying to pick up hot single women.

Posted by: major major major major at May 25, 2015 09:33 AM (ikfOV)

30 bebe's boobs: "People handle grief differently."

Nice response.

Posted by: mindful webworker - remember at May 25, 2015 09:34 AM (uys7x)

31 grief is a terrible thing. it's hard to let go .
it is probably she is not posing in grief but someone came upon her grieving moment.

Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:34 AM (nqBYe)

32 http://livestream.com/nww2m/events/4013315 LIve Stream of the Memorial Day Commemoration at the National World War Two Museum

Posted by: Jeffrey Carter (@pointsnfigures) at May 25, 2015 09:34 AM (LnE5F)

33
The final episode of the BBC's "The World at War - Episode 26, Remember."

Aside from one minor reference at the end to the napalm girl from Vietnam (it was made in '73), it is a must see IMHO, especially today.

Lest we forget . . .

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:35 AM (St6BJ)

34 probable.

Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:35 AM (nqBYe)

35 Solemn, but happy Memorial Day.

Enjoy the day, but remember why you are able to.

For me, it's my dad - WWII veteran and hero, my cousin whose name is on The Wall, all of the young men and women from A-stan and Iraq, and dozens of heroes I served with.

Fair winds and following seas.

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 09:35 AM (BZAd3)

36
Oops. Here's the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0l7BaQS5tvc&index=26&list=PL3H6z037pboEKhZaLYS879YMuDG8mGuQI

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:35 AM (St6BJ)

37 I remember...and honor those sacrifices.

Posted by: Gmac- Pulling in feelers in preperation... at May 25, 2015 09:36 AM (4CRfK)

38 There was a photo on twitter which I cant find of a woman who placed a large blanket with images of her vet husband and her on this grave. She and a tiny baby are laying on the blanket.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 25, 2015 09:36 AM (iQIUe)

39 32 http://livestream.com/nww2m/events/4013315 LIve Stream of the Memorial Day Commemoration at the National World War Two Museum
Posted by: Jeffrey Carter (@pointsnfigures) at May 25, 2015 09:34 AM (LnE5F)


There leaving us faster and faster each day.

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:39 AM (St6BJ)

40 8 Pet peeve, I hate photos like those above. I consider them drama queen-esque. I don't consider them moving. They are about the person making this big display of mourning.
Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:11 AM (nRvEn)


My mother, of blessed memory, witnessed and went through hell on earth at Mathausen, the labor brigades and two death marches.

50 years later, on a trip to visit the Anne Frank house, she barely took two steps up those stairs and ran back outside, sobbing uncontrollably.

The point is, you would be surprised how seemingly strong people fall to pieces when dealing with loss.

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:44 AM (St6BJ)

41 Well said, LoneStarHeeb @ 35.

(Where did your dad serve?)

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 09:44 AM (KTXxI)

42 In Flanders Fields still gets me the most. That poem is a hundred years old now.

Posted by: lowandslow at May 25, 2015 09:45 AM (dItuC)

43 People handle grief differently.
Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 25, 2015 09:29 AM (RUCKm)

Yes, within limits. But, the whole ostentatious display, in my opinion, is wrong. "I'm going to grieve by creating this whole display of laying on a grave and having my picture taken" isn't right and it isn't healthy. People do all sorts of things different ways. Sometimes though they aren't right. This just reminds me of the story of the Pharisees who made sure everyone saw them giving.

Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:46 AM (nRvEn)

44 I know this is British, but more than a few Doughboys are still 'over there' in Flanders' Fields:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Posted by: Guy in Texas at May 25, 2015 09:47 AM (IzORu)

45

"Wait for Me"

Written by Konstantin Simonov, 1941

Read by Sir Laurence Olivier


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvlarBDkpho

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:49 AM (St6BJ)

46 "I know this is British"

Pretty sure he was a Canadian.

Posted by: lowandslow at May 25, 2015 09:49 AM (dItuC)

47
Wait for me, and I'll come back!
Wait with all you've got!
Wait, when dreary yellow rains
Tell you, you should not.
Wait when snow is falling fast,
Wait when summer's hot,
Wait when yesterdays are past,
Others are forgot.
Wait, when from that far-off place,
Letters don't arrive.
Wait, when those with whom you wait
Doubt if I'm alive.

Wait for me, and I'll come back!
Wait in patience yet
When they tell you off by heart
That you should forget.
Even when my dearest ones
Say that I am lost,
Even when my friends give up,
Sit and count the cost,
Drink a glass of bitter wine
To the fallen friend -
Wait! And do not drink with them!
Wait until the end!

Wait for me and I'll come back,
Dodging every fate!
"What a bit of luck!" they'll say,
Those that would not wait.
They will never understand
How amidst the strife,
By your waiting for me, dear,
You had saved my life.
Only you and I will know
How you got me through.
Simply - you knew how to wait -
No one else but you.


Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:50 AM (St6BJ)

48 But, the whole ostentatious display, in my opinion, is wrong.

Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:46 AM
________

Sometimes it's obvious, and I hate it, too. Most of the time, however, I don't know so I extend the benefit of the doubt.

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 09:51 AM (KTXxI)

49 God bless those who served, sacrificed and gave their lives to defend our country. And a pox on the worthless bastards who destroyed the country they sacrificed everything for.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at May 25, 2015 09:52 AM (DiZBp)

50 From Wikipedia:

"In Flanders Fields" is a war poem in the form of a rondeau, written during the First World War by Canadian physician Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae. He was inspired to write it on May 3, 1915, after presiding over the funeral of friend and fellow soldier Alexis Helmer, who died in the Second Battle of Ypres. According to legend, fellow soldiers retrieved the poem after McCrae, initially dissatisfied with his work, discarded it. "In Flanders Fields" was first published on December 8 of that year in the London-based magazine Punch.

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 09:54 AM (KTXxI)

51
To my friend Ricky Mattern, lost on 2 September 1967, leaving behind a young wife and small child.

Prior to his death, Ricky went to the Flight Surgeon Dr. Marvin Marchmann (Deceased) and told him he wasn't going to make it through the tour. Marvin informed him he would make it and simply fly and leave the rest to God.

After a couple of additional comments from Ricky, Marvin told the CO it was best to sent Ricky to Hawaii to meet his family and then return and complete the tour.

After sending a week with family, Ricky returned to Bien Hoa and within the month again mentioned his premonition to Dr. Marchmann.

Marvin again reiterated the sage advise, and shortly thereafter Ricky was killed in a horrific accident.

Although he knew there was absolutely no way to alter the course of history, Marvin carried this burden the balance of his life, dying of a heart attack on Valentines Day 2008.

Goodbye Ricky and Marvin, two great friends who left early.

Posted by: Doctor Fish at May 25, 2015 09:54 AM (P330y)

52 Perhaps you are over worrying , maybe that the grief is different than you would experience outwardly some are stoic, some lose their minds, many of us don't know how we will grieve at a huge loss until it happens.

a personal experince ..i had two sisters, and my best friend die in one year, i rode through 1st sister and best friend in silence and depressive episodes, the last sister i felt numb until i sat down after viewing and what started as a sob turned into a monstrous crying , wretching hiccuping ,snorting .

Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:55 AM (nqBYe)

53 (Where did your dad serve?)
Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 09:44 AM (KTXxI)

If you saw Band of Brothers, you basically saw my dad's involvement in the war. His combat involvement ended at the Battle of the Bulge when the unit he was in surrendered to the Germans. My dad and another guy decided they didn't want to spend the rest of the war as prisoners and they spent three days and three nights working their way through German lines to get back to U.S. lines. He froze his legs and spent the next several months in hospital in Britain and then finished out the war watching over German POWs.

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 09:55 AM (BZAd3)

54 alright, no idea why i shared, sorry for the thing.

going to go finish up the (daughters)childrens bedroom

peace .

Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:56 AM (nqBYe)

55 Here's an interesting Memorial Day choice by the History Channel:

"Texas Rising"


A miniseries concerning Sam Houston (Bill Paxton) and the dire days after the fall of the Alamo premiers tonight 9/8c.

Has some great actors, and it looks to be pissing off all the right progtardian critics.

You might want to check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at May 25, 2015 09:57 AM (KUa85)

56 "11
Let's not let Obama, McCain, and Lindsey Graham send any more soldiers off to die needlessly.

Posted by: W.C. Varones at May 25, 2015 09:15 AM (3EUeD)"

As Obama repeated the lesson of Vietnam, Democrats will not rest until they insure that all American soldiers who die will die in vain.


How many Americans died to take Ramadi? How many died to take Fallujah? And what they died for was all changed to nothing by one incompetent narcissist with a pen and a telephone.

You can honor the sacrifice of the dead today but the bitter fact is that the America they died for is gone. Dead as the Hittite empire. It is gone and it is not coming back. We did not lose it on a battlefield. We lost it because we were not vigilant enough to keep an evil and relentless enemy from killing it in the media, the schools and the voting booths.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at May 25, 2015 09:57 AM (QHgTq)

57 We did not lose it on a battlefield. We lost it because we were not vigilant enough to keep an evil and relentless enemy from killing it in the media, the schools and the voting booths.
Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at May 25, 2015 09:57 AM (QHgTq)

As heartbreaking it is to say, you're right. This, I believe is the arrogance of power that comes from the decoupling of politics (government) from the people. It's been going on for a very long time, but it is much worse now and picking up speed.

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 10:02 AM (BZAd3)

58 *Cheers!*



*slams shot*



*hurls yet another glass into the fireplace*"




Well, that was last night, and it's a bit early to resume the drinkin'


RINO!

Posted by: John Boehner at May 25, 2015 10:05 AM (87y4e)

59 50 years later, on a trip to visit the Anne Frank house, she barely took two steps up those stairs and ran back outside, sobbing uncontrollably.

The point is, you would be surprised how seemingly strong people fall to pieces when dealing with loss.

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 25, 2015 09:44 AM (St6BJ)

===========
Years ago, I was in Munich, catching the train to Dachau. I struck up a conversation with an elderly woman and her two adult sons. They were British but the woman was one of the last Kindertransport kids. When we got to Dachau we went our separate ways. However, about 10 minutes later, I could see her sons practically carrying her out b/c she was so distraught.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 25, 2015 10:06 AM (iQIUe)

60 The complaint presumes that the photo was staged, and by implication questions the sincerity of the grief of the widow, even comparing her to those who blew a trumpet when they put a penny in the poor box!

I still think BB's original response regarding people grieving differently was sufficient reply. I've seen this pic around before, with different caption and with none. That it has become meme and acquired captions does cheapen it a bit, perhaps. Says nothing about its authenticity.

It seems a bit intrusive to be a voyeur to such a display of grief, as if we had just come across her in the cemetery. Feels like deep hurt to me. She is not there for the thousandth time, ritually; this is fresh grief, ache of loss far from mitigated by time's passing. Her grief echoes that of the families of all those who this day honors.

My 2¢.

Posted by: mindful webworker - remember at May 25, 2015 10:09 AM (uys7x)

61 Wow, LoneStarHeeb.

One of my uncles watched over Italian POWs for a while. I think he was in England at the time.

He once told me what they did when Germans surrendered to them on the Continent. They had to be brought to the rear, but the unit couldn't be shorthanded so whoever was in charge would say "Hurry back." So as soon as they were out of sight, there'd be a few shots and the soldiers would rejoin the unit soon after. If there was any discussion, it went like this:

"What happened?"
"They ran, so we shot at them."
"Did you get them?"
"I don't know."
(End of discussion.)

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 10:09 AM (KTXxI)

62 "Every generation, Western civilization is invaded by barbarians - we call them 'children.'"

- Hannah Arendt


I sometimes think, on Memorial Day, that the noblest way we have of picking up the torch passed on to us by the fallen is to teach each new crop of barbarians the meaning of Civilization, and of sacrifice.

Especially when our institutions have given up on fulfilling that contract.

If we don't, who will? Thank you all for sharing your personal stories and remembrances, for they help to accomplish that end.

Posted by: Piercello at May 25, 2015 10:09 AM (QJCCx)

63 43 "I'm going to grieve by creating this whole display of laying on a grave and having my picture taken" isn't right and it isn't healthy. People do all sorts of things different ways. Sometimes though they aren't right. This just reminds me of the story of the Pharisees who made sure everyone saw them giving.
Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 0

1. You don't know she posed. This is entirely a story you made up in your mind

2. Way to judge. Hope you never experience a catastrophic loss & find out the hard way how full of truly rancid shit you are

woke up feeling lousy & now I'm rage stroking. I am out of here after saying Thank You to those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 25, 2015 10:11 AM (vUM1B)

64 now I'm rage stroking

Someone always has to be That Guy. It's like a rule of the Internet, or something.

Posted by: Grump928(c) at May 25, 2015 10:13 AM (evdj2)

65 This, I believe is the arrogance of power that comes
from the decoupling of politics (government) from the people. It's
been going on for a very long time, but it is much worse now and picking
up speed.
Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 10:02 AM


Really started with Korea and Truman, who, as an Army Captain in WWI (and supposedly a pretty damn brave one), ought to have known much better.

What is it about politics that makes the players shrug off the deaths of thousands of our soldiers (and, as a small footnote, the loss of incredible amounts of our money)? They act as if war is nothing more than a video game....

I guess the answer is: Congress and Choom Boy don't pay for military action. Not at all. They move anonymous bodies and paper around on a table, then go off to play golf or drink it up at parties.

We, on the other hand, pay for it all. We spend our loved ones, sometimes ourselves, and our money in wartime. All because lazy, self-centered, disconnected fools in Washington can play Big Shot.

Time for a new Constitutional amendment: if the Preznit or Congress declare war, they go first. And pay for necessary transport and equipment.

Posted by: MrScribbler at May 25, 2015 10:13 AM (P8YHq)

66 May we remember always and soon return to the country we once were. Honor and pride.

Posted by: Libra at May 25, 2015 10:14 AM (GblmV)

67 I remember when this photo first popped up and I dont remember it being staged. That is a real grieving woman.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 25, 2015 10:19 AM (iQIUe)

68 Good morning, all. Thanks for the thoughtful commentary.


My dad survived WWII. Many in his unit did not. Here is a bit from his diary

Feb. 16, 1944-

The "hot" beachhead suddenly became "hotter". Gerry hit with all the artillery he had at 0600 this morning. Our work here in CB** ran wild. All the CPs and batteries seemed to be shelled at once.

Brig CP and rear area quite heavily shelled. Chaplain Wallace, McDaniel, Pratt and Metz were all killed by a single round. Irony of fate. Three out of the first four killed in the battery were listed as noncombatants.

Gerry probed our line with inf. and tanks all day long. We fell back slightly in a few places but generally held. Knocked out about 25 tanks. Look for a big push tomorrow A.M.


/Ezy Dog Diary excerpted Feb. 16, 1944 on the Anzio beachhead



RIP and God Bless- Chaplain Wallace, McDaniel, Pratt and Meta, though I never knew you.



**CB = counterbattery

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at May 25, 2015 10:20 AM (mvenn)

69 Marine saluting the Rolling Thunder tribute:

http://tinyurl.com/l9zkrmp

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 10:20 AM (BZAd3)

70 May I inject a happy note? I've spent the last week in WV visiting The Heiress, Corrina928. She was barely a week old the first time I held her last Tuesday. Good baby, healthy and content. In less than five minutes I was her slave for what remains of my life. It's amazing how children can do that to you; wrapping you in their pheromone cloud, staring into your eyes and leaving you in a Yes-my-queen state. Children and grandchildren are the future. Raise them well.

Posted by: Grump928(c) at May 25, 2015 10:21 AM (evdj2)

71 Very moving 11 year boy's tribute to U.S. soldiers at Normandy:

http://tinyurl.com/ptjpl9m

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 10:23 AM (BZAd3)

72 43 People handle grief differently.
Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 25, 2015 09:29 AM (RUCKm)

Yes, within limits. But, the whole ostentatious display, in my opinion, is wrong. "I'm going to grieve by creating this whole display of laying on a grave and having my picture taken" isn't right and it isn't healthy. People do all sorts of things different ways. Sometimes though they aren't right. This just reminds me of the story of the Pharisees who made sure everyone saw them giving.
Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at May 25, 2015 09:46 AM (nRvEn)


This idea that there is a Miss Manners way of grieving strikes me as profoundly wrong and reeks of inexperience.

As an example-

I knew a guy in college who one day received a phone call -

both of his parents and his sister had been killed in an auto accident.

He simply sat on the floor and screamed and howled like a wounded animal for five or ten minutes before he could even speak or start crying.

He wasn't pretending. He wasn't trying to attract attention. This wasn't a "look at me" moment.

This was a human being locked in profound grief and loss.

I don't think any of us thought any less of him because he didn't maintain "proper decorum."

Posted by: naturalfake at May 25, 2015 10:24 AM (KUa85)

73 Children and grandchildren are the future. Raise them well.
Posted by: Grump928(c) at May 25, 2015 10:21 AM (evdj2)

Mazel tov!

Posted by: LoneStarHeeb at May 25, 2015 10:24 AM (BZAd3)

74 Nood

Posted by: Y-not at May 25, 2015 10:24 AM (RWGcK)

75 From
the photographer of that picture:


The photo -- widely published in newspapers -- showed a distraught Mary
McHugh lying on her stomach in front of the grave of her late fiance,
James Regan, who was killed in Iraq this February by a roadside bomb.
The picture was taken at Arlington National Cemetery during Memorial Day
weekend.

"She sat in front of the grave..., talking to the stone," wrote Moore,
who has been a photojournalist in Iraq and Afghanistan during the past
five years. "She spoke in broken sentences between sobs, gesturing with
her hands, sometimes pausing as if she was trying to explain, with so
much left needed to say. ...

"Clearly, she had not only loved him but truly admired him. When he
graduated from Duke, he decided to enlist in the Army to serve his
country. He chose not to be an officer, though he could have been,
because he didn't want to risk a desk job. Instead, he became an Army
Ranger and was sent twice to Aghanistan and Iraq -- an incredible four
deployments in just three years."

Moore concluded: "Some people feel the photo I took at the moment was
too intimate, too personal. Like many who have seen the picture, I felt
overwhelmed by her grief, and moved by the love she felt for her fallen
sweetheart.

"After so much time covering these wars, I have some difficult memories
and have seen some of the worst a person can see -- so much hatred and
rage, so much despair and sadness. All that destruction, so much
killing. And now, one beautiful and terribly sad spring afternoon
amongst the rows and rows of marble stones -- a young woman's lost
love."

Posted by: Aviator at May 25, 2015 10:26 AM (sQzB6)

76 "He once told me what they did when Germans
surrendered to them on the Continent. They had to be brought to the
rear, but the unit couldn't be shorthanded so whoever was in charge
would say "Hurry back." So as soon as they were out of sight, there'd be
a few shots and the soldiers would rejoin the unit soon after. If there
was any discussion, it went like this:



"What happened?"

"They ran, so we shot at them."

"Did you get them?"

"I don't know."

(End of discussion.)

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 10:09 AM (KTXxI)"

I read an account by an English man who had served as a Lieutenant during WW I. He served in a Scottish regiment until he was wounded and when he got out of the hospital he was assigned to an Irish regiment. He was astounded by the number of prisoners that were brought into the headquarters at the Irish regiment compared to the Scottish regiment. Apparently it was a common practice for the Scots to bayonet their prisoners and throw the bodies in a shell hole as soon as they were out of sight from their officers and NCOs. Then they would spend several hours smoking cigarettes and enjoying the freedom of not being closely supervised.


Now the Irish are certainly the equals of the Scots, if not their superiors in the love of indolence however at that time the Irish were almost all devout Catholics and killing helpless prisoners in order to dodge out from work for a few hours would definitely be considered a mortal sin which would condemn the person who did it to Hell forever. In a place where death was a very real and imminent prospect, keeping the prisoners alive while they walked back to headquarters was the choice they made.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at May 25, 2015 10:26 AM (QHgTq)

77 NotLoved ....

Perhaps it was the only way and place she could truly grieve, without the well meaning, yet common platitudes of loss and time.

and, maybe, he was the only one she could share her breaking heart with.

Posted by: cind at May 25, 2015 10:27 AM (nRbbW)

78 Posted by: willow at May 25, 2015 09:56 AM (nqBYe)

So sorry, willow.

We should not presume to judge the woman in the photograph. She might not have been aware the photo was being taken, or cared that much at that moment if it was.

I was "in control" when my mother died at home - until I walked in the living room when the funeral home people were carrying her body out on a stretcher. I saw that and ran outside screaming.

I did not do that because I was a "drama queen."

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at May 25, 2015 10:28 AM (+XMAD)

79 Grumpy 928,
It's blood of my blood and bone of my bone, its knowing that somewhere on this earth you will live forever.

Posted by: Fourth Horseman found my saddle at May 25, 2015 10:29 AM (baCne)

80 My GrandFather served on the USS Arizona, he threw out all the photos he took when he was on her, because everybody in the pictures were dead. He told us stories about the ship when we went to visit the ship in Hawaii. He was not happy with the Japanese tourists who were snapping away pictures. Your taking pictures of my dead friends, I was 8 and I am sad that I did not understand his anger.
He also took in a Chinese refugee who was tortured by the Japs, so he had some real hate for them. When my Grandmother had to do ironing they would have to have him leave the house because they used an iron on him.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 25, 2015 10:31 AM (CxEX+)

81 Now the Irish are certainly the equals of the Scots, if not their superiors in the love of indolence however at that time the Irish were almost all devout Catholics and killing helpless prisoners in order to dodge out from work for a few hours would definitely be considered a mortal sin which would condemn the person who did it to Hell forever.
Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at May 25, 2015 10:26 AM (QHgTq)

The Scots at the time were almost all devout Presbyterians and were (in the days before the welfare state corrupted them)a notably industrious people. They would have feared Hell as much as the Irish did.

So I find this story surprising.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at May 25, 2015 10:33 AM (+XMAD)

82 Greetings:

Back in the summer of the last '68, I was doing my military down in Texas which, besides the Bronx , is the place I'd most like to be form. For several months, I was assigned to the base's funeral detail. We would provide pallbearers and a rifle squad for those requesting military funerals in the local area.

Military-wise, it wasn't bad duty. On the days when we weren't scheduled for a funeral, we would spend several hours practicing our "drill and ceremonies" and a couple of more squaring away our uniforms and equipment. On funeral days, we would head out as early as necessary on q 44-passenger bus, often in civilian clothes or else fatigues with our first-class uniforms in tow. Often we would change into our duty uniforms at the funeral home, once in the casket display room, or on the bus itself.

It being Texas and the Viet Nam war being in full swing, we often had several funerals a week to perform. There was a certain spectrum from the World War graduates through the Viet Nam casualties. The former might involve a local veterans' group and an afterward BBQ or such. The latter were somewhat more emotionally raw as most of us were facing our own deployments in the near future.

Two funerals of the latter sort have stayed with me through the years. The first was of a young Private First Class who had been MIA for several months before his remains were recovered. I was on the pallbearer squad that day and when we went to lift that casket, it almost flew up in the air. There was so little of the young soldier left that we totally overestimated the weight we were lifting and almost looked decidedly unprofessional.

The other was that of a Negro Specialist 4th Class. I was in the rifle squad that day. In the rendering of military honors, there is a momentary pause between the end of the (21-gun) rifle salute and the beginning of the playing of "Taps". It is a moment of profound silence in most cases. During that moment, the soldier's mothergave out a yowl from the depths of her grief that so startled me that I almost dropped the rifle out of my hands. That yowl echoes within me still.

I'll readily admit that as a result of my experiences, I became much imbued with a sense of duty and respect to and for our fallen. Hopefully, this year, when our media do their reporting they will show some of the same and let "Taps" be played out in its entirety. It would be nice for a change.

Posted by: 11B40 at May 25, 2015 10:34 AM (evgyj)

83 All gave some.
Some gave all.
To each I give thanks.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 25, 2015 10:37 AM (R7HUj)

84 I liked how the British "Celebrated" the anniversary of WW1 with a poppy for every life lost, it was stunning to see the pictures. I really wish I could have seen it in person.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 25, 2015 10:41 AM (CxEX+)

85 When we got to Dachau we went our separate ways. However, about 10 minutes later, I could see her sons practically carrying her out b/c she was so distraught.
Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 25, 2015 10:06 AM (iQIUe)

As you saw, Dachau has a lot of photos of just some of the atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis. We took our children with us who were 8, 9, and 12. Was WAY too intense for them.

Posted by: DJ Jazzy Mel at May 25, 2015 10:43 AM (BLFGI)

86 What I find near universal is our lack of deference to authority. I have noticed a more servile attitude to leadership in some of my colleagues who are of more recent American vintage and it grates on my nerves. Don't talk tough, then pull your forelock at His Lordship!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 25, 2015 10:51 AM (jR7Wy)

87 Whoops, wrong thread! Sorry!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 25, 2015 10:51 AM (jR7Wy)

88 Obnoxious A-Hole @ 76 -

Wow.

For what it's worth, my same uncle told me about a photo he posed for after the war. A German woman wanted to take a picture of all these soldiers from different countries, and she wanted it just so, so she moved the people around. "You stand here" and "You move over there" while she'd physically grab him and an English guy and a French guy to position them for her shot. "And you moved that way a bit" she'd say to the Russian, just pointing him with no physical contact. (So much better the way he told it - "Kraut grabbed the Frog by the shoulder.") He said this woman was being "typical Kraut" by bossing everyone around but was obviously scared of the Russian, who went along with it all but didn't smile once.

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 10:55 AM (KTXxI)

89 Aviator, thanks for the photographer's statement!

Posted by: mindful webworker - remember at May 25, 2015 10:57 AM (uys7x)

90 ...this ice cream won't, ummm, eat itself, uhhh, you know.

Posted by: TEH WON at May 25, 2015 11:02 AM (8tqf1)

91 So I find this story surprising.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. at May 25, 2015 10:33 AM
________

To clarify what my uncle told me:

I think he was a squad leader, so he was the guy saying "Hurry back." What happened out of his sight could have been anything - his guys shooting the unarmed Germans, or maybe they really did make a run for it, or his guys told the prisoners to scram and fired a couple of shots in the air for show then said later that they ran, etc. The point was twofold: He needed his guys back as soon as possible, and he didn't want to know what happened back there.

The Americans in WWII had a war to fight, but the Britons in WWI had axes to grind. I could hear accounts of that war and be shocked without really being surprised.

Posted by: FireHorse at May 25, 2015 11:04 AM (KTXxI)

92 May God continue to bless this great nation.

Posted by: Taqyia2Me at May 25, 2015 11:13 AM (sJuKe)

93 http://helenafuneralhome.com/obituaries/hugh-a-ambrose-age-48-of-helena/

Hugh Ambrose, author of The Pacific, and son of Stephen Ambrose has passed away. He was an integral part of getting the Nationalww2museum.org off the ground.

Posted by: Jeffrey Carter (@pointsnfigures) at May 25, 2015 11:59 AM (LnE5F)

94 Ref #8.
Pet peeve, I hate photos like those above. I consider them drama queen-esque. I don't consider them moving. They are about the person making this big display of mourning.

I am pretty sure the woman crying on her loved one's grave could care less about making a display of anything. I lost a good friend in Afghanistan in 2009. He left behind a wife, a two-year old daughter and an unborn son. At the funeral his wife looked into his Colonel's eyes and asked why? No answer then, no answer now.

Posted by: DL at May 25, 2015 12:05 PM (X1OZx)

95 For our disloyal opposition, by Rudyard Kipling

Memories
1930

"The eradication of memories of the Great War. -SOCIALIST GOVERNMENT ORGAN

The Socialist Government speaks:THOUGH all the Dead were all forgot
And razed were every tomb,
The Worm-the Worm that dieth not
Compels Us to our doom.
Though all which once was England stands
Subservient to Our will,
The Dead of whom we washed Our hands,
They have observance still.

We laid no finger to Their load.
We multiplied Their woes.
We used Their dearly-opened road
To traffic with Their foes:
And yet to Them men turn their eyes,
To Them are vows renewed
Of Faith, Obedience, Sacrifice,
Honour and Fortitude!

Which things must perish. But Our hour
Comes not by staves or swords
So much as, subtly, through the power
Of small corroding words.
No need to make the plot more plain
By any open thrust;
But-see Their memory is slain
Long ere Their bones are dust!

Wisely, but yearly, filch some wreath-
Lay some proud rite aside-
And daily tarnish with Our breath
The ends for which They died.
Distract, deride, decry, confuse-
(Or-if it serves Us-pray!)
So presently We break the use
And meaning of Their day!



Posted by: SDN at May 25, 2015 12:25 PM (p/ktF)

96 Sgt. Michael T. Washington, 20, of Tacoma, Wash., killed June 14.
PFC Michael R. Patton, 19, of Fenton, Mo., killed June 14.
Lance Cpl. Layton B. Crass, 22, of Richmond, Ind., killed June 14.
PFC Dawid Pietrek, 24, of Bensenville, Ill., killed June 14.
Capt. Eric D. Terhune, 34, of Lexington, Ky., killed June 19.

Lance Cpl. Andrew F. Whitacre, 21, of Bryant, Ind., killed June 19.

Sgt. Matthew E. Mendoza, 24, of San Antonio, killed June 20.

Afghan interpreter Mohammad Abaid Dawary, killed June 20.

Navy Hospital Corpsman Dustin K. Burnett, 19, of Fort Mohave, Ariz., killed June 20.

Staff Sgt. Christopher D. Strickland, 25, of Labelle, Fla., killed June 25.

Lance Cpl. Ivan I. Wilson, 22, of Clearlake, Calif., killed July 21.

Lance Cpl. Jacob J. Toves, 27, of Grover Beach, Calif., killed Aug. 14.

Lance Cpl. Juan Lopez-Castaneda, 29, of Mesa, Ariz., killed Aug. 14.

Cpl. Anthony G. Mihalo, 23, of Naperville, Ill., killed Aug. 14.

Sgt. Jerome C. Bell Jr., 29, of Auburn, N.Y., killed Sept. 19.

Cpl. Jason A. Karella, 20, of Anchorage, Ala., killed Oct. 9.

Cpl. Adrian Robles, 21, of Scottsbluff, Neb., killed Oct. 22.

Lance Cpl. San Sim, 23, of Santa Ana, Calif., killed Oct. 22.

Army Specialist Deon L. Taylor, 30, of New York, killed Oct. 22.

Capt. Trevor J. Yurista, 32, of Pleasant Valley, N.Y., killed Oct. 27.

Posted by: beats27 at May 25, 2015 12:49 PM (V8L/P)

97 2nd Bn 7th Marines OEF 2008

Rest Easy Brothers

Posted by: beats27 at May 25, 2015 12:50 PM (V8L/P)

98 I can see where this cemetery picture might upset some people. I think the Democrats have it right for once. A picture of the press admiring the president while he's eating an ice cream cone is more in keeping with the proper way to observe Memorial Day

Posted by: ADK46er at May 25, 2015 12:51 PM (g2fGr)

99 May we all remember those who gave their lives for a nation based on freedom for all.

http://www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces/17672/OSCAR-C-GALLEGOS

OSCAR CONANDO GALLEGOS is honored on Panel 58E, Row 20 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Date of Birth: 10/19/1937 Date of Casualty: 5/11/1968 Home of Record: ALICE County of Record: JIM WELLS COUNTY State: TX Branch of Service: ARMY Rank: SSGT Casualty Province: THUA THIEN

Posted by: RGallegos at May 25, 2015 12:59 PM (iyI9Q)

100 http://nyti.ms/1Rh70SR

I thought she was this girl, who slept at the foot of her husband's coffin, pregnant. I am glad I saw these photos. Glad with overbrimming gratitude for our thin blue (camo) line, getting thinner every day. Actually, not a bad take from the NY Slimes.

Here is my music video, "Memorial Day", complete with footage from 1955 & 1968 when the crowds would line the streets of our town on May 30th (not some convenient Monday). https://youtu.be/DiXlakwHfhM

Posted by: Chris Cassone at May 25, 2015 03:03 PM (10drM)

101 The fellow who called this a photo of a "drama queen" is full of applesauce (to put it politely).

People grieve in their own way. She's a young woman whose boyfriend/husband has been torn from her. At that age and stage in life, everything is a traumatic deal. (And in fact the death of her boyfriend/husband/father of her unborn or future children IS a big deal).


You get some age and miles on you and it's a bit easier to roll with the punches. But I know some 80 plus year old widowers who visit their wife's grave at least once a week just to sit and talk with her. It eases the mind and assuages the grief, even though she sure as heck isn't going to answer.

So leave grieving people--of whatever age--alone. They have to figure out how they are going to deal with their loss in their own way--and cheap "drama queen" shots are uncalled for.

Posted by: Comanche Voter at May 25, 2015 05:26 PM (Sda6L)

102 #17:

J.J., that is a wonderful poem, but I'm fairly sure it's by Pavel Antokolski, not his son Vladimir "Vova." Pavel wrote it in 1943 to commemorate his son's fall in 1942 against invading Nazis.

There's not much on the web in English about this issue, but you can read it here in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavel_Antokolski

Posted by: Mitch at May 26, 2015 03:15 PM (4KOF2)

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