Sunday Morning Book Thread 05-24-2015: For The Rough Men Willling To Do Violence On Our Behalf [OregonMuse]


memorialday2.jpg

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.

Book Quote

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book.

-Author Unknown

Many of you will recognize that the title of this morning's book thread is from the quote by George Orwell, "people sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." This is a great quote, but alas, Orwell never said it. Here is an interesting account of how it probably came to be misattributed.


We Will Remember Them

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.
...
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Excerpt from For The Fallen by Robert Laurence Binyon (1869-1943)


War Novels

There's a number of "greatest war novels" lists available (for example, this one, and that one, and that one and that one in particular), and there are some great books on those lists, but I decided to pick just one novel for this Memorial Day, A Midnight Clear by William Wharton, which didn't make many of the lists. It just sounded interesting:

Set in the Ardennes Forest on Christmas Eve 1944, Sergeant Will Knott and five other GIs are ordered close to the German lines to establish an observation post in an abandoned chateau. Here they play at being soldiers in what seems to be complete isolation. That is, until the Germans begin revealing their whereabouts and leaving signs of their presence: a scarecrow, equipment the squad had dropped...and, strangest of all, a small fir tree hung with fruit, candles, and cardboard stars. Suddenly, Knott and the others must unravel these mysteries, learning as they do about themselves, about one another, and about the "enemy"

Wharton also wrote an account of his own WWII experiences, Shrapnel: A Memoir.


Military Fiction by Veterans

Thanks to Oldsailors Poet for telling me about this site here for military fiction written by actual veterans. Sales-based donations go to various veterans groups. How much and what veteran groups depends on the title. The link is to the "action and adventure" books, but there are many books and many genres represented.

Osama Bin Laden's Bookshelf

Of course, OBL's reading has been interrupted as of late, and he probably won't be getting back to it any time soon. But the content of his bookshelf has recently been declassified, and some of the titles are English language texts. Here are some of the highlights:

The 2030 Spike: Countdown to Global Catastrophe by Colin Mason.

Within 30 years, in the 2030 decade, six powerful 'drivers' will converge with unprecedented force in a statistical spike that could tear humanity apart and plunge the world into a new Dark Age. Depleted fuel supplies, massive population growth, poverty, global climate change, famine, growing water shortages and international lawlessness are on a crash course with potentially catastrophic consequences.

This sounds like that old time Population Bomb religion that nobody pays much attention to because we all know it's crap.

It's just another "crisis" pushed by the left in order to seize more power.

And speaking of steaming piles of crap, there's also America's "War on Terrorism" by Michel Chossudovsky. Get a load of this:

According to Chossudovsky, the “war on terrorism” is a complete fabrication based on the illusion that one man, Osama bin Laden, outwitted the $40 billion-a-year American intelligence apparatus. The “war on terrorism” is a war of conquest. Globalization is the final march to the “New World Order”, dominated by Wall Street and the U.S. military-industrial complex.

Yada, yada, yada... Actually, it might be kind of interesting to know what ol' OBL actually thought about this. Would it be closer to "This guy don't know nuthin'" or "Curses! I've been found out!"?

Black Box Voting: Ballot Tampering in the 21st Century by Bev Harris. Another conspiracy book, this one about voting machines. The bad guys: corporations. Of course, you already knew this.

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkins. This is the one written by an idiot who claims he was hired by "the NSA" and sent to third world countries to falsify economic statistics. Uh, actually what the NSA does is collect and analyze intelligence data, not send agents into the field, that's the CIA. Here's a pro tip for wannabe left-wing "hit men": if you're going to spin a tall tale, at least make your lies plausible.

Next, we have Bloodlines of the Illuminati by Fritz Springmeier.

Bloodlines of the Illuminati is a unique historical genealogical who's-doing-it book, rich in detail, providing a devastating exposé of the people and families who are THE movers and shakers of the United States and the entire world.

HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!

Christianity and Islam in Spain 756-1031 A.D. by C. R. Haines. First published in 1889, it's available for FREE on Kindle. I love these old history books, so I immediately downloaded it.

There's more stuff on the list from Chomsky and other progtard authors. I'm surprised there was nothing from Howard Zinn. About the only "mainstream" book I could find is The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers by Paul Kennedy.

One thing's for sure: OBL sure liked him some left-wing kookery.

Rush was all over this story last week. The coverage was pretty bland. I think Fox had a story on it, and the Daily Mail in the UK. And the LA Times piece goes a long way to avoid talking about the obvious, and describes the far left kook authors in OBL's collection with the anodyne phrase "government critics." Only the British piece refers to Chomsky as a "left-wing radical", which, of course, is exactly what he is.

Rush rightly calls the MSM out for the tepid coverage:

Can you imagine if they had found a copy of one of my books in there? Can you imagine? That would be the headline. But since there are books by a bunch of leftists in there, ho-hum, no big deal.

It's just a local crime story.


A Book About Stealing Books

An historical thriller that sounds like it's worth reading:

Writer Matthew Pearl is earning positive reviews for his new book “The Last Bookaneer,” with critics calling the novel “a loving testament to the enduring power of paper books” and Pearl himself “the reigning king of popular literary historical thrillers.”

Old criminals in a changing world:

“Bookaneer,” which was released on April 28, centers on the hunt for a manuscript by “Treasure Island” author Robert Louis Stevenson. “Bookaneers” like Pen Davenport make money by absconding with manuscripts, but now that new laws will put this trade to a halt, Davenport and others set out to complete one last theft: getting their hands on Stevenson’s unpublished book.

The Last Bookaneer is Kindle price high at $11.99 and I'll wait for the price to come down a bit.


Scorpions Are Our Friends

I never knew such animals existed.

Chelifer cancroides or book scorpions are a type of pseudoscorpion that eats the booklice that eat and destroy old books.

As a pseudoscorpion they are not real scorpions, but they do have pincers and live in dusty areas, especially those with old vintage books. They are too tiny to hurt humans and indeed are small enough you probably won’t notice them unless you are looking.

So, if you have old books, these tiny creatures are actually good to have around:

The book scorpion is a tiny creature that makes its home in your bookcase, but it is not a pest. If you are a book lover, the book scorpion is your greatest ally in keeping your library safe from destruction.


Marvelous

Stan Lee will soon be publishing his autobiography -- as a graphic novel:

Touchstone plans to publish Lee's "Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir" on Oct. 6.

I thought, hmmm, this might be interesting for comic book fans. But then he had to go and ruin it by opening his mouth:

“As Marvel just celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary, I thought maybe it’s time for a look at my life in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comicbook ... or if you prefer, a graphic memoir,” Lee said in a statement. “It strikes me as a horrendous oversight that I haven’t done it before! If I didn’t know everything about my life already, I’d envy your voyage of discovery!”

Ugh. I know Stan Lee is 92 years old and one of the most successful men in the world, but if he really is that full of himself, it kind of spoils fot me anything he has to say.

If I was impressed by men with incredibly over-inflated egos, I'd be watching Bill O'Reilly every night.


Books By Morons

I heard from several new moron authors this week.

Jeb Kinnison would like you to read his science fiction novel, Red Queen: The Substrate Wars 1

Red Queen is a story about young people searching for freedom and agency in a world dominated by bureaucrats, administrators, and propagandists. The world of Red Queen is a police state with its roots in today's events: post-9/11 warrantless physical and electronic surveillance; the erosion of personal liberties for supposed security reasons, even when the government's actions are shown to be ineffective or wrongheaded; and the rise of a penal-industrial complex that imprisons one in three black men, often for victimless crimes.

The prologue begins with a quote from Robert Heinlein, "There is nothing in this world so permanent as a temporary emergency."

The sequel to 'Red Queen' is Nemo’s World: The Substrate Wars 2


___________

I forgot to mention this last week, but the Kindle version of Amy Lynn: Golden Angel is now available for purchase for the reasonable price of 4.99


___________

OK, Smartass of Mars is probably worth buying for the title alone. Jim Gavin, the author, e-mailed this week and told me that

it's my scifi/fantasy homage to the sword-and-planet novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs and many others. However, I didn't just want to write another pulp pastiche so this one is set in the modern day and flouts a lot of genre conventions. I think AOSHQ readers would really like it as it's very old school despite the modern setting -- no badass princesses who don't need rescuing. I also managed to work in some references to CS Lewis' Space Trilogy... [it's] the story of a skinny milennial nerd who has to rediscover manly virtues to survive.

Trigger warnings for crazy action, cussing, laser guns and swords, a drunken riot in a Martian capital, and psychic powers.

Gavin is also the author of Hard Boiled Vampire Killers. I like the tag-line: "Fully loaded and half in the bag, fighting evil on two 99-cent tacos a day."


___________

Of course, for books you need to buy just for the title, it's hard to beat the Hard Luck Hank series by Steven Campbell. The first book, Screw The Galaxy, introduces us to the eponymous main character, a thug with a mutation that allows him to withstand extraordinary levels of physical trauma, kind of like the main character you manipulate in that old FPS game, DOOM. The sequels are Basketful of Crap and Prince of Suck.


___________

Jami Gold has written a full-length paranormal romance novel, Treasured Claim, is available on Kindle for just 99 cents. In her e-mail she told me:

Treasured Claim is a multi-award-winning contemporary fantasy romance--imagine dragons and swords and knights in contemporary Chicago...Desperate for treasure, a shapeshifting dragon resorts to thievery, but a knight steals her heart...

I like happy endings.


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Anna Puma's collection of short stories, The Princess Who Caused Fear, is available for FREE on Kindle for this weekend.

Thanks, Anna.


What I'm Reading

I'm about half-way through For Honor We Stand, the 2nd in author H. Paul Honsinger's Man of War military sci-fi series. I've read this series referred to as "Horatio Hornblower in space". and while I don't think it's quite that, nevertheless it is very fun to see Commander Max Robicheaux deal with the various challenges thrown his way, from trying to get his crew into shape, to clashing with the navy brass, to actually fighting the enemy, which ostensibly he was sent out to do.

Another thing I like about the series is that all the books, not just the first one, are reasonably priced. One of you morons complained last week about The Black Prism, and I feel your pain. TBP is a good book, which I've read a while back, and author Brent Weeks has developed an interesting system of magic based on the colors of the prism. But being the cheap bastard that I am, I'm not about to pay $10 to continue the series.

I look at it this way:

The pricing of the Black Prism series goes like this: 1. $1.99. 2. $9.99. 3. $8.99
The pricing of the Man of War series goes like this.: 1. $3.99. 3. $3.99. 3. $4.99

Seems to me that you'd get a lot more sales with the MoW pricing scheme than the TBP system, but maybe I'm wrong. All I know is that I'm going to finish out the MoW series, but not TBP.

Even if they priced MoW higher, say 1-2 bucks more for each book, that still would be more attractive then TBP


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Damn. About to see Stryker get killed in Sands Of Iwo Jima. Always make me sad.

Posted by: Cruzinator at May 24, 2015 09:03 AM (8cSVB)

2 Still working on the Elemental Masters series by Mercedes Lackey. When I get caught up will move on to Amy Lynn.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at May 24, 2015 09:06 AM (GpgJl)

3 I found a naval history of the United States by James Fenimore Cooper:

http://tinyurl.com/kksam64

I actually think it's more engaging than any of the man's fiction. He was a sailor himself and knew his stuff. Not exactly a fun read, but it's informative.

Posted by: David at May 24, 2015 09:06 AM (GkcHG)

4 That's Stan Lee's whole schtick. Equal parts bombast and self-deprecation.

Posted by: Jim Treacher at May 24, 2015 09:08 AM (aGaGt)

5 Finishing up Agnes Morley Cleaveland's "No Life for a Lady" - a 1941 memoir about growing up on a New Mexico ranch in the late 1800s. Very fine - and a very funny half-chapter about doing a critique of a western pulp romance written by a lady novelist who had never set foot on a western ranch, and a nice listing of the improbabilities therein.

Can't hang around the book thread this morning, though - off to downtown to give a personal tour of the Alamo and the more spectacular stretches of the expanded Riverwalk to a visiting member of the Chicagoboyz blog collective. We had a meet-up yesterday in Austin, which would have gone better but for torrential rain. It's very odd - to "know" people for years through blogging, and then to finally meet them face to face. As one might imagine, the conversation was lively and mostly erudite.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at May 24, 2015 09:10 AM (95iDF)

6 I didn't know 'A Midnight Clear' was a book. I've seen the film and really liked it. And if any of you watch the film, make sure to let the credits run and hear the song. It fits perfectly with the movie.

Posted by: HH at May 24, 2015 09:11 AM (Ce4DF)

7 Last three books I've read about our wars was Lone Survivor, House To House and My Men Are My Heroes. The men in these books were from Texas , Iowa and NY. It's just one of the things that makes me really love this Country.

Posted by: Cruzinator at May 24, 2015 09:13 AM (8cSVB)

8 William Wharton had a pretty good run with his first 3 novels:

"Birdy"

"A Midnight Clear"

"Dad"


All 3 of which are well worth reading.

Posted by: naturalfake at May 24, 2015 09:15 AM (KUa85)

9 I'm re-reading Wheel of Time. I know lots of people complain about this series, but it really is well done. And unlike GRR Martin, Jordan was able to have multiple plot lines and main characters and develop them all to satisfaction. It's funny because in the re-read I picked up a lot of stuff in the last few books that Sanderson had to finish that was set up really, really early on. So nutshell: I'm enjoying it all even more the second time around.

Posted by: Mandy P., lurking lurker who lurks at May 24, 2015 09:15 AM (KkVB6)

10 Thanks for all the work you put into the book threads OM.

On this Memorial Day weekend I stand in awe of those men who willingly put their lives on the line for the protection of their fellow humans. I am without words to express my respect.

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at May 24, 2015 09:16 AM (mvenn)

11 Reading Little Fuzzy again. I have been picking up spare copies in the last couple of years and passing them to co-workers at work who have school-age kids.

Not sure if it is working.


Willowed in the last thread, so who wants to read about socialism, civilization and the fall of the Roman Empire by Jesus Huerta de Soto?

http://tinyurl.com/socialism-decivilization

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 09:16 AM (t//F+)

12 Thanks for the rec of "The Last Bookaneer"

Reviews are such that it is catnip for librarians; my library already stocks it.

Also thanks for last week's rec of Simmons' "Flashback." Picked it up at the library.

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 09:16 AM (sEPMb)

13 YAY BOOK THREAD!

Personal challenge for the summer: keeping up with "real" work while getting my next book written and research done for the one after. Will keep the Horde appraised of progress on Loyal Valley: Captives--this one's got actual romance in it, so the trick will be making that element serve the plot and not vice versa.

Question for the Horde: if you had to pick one relatively short section of the Aeneid for young skulls full of mush to read, what would it be? (I'm using Dryden's translation because a) it's free on Project Gutenberg and b) they get two major poets for the price of one.) I say "relatively short" because it'll be the first week of class and because I'm having them read all of Hesiod's Theogony for the previous class session and don't want them burning out *too* badly.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 09:19 AM (iuQS7)

14 --I think I meant "apprised," not "appraised." Sorry. *iz a bear of very little brain*

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 09:21 AM (iuQS7)

15 And like clockwork I will again recommend Steven Pressfield's The Profession . It was a good book but not his best when I first read it but everyday that passes makes this book better and better. His grasp of what war and the world will like in the future is amazing.

Posted by: Cruzinator at May 24, 2015 09:23 AM (8cSVB)

16 I know Stan Lee is 92 years old and one of the most successful men in the world, but if he really is that full of himself, it kind of spoils fot me anything he has to say.

Aw, in Stan's defense, you might've missed the point here? Being full of himself is Lee's shtick. (Warning: Original Merry Marvel Marching Society member)

Bombast and self-promotion are Stan's thing, and have been since the earliest days of the Marvel age and his "Stan's Soapbox" columns. Someone said, of all the characters he's created and written for, "Stan Lee" is his best creation. Face of Marvel. Cameos in almost all the movies.

I think he knows he's "just" a comic book writer.

But I may be prejudiced. I've always liked Stan, especially for what he did for comic books, in my yout'. I always appreciated his P.T. Barnum barker act, too, theatrically and commercially.

Decades ago, Milady and I and our three kids were walking out of the Chicago ComiCon by a side door far from the action, just as Stan Lee was walking in. He was clearly on his way to something, but he stopped to chat with us briefly. Relaxed, funny. Quite personable, but, most assuredly Stan Lee. Definitely on my short list of "meetings with great men."

Posted by: mindful webworker - do wah ditty at May 24, 2015 09:23 AM (GWDdA)

17 This book will illustrate the Patriot Act in action
Extreme Prejudice: The Terrifying Story of the Patriot Act and the Cover Ups of 9/11 and Iraq
http://tinyurl.com/7zle92l

Posted by: Mr Wizard at May 24, 2015 09:24 AM (hCdMd)

18 Finished Michael Connelly's "The Burning Room." As always, Bosch is interesting, the plot twists are both surprising and plausible and his new partner is interesting in her own right.

Almost done Dennis Lehane's "World Gone By." (Joe Coughlin #3). Set in WWII Tampa underworld. I don't think anyone does the criminal world better than Lehane. To my taste, this is far the strongest of the three books. Can be read without reading the previous 2.

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 09:26 AM (sEPMb)

19 Elisabeth I have no idea. I liked Herodotus' Histories, I found him extremely readable and it runs into the discussion of various things as the peoples of the world, and the rise of Persian power and moving to the Persian invasion of Greece.

I also like Xenophon's Anabasis

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 09:27 AM (t//F+)

20 Stan Lee is also a left winger.

Posted by: steevy at May 24, 2015 09:27 AM (mGBKM)

21 I really enjoyed _The Alto Wore Tweed_.

I'm reading the third in the series now.

Very funny.

Residue, by Steve Diamond. Good, reading it to my teen now because I thought he'd like it and it's not wildly inappropriate.

Read Dave Barry's _The Worst Class Trip Ever_ to the kids. They really liked it. Nice mix of silliness and an interest plot. Not believable or anything, but fun.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 24, 2015 09:28 AM (0xTsz)

22 Oh.

I see Jim Treacher made my point about Stan Lee... in one concise sentence.

Must be time for webworker to go weblurker.

Posted by: mindful webworker - shh. reading. at May 24, 2015 09:28 AM (GWDdA)

23 This week I read Barack Obama and the Enemies Within by Trevor Lauden, a New Zealand political researcher and blogger. The book is a compilation of some of his posts from 2008-2011. It's repetitious and tedious at times, but a perusal of the book will show how three organizations, The Democratic Socialists of America, the Communist Party USA, and its Marxist off-shoot The Committees of Correspondence for Democracy played a major role in not only the political career of Barack Obama, but it almost all of the seventy-member Progressive Caucus in the House of Representatives.

The three organizations are particularly strong in Chicago politics, but are nationwide in impact. Many members of the media, union leaders, and liberal political foundations have ties to them. This book shows the interconnections between all of these.

Add to this the extent of the Muslim Brotherhood influence within this administration, and it explains why many of us have felt an unease that something was going on behind the scenes and that something was not right with it.

Finally, isn't it strange that if a Tea Party endorses some one, they are forever known as a Tea Party candidate or office holder; yet I don't remember ever hearing that a Democrat politician has been endorsed by any one of these organizations.

Posted by: Zoltan at May 24, 2015 09:28 AM (YPsdv)

24 Reading Rebel Yell by S.C. Gwynne. It is about Stonewall Jackson. If you liked his previous book, Empire of the Summer Moon, or you like books on the Civil War and Stonewall Jackson it is a good read.

Deciding whether to buy a Kindle to read through this Hugo voter packet.

Posted by: Achilles at May 24, 2015 09:29 AM (TpeIH)

25 can't recommend "A Midnight Clear enough" - what life must have been like during WWII - reminds me of my Dad RIP Lt.Col...Wharton's "Dad" is also great - gets a little dusty towards the end, though...

Posted by: geezer der mensch at May 24, 2015 09:30 AM (DE31Y)

26 Just about finished with another re-reading of the Dune books by Herbert. I'm missing only Heretics of Dune.

But I've discovered there is a whole series of Universe of Dune books, eighteen or more, and a School of Dune set. The reviews on Amazon are not encouraging. Anyone have any opinions.

The idea of a twenty book series on Dune is too close to David Weber's gazzion book set in Honor Harrington's universe.

I need something to take me away from current events.

Posted by: Alice van der Goggin at May 24, 2015 09:31 AM (MUYAH)

27 Kindltot, thanks for the recs. This assignment is my one lesson on uniquely Roman mythology for my World Lit mythology unit; otherwise, I'd give Herodotus and Xenophon serious consideration. (I'm calling the unit "Myths and the Myth Made Fact"--one lesson each on Greek, Roman, Teutonic, Irish, and American Indian, all as a lead-in to The Dream of the Rood and Der Heliand.)

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 09:36 AM (iuQS7)

28 How can we have a topic for today of military books and not mention one of the best authors of such, W.E.B. Griffin.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at May 24, 2015 09:37 AM (GpgJl)

29 War novel authors: Alistair Maclean, Bernard Cornwell, Martin Caiden, Len Deighton, and Robb White - hard to beat them. Welcome to my youth.

Posted by: goatexchange at May 24, 2015 09:38 AM (uBTYu)

30 I would also recommend Pressfield's Tides Of War about the Peloponnseian War. It really documents how the public goes wavy in their support during war. It also has one of my favorite excerpts which can be used to describe the difference between Conservatives and Liberals though he was describing the difference between Sparta and Athens. Spartans are courageous while Athenians are bold.......

Posted by: Cruzinator at May 24, 2015 09:38 AM (8cSVB)

31 The rec for Smartass of Mars reminds me of John Moore's fantasy (e.g. Heroics for Beginners). Fun, and has a lot of fun with the genre.

Posted by: Nazdar at May 24, 2015 09:38 AM (i436k)

32 26 The stuff written by his son is terrible.

Posted by: steevy at May 24, 2015 09:39 AM (mGBKM)

33 Really the first 3 are the only one's I like.God Emperor was okay,Heretics I didn't care for.

Posted by: steevy at May 24, 2015 09:40 AM (mGBKM)

34 OBL read the Left so he would know how to talk to them in their own language.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at May 24, 2015 09:40 AM (oVJmc)

35 Catch 22
As for VietNam let's remember just how popular it was, only 1-2% asked for a 2nd tour. When the NVA marched south they were saying victory or death, Americans were counting the days to go home.

Posted by: righter at May 24, 2015 09:41 AM (r6HrP)

36 13 ... Elizabeth, My memory of the Aeneid is decades old so take this for what it's worth. I would go with the opening as it deals with Troy and the Trojan horse (I presume they have at least heard of that), provides the need and motivation for his journey, and introduces the interference and influence of the gods. That last might work in with the Theogony the class just finished.

Damn, now I have to find my Dryden translation.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 09:41 AM (FvdPb)

37 I am so effing tired of Stan Effing Lee.

Thanks for all the stuff you did pre-1970, but I'm tired of you now.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at May 24, 2015 09:42 AM (oVJmc)

38 If the theme is military books, Pournelle's Falkenberg's Legions books are quite entertaining.

Posted by: Alice van der Goggin at May 24, 2015 09:43 AM (MUYAH)

39
When I think of Christmas 1944, I think of Malmedy.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 24, 2015 09:44 AM (iQIUe)

40 Police: 11 shot, five killed, since late Friday in Baltimore
Just keeping score in Baltimore, this fine Memorial Day Weekend.

Posted by: Colin at May 24, 2015 09:48 AM (5L9G0)

41 "Really the first 3 are the only one's I like.God Emperor was okay,Heretics I didn't care for."
Posted by: steevy at May 24, 2015 09:40 AM (mGBKM)

Thanks, I feel the same way. I just want to know how it all ends, and it is a never ending universe.

Posted by: Alice van der Goggin at May 24, 2015 09:49 AM (MUYAH)

42 My line of "I was there..." books is available at many fine bookstores, and includes riveting series on the Falklands, Zulu Wars, the 100 Days of Peking, and sweeping the abo's from Tasmania.

Posted by: Brian Williams at May 24, 2015 09:49 AM (n6qPA)

43 mindful webworker, I had forgotten about Stan's Soapbox and the MMMS. My impression is that Stan Lee took his job seriously but not himself, at least not back then. But my knowledge of comics ended when they still cost 12 cents. OTOH, selling my collection paid for a good portion of my sophomore year of college.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 09:50 AM (FvdPb)

44 Under the topic of books you must buy for the title, how about Evelyn Waugh's Vile Bodies?

http://www.amazon.com/Vile-Bodies-Evelyn-Waugh/dp/0316926116/

Posted by: Jeremiah McCarthy at May 24, 2015 09:53 AM (3PcUW)

45 Didn't get any reading done as I'm headed on vacation. Still working on reading "Bowerman and the Men of Oregon" and some travel writing.

Not impressed with OBL's reading list. He obviously should have been reading OM's Sunday Book Thread. Always some great stuff here from OM and the Horde.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at May 24, 2015 09:54 AM (/A5gb)

46 I know Stan Lee is 92 years old and one of the most successful men in the world, but if he really is that full of himself, it kind of spoils for me anything he has to say.

That's not the impression I get, at all. I get a good-natured "isn't this all just ridiculous?" vibe. But then that might just be my sense of humor - I would do exactly the same thing he's doing, chuckling the whole time.

Posted by: Jeff Weimer at May 24, 2015 09:56 AM (Edob3)

47 Thanks, JTB, that's kind of the way I was leaning.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 09:58 AM (iuQS7)

48 I just finished Tim Grosecloses's "Left Turn: How Liberal Media Bias Distorts the American Mind". Groseclose is a professor of political science and economics at UCLA.

All of us here recognize the media's bias. The problem with arguing that to leftists is that bias is inherently nonquantitative, i.e. it does not lend itself to measurement. However, this book accomplishes the task. It's based on a publication in an academic journal that received lots of criticism from the academic and media left (BIRM) but no substantive refutation (because it's irrefutable). It's an academic (read dry) exploration of various experiments in measuring bias. The extent of the problem is, if anything, even worse than we imagined.

You won't read this book as light summer reading, but if you're serious about this topic, and we all should be, then make the time for it.

Posted by: pep at May 24, 2015 09:59 AM (LAe3v)

49 11
Willowed in the last thread, so who wants to read about socialism, civilization and the fall of the Roman Empire by Jesus Huerta de Soto?

http://tinyurl.com/socialism-decivilization

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 09:16 AM (t//F+)



That's a good link. I saw that in the last thread.

It is way past time for Keynesian economics to be replaced by Austrian economics. But Keynesian economics gives more power to the state, which is a feature, not a bug, to Our Betters.

Posted by: rickl at May 24, 2015 09:59 AM (sdi6R)

50 Stan Lee has this problem:

When people give you money, buy your stuff and want to hear you speak because they find you to be entertaining, and creative and worthwhile to hear, it is hard to think they are lying.


Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 10:00 AM (t//F+)

51 "Bloodlines of the Illuminati is a unique historical genealogical who's-doing-it book, rich in detail, providing a devastating exposé of the people and families who are THE movers and shakers of the United States and the entire world."

Powerful family groups secretly conspiring to expand their political power and personal wealth, and expand their multigenerational dynasties, while cynically looting and hoodwinking the general public? Strategically allying themselves along the way with Nazis, Soviet communists, the Red Chinese, and other heavy-duty evildoers? Consorting amicably behind closed doors with pedophiles and the heads of manipulative religious cults?

Ridiculous conspiracy theory crap. Irresponsible speculation. The stuff of cheap paperback thrillers. You can rest assured that nothing like that would ever be allowed to happen. The authorities have the situation well under control. Relax, and go back to watching your regularly scheduled programming.

Posted by: The Clinton and Bush Families at May 24, 2015 10:01 AM (noWW6)

52 Last week, "Mad Men" ended by revealing itself to be a slow, sad tale of a morose bastardly womanizer of an ad man who could only live and connect with other people through his art. Oh, and he felt sorry for himself too.


It always interesting how a different writer can take similar material- the artist who lives only for and only through his art-

and can turn it into something genuinely hilarious, genuinely uplifting, and a tribute to the individual human spirit.


Enter Gully Jimson- the under appreciated, poverty-stricken though truly great artist, rapscallion, rogue, and womanizer extraordinaire-

of Joyce Cary's great comic novel,

"The Horse's Mouth".


Gully careens like a cannon ball through the lives of everyone around him lying, using, exploiting,stealing always in the service of creating his next great work of art.

The novel really is both hugely funny and a great work of literature.

Anthony Burgess rated it as one of the great "99 Novels" of the 20th century.


"The Horse's Mouth" though totally self-contained is part of a trilogy with "To Be A Pilgrim" and "Herself Surprised" concerning two people in Gully's orbit.

While interesting reads, neither of those is the comic masterpiece that is "The Horse's Mouth".


Sidenote: Alec Guiness made a pretty good film version of "The Horse's Mouth" with himself in the role of Gully Jimson.

Not as great as the novel but still a lot of fun.


"The Horse's Mouth" is on Kindle for $2.99 and on dead tree for as low as $0.01.

Check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at May 24, 2015 10:01 AM (KUa85)

53 What have you all been reading this week?

The menu at Baskin-Robbins.

Posted by: Barky O'Douche at May 24, 2015 10:05 AM (FcR7P)

54 Related to books and Elisabeth's class, The Great Courses company offers a number of lectures on Greek classics among many other topics. The Greek series is taught by Prof. Elizabeth Vandiver, who is, simply put, excellent. Her courses deal with Greek Tragedy, The Aeneid, Iliad, Odyssey and a few others. They often go on sale for less than 30 bucks. They don't replace reading the originals but they really add to the enjoyment and understanding of the books.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 10:05 AM (FvdPb)

55 I'm working my way through "Inside the Third Reich," Albert Speer's memoir of his life and work in Nazi Germany. Leaving aside his "I knew nozzing" rap and his apparent willingness as a survivor to take on all of the regime's guilt, it's an interesting read. One can see many parallels with certain Men In Power today. Certainly, the megalomania of those who assume -- or are handed -- leadership roles makes in necessary to put strong and unyielding curbs on them.

And yet, despite the evil being done, one can see why a young, ambitious (if slightly morally weak) man like Speer would have been attracted to Hitler. His rise in the regime was fast and relatively painless. Had he know the price, he might have done the same thing all over again.

For (much) lighter reading, just finished one of Harry Harrison's "Stainless Steel Rat" books. He was deeply immersed in the Golden Age of sci-fi, minus all the claptrap imposed on the genre by more recent writers. A good read.

Posted by: MrScribbler at May 24, 2015 10:09 AM (P8YHq)

56 Regarding the "Population Bomb" and other Malthusian apocalyptic fantasies, don't forget this classic

Famine 1975! America's Decision: Who Will Survive?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famine_1975!_America%27s_Decision:_Who_Will_Survive%3F


still available used on Amazon

Posted by: YW at May 24, 2015 10:13 AM (8WYX1)

57 Just got Simmons' "Flashpoint" from the library. What a doorstop! Looking forward to it, though I must confess I found "The Terror" a bit of a slog.

Still working on the latest Flavia de Luce mystery by Alan Bradley. I love her gleeful embrace of death, blowflies, liquefaction and decay.

Also taking in Eric Greitens' "Resilience" in small bites. It's a great book to have on Kindle to take with you on trips, to have nuggets of wisdom to mull over.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 24, 2015 10:14 AM (jR7Wy)

58 Kindle Daily Deals: three books from the Matthew Scudder series by Lawrence Block for $1.99 ea. Block was an excellent storyteller.

I really enjoyed Randall Garrett's alternate history detective Lord Peter Darcy. Can anyone recommend similar books?

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 10:16 AM (sEPMb)

59 Doug, you could go and read all of Garrett's non-copyrighted stuff at Gutenberg

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/25267

And I always loved the Paratime books by H.Beam Piper

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 10:19 AM (t//F+)

60 Thanks for the shout out. Golden Angel is doing well. I've decided to go ahead and release The Lady of Castle Dunn as soon as possible. A successful writing friend said, "It aint makin any money in your computer and when people start reading a series they want to read the whole thing. Maybe when you're famous you can make them wait."

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:19 AM (KbNXw)

61 Interesting how William Wharton didnt start writing until late in his life.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 24, 2015 10:19 AM (iQIUe)

62 Not impressed with OBL's reading list. He obviously should have been reading OM's Sunday Book Thread. Always some great stuff here from OM and the Horde.
Posted by: Long Running Fool at May 24, 2015 09:54 AM (/A5gb)
----
"Horde Compound Reading Lists" and "Horde Presidential Libraries" would be great threads.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 24, 2015 10:20 AM (jR7Wy)

63 Recently finished Witchfinder by Sarah Hoyt. Quite a bit romancier than my normal fare, but I got sucked in all the same. Could use a good proofreading.

Currently reading Monster Hunter International by John C. Wright, because it was free on Amazon (might still be, for all I know). Good fun, although I'm not certain why an accountant in Texas would feel the need to carry not only a pistol, but also a loaded speedloader to work every day. Commas are not John C. Wright's friends. Wish he'd learn about colons and semicolons; there are a few places in his book that could use one or t'other.

Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:23 AM (coJ1L)

64 Yesterday I downloaded this book by Eric Biehm

Legend: A Harrowing Story from the Vietnam War of One Green Beret's Heroic Mission to Rescue a Special Forces Team Caught Behind Enemy Lines

The author was on Hannity Friday. It's about Roy Benavidez, who received a belated Medal of Honor in the 1980s. He had 37 wounds in that action. One of those huge RO-ROs parked in the port of Corpus Christi is named after him.

Posted by: stace at May 24, 2015 10:23 AM (I+uRD)

65 I just read an interesting true-crime book, _The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher_, about a child murder in an English country house in 1860. It was kind of the JonBenet Ramsey case of its day; everybody had a theory. It destroyed the career of the main detective (Mr. Whicher of Scotland Yard) because he couldn't quite find physical evidence to back up his gut feeling.

The culprit did eventually confess, so the book doesn't leave you hanging. (Heh.)

Posted by: Trimegistus at May 24, 2015 10:24 AM (273x0)

66 Posted by: MrScribbler at May 24, 2015 10:09 AM (P8YHq)

I read it a long time ago. Speer struck me as an odd man.....and I agree, his protestations rang hollow.

Have you read "Spandau" yet?

FYI, I have a copy of "Storm of War," that I use as a reference for anything to do with WWII. It may be the best history of the war yet written, and certainly one of the best history books I have ever read.


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at May 24, 2015 10:24 AM (Zu3d9)

67 52 Last week, "Mad Men" ended by revealing itself to be a slow, sad tale of a morose bastardly womanizer of an ad man who could only live and connect with other people through his art. Oh, and he felt sorry for himself too.

==============

And he ended up a multi millionaire with his Coke account , 3 great kids, and banged beautiful broads until the day he died. Oh, the horror!

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 24, 2015 10:24 AM (iQIUe)

68 I like how Amazon on some books it will only cost 1.99 to add the audiobook version. I added the audiobook for hard luck hank for 2.99.

I would like to thank for the recommending "Terms of Enlistment"

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 10:25 AM (CxEX+)

69 That's not the impression I get, at all. I get a good-natured "isn't this all just ridiculous?" vibe. But then that might just be my sense of humor - I would do exactly the same thing he's doing, chuckling the whole time.

Yeah, I'm starting to think you're probably right, and the joke flew right over my head. Rush has the same sort of schtick, and I should have recognized it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 10:25 AM (tiyBy)

70 Monster Hunter International is by Larry Correia, not John C. Wright.

Wright's "Count to A Trillion" series is excellent.

Both are good writers. Correia is more fun-and-guns; Wright is deeper.

Posted by: Trimegistus at May 24, 2015 10:25 AM (273x0)

71 John Nash and his wife were killed. I read his bio way back when. He was not a nice man but it was hard to know if he were was a true jerk, or it was caused by his illness or b/c he was a product of his times. Very sexist, very racist, and didnt mind sucking a dick now and then.

Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 24, 2015 10:26 AM (iQIUe)

72 John C. Wright? Are you sure?

And...

My grandfather was an accountant. There was always a question people had of why he kept a revolver in his desk drawer.
I suspect it is more embarrassing to need it and not have it, than to have it and not need it.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 10:27 AM (t//F+)

73 Thanks, Kindltot!

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 10:28 AM (sEPMb)

74 Stan Lee's cameos immediately pull me out of every Marvel movie. Suspension of disbelief unwillingly un-suspended.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at May 24, 2015 10:30 AM (/pB9Z)

75 Ugh. I know Stan Lee is 92 years old and one of the most successful men in the world, but if he really is that full of himself, it kind of spoils fot me anything he has to say.

While I suspect he has quite an ego, that's just his sales style. He incredibly overpitches and dramatizes everything he advertises and talks about. His writing probably isn't quite as over the top, at least it wasn't in the comics. He has lived quite an interesting life, not the least of which was marrying an incredibly hot woman who he's stayed with ever since.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at May 24, 2015 10:30 AM (39g3+)

76 Stan Lee is funny on the big bang theory.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:31 AM (KbNXw)

77 The 'Decivilization' link was interesting, and it had a funny bit:

...the courage to call for a reduction in "the number of public employees, particularly those whose job it is to regulate, oversee, and inspect all economic activity by imposing costly and extremely interventionist legal requirements" (El Desmoronamiento de España, Madrid...

The 'De-moronization' of Spain?! That must be an interesting book, too.

Posted by: t-bird at May 24, 2015 10:33 AM (FcR7P)

78 51 Bloodlines of the Illuminati is a unique historical genealogical who's-doing-it book, rich in detail, providing a devastating expose of the people and families who are THE movers and shakers of the United States and the entire world.

Thought about checking it out for shits and giggles a la The Star or The Enquirer, but it's priced at $50. Ho Lee Fuk! Scary part is there must be people that buy it.

Posted by: random lurker at May 24, 2015 10:34 AM (WF5ei)

79 I like William Wharton, some of his stuff at least, but A Midnight Clear is basically an anti-war novel about WW2. The military is stupid. War is wrong, etc.

One visit to a Holocaust museum killed my taste for books like that.

Posted by: Old Hob at May 24, 2015 10:35 AM (VRc/p)

80 Read "The Great Zoo of China" this week and if was just plain fun. Need escape from the news.

Posted by: Lizzy at May 24, 2015 10:35 AM (b7Xat)

81 Scorpions are our friends




Word

Posted by: Klaus Meine at May 24, 2015 10:36 AM (tie/0)

82 Stainless Steel Rat books are all great fun, with hidden depth in them that you don't notice because the stories are so amusing.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at May 24, 2015 10:37 AM (39g3+)

83 Have you read "Spandau" yet? Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at May 24, 2015 10:24 AM

Yup. In fact, I read it before ItTR. I'm a little surprised I picked up the memoir, as "Spandau" is maybe one of the most depressing books evah. Page after page of justifying why he was in prison and musing about his personal guilt.... I guess I understand; what the hell else is there to write about while you're spending 20 years in the cooler?

Posted by: MrScribbler at May 24, 2015 10:39 AM (P8YHq)

84 For Memorial day there is a gentleman that put together a site for Authors that are military veterans. All money from the sales are going to veterans groups. Might be worth checking out.

http://tinyurl.com/m4dgadx

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:39 AM (KbNXw)

85 I always like the books Marcus Didius Falco historical mystery novels by Lindsey Davis. He a informer (Detective) it's not heavy reading but I like some of the humor.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 10:40 AM (CxEX+)

86 I just finished the Dan Simmons novel mentioned last week, "Flashback".

If you're looking for a dystopian near future where society's failure is born primarily from progressive ideas this is your book. It is a good read if you understand that the main characters take a back seat to describing how society and the nation failed.

It wraps up a little too neatly but with a little bit of tension similar to how Crichton ended "Sphere".

(SPHERE SPOILER: If you've ever read that novel you know, contrary to the horrible movie, psycho scientist Elizabeth didn't wish away the "power" and now the whole world is pretty much screwed.)

Flashback's end isn't as overtly twisted but I think Simmons was trying to leave the reader with a sense that your conscious connection to life is precious even with the pain and misery that often intrudes and that its absence would actually be torture. At least that what I got out of it.

The "flashback" itself was more of an "ex machina" to help describe how "it all hit the fan" and not the cause of the fall. Obama's part in the fall is implied pretty directly although not by name. I would describe it as a fictionalized account of Steyn's "America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It".

Posted by: BananaDream at May 24, 2015 10:40 AM (vLk7c)

87 There have been more than a few books I've purchased that I couldn't finish and I find myself in that particular dilemma now.

I'm a little over a fourth of the way through "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell". It's the first book, aside from certain assigned reading assignments, that I have to force myself to stay in the story. I can't say why it leaves me with a "meh" but it does.

Does it get better the farther in or should I cut my loses?

Posted by: Usedtocould at May 24, 2015 10:41 AM (vSqfC)

88 Like Korea. A waste. You go to war to WIN. Unconditionally.


Anything else is a waste. Thanks Truman and Johnson.



Fcuk democrats.

Posted by: Nip Sip at May 24, 2015 10:41 AM (xuOEM)

89 Read the next chapter in Lewis' Discarded Image. It is slow going since I read a chapter then spend hours researching all the references he uses. Definitely worth the effort.

On the lighter side, I read "Smoky Mountain Tracks about a woman and her golden retriever doing SAR in the, surprise, Smoky Mountains. A cozy mystery but not vapid. I put it on a par with the Vineyard mysteries by Philip Craig. And it has lots of dogs which always wins my heart. First in a series and I'll start the second one this week.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 10:44 AM (FvdPb)

90 "Horde Compound Reading Lists" and "Horde Presidential Libraries" would be great threads.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 24, 2015 10:20 AM (jR7Wy)

Should be a permalink, but as voracious as AoS readers are, trying to establish a basic list and then update would be a Herculean task!
Related, I am trying to start on Fagles' translation of Homer's "The Odyssey" (previously recommended here by CBD), but there are at least ten other books crying out for my attention!

Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 10:45 AM (ftVQq)

91 I looked through some old books on my dusty bookshelves, but I didn't see any book scorpions.

Posted by: rickl at May 24, 2015 10:45 AM (sdi6R)

92 70
Monster Hunter International is by Larry Correia, not John C. Wright.

My only defense is my stunning lack of caffeine so far this morning.

Maybe I need to keep a caffeine speedloader in my pocket...

Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:48 AM (coJ1L)

93 Anyone read Kurt Schlichter's "Conservative Insurgency"?

I like his columns and there is a bit of Breitbart in the way he thinks. I'm just not sure if he can pull off a novel.

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 10:48 AM (sEPMb)

94 Speaking of Scorpions, I was driving my daughter home from school listening to XM Hair Nation when the first chords of rock you like a Hurricane came on. Immediately I taken back to the days of my big block Camaro and cute mexican girlfriend with big hair and tight jeans. Off in the distance I heard "Daddy, Daddy, DADDY." I glance over and said, "What honey" She said, "That's the song from the Fiber One commercial."

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:49 AM (KbNXw)

95 72
My grandfather was an accountant. There was always a question people had of why he kept a revolver in his desk drawer. I suspect it is more embarrassing to need it and not have it, than to have it and not need it.

I wasn't questioning the revolver so much as the keeping a speedloader in his jacket pocket. Nice to have when you're dealing with a spontaneous werewolf outbreak, but not certain why you'd need it on an average workday.

Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (coJ1L)

96 Reading Emergence: Dave vs. the Monsters (David Hooper Trilogy)

Lots of fun.

Posted by: Ranger at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (jEZIQ)

Posted by: mrp at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (JBggj)

98 O/T

The stupid is large. Officer shot thugs with 49 shots? A glock only holds 15 rounds with an extended mag. So the guy reloaded four times while on the hood of a car?


NOT possible.



http://tinyurl.com/l9mvvsw

Posted by: Nip Sip at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (xuOEM)

99 "Conservative Insurgency" is at least his third book.

Posted by: BananaDream at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (vLk7c)

100 Well rons, I have a smoker to mind, Guacamole to mix uo and a book to edit. I hope everyone has a happy and safe Memorial Day. Later.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:52 AM (KbNXw)

101 Starting "House of Silk" by Anthony Horowitz.

Posted by: Ben Had at May 24, 2015 10:53 AM (T3P1w)

102 Posted by: Nip Sip at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (xuOEM)

No.

Read it again.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at May 24, 2015 10:53 AM (Zu3d9)

103 For Memorial day there is a gentleman that put together a site for Authors that are military veterans. All money from the sales are going to veterans groups. Might be worth checking out.

Thanks, I wish I had known about this before. I added a whole new section to the above-the-fold segment for this. I hope not too many have missed it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 10:54 AM (tiyBy)

104 Posted by: Oldsailors Poet. at May 24, 2015 10:49 AM (KbNXw)

"Youth is wasted on the young."

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at May 24, 2015 10:55 AM (Zu3d9)

105 63 TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda
Sarah doesn't have my peerless proofreader :-D Cut her a little slack.

Monster Hunter International is Larry Correia's baby, and he owned a gun store and was a weapons instructor. He freely and cheerfully admits to writing in lots of gun porn for his audience--and he started out as a proto-indie, hand-selling his book at gun shows and shops. You might like the Grimnoir series better. Those feature a 30's hard-boiled noir feel with magic, and are lots of fun. Less gun fanservice.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at May 24, 2015 10:55 AM (GQdlU)

106 I'm currently reading "Steve Jobs" by Walter Isaacson. Not real far into it, they are just about to come out with the Apple II. Funny thing about the book. Very well written, hard to put down (at least for me), about a person who is very much an arrogant jerk.

Hard to pull off, but Isaacson does it. And he admits he initially did not want to write the book.

Posted by: HH at May 24, 2015 10:56 AM (Ce4DF)

107 Trigger warnings for crazy action, cussing, laser guns and swords, a drunken riot in a Martian capital, and psychic powers.

Sold!
(Love the book trigger warnings!)

Thanks for another great bookthread, OregonMuse!

Posted by: Lizzy at May 24, 2015 10:56 AM (b7Xat)

108 Off in the distance I heard "Daddy, Daddy, DADDY." I glance over and said, "What honey" She said, "That's the song from the Fiber One commercial."


That's funny. When my daughter was little, she couldn't understand why I knew the words to Louie Louie, (such complicated lyrics) she refused to believe it was an old song.

Posted by: Infidel at May 24, 2015 10:59 AM (86Sny)

109 Off in the distance I heard "Daddy, Daddy, DADDY." I glance over and said, "What honey" She said, "That's the song from the Fiber One commercial."

That's part of Madison Avenue's desperate attempt to sell old people products to boomers who refuse to believe they're getting old. There are some hilarious articles about the lengths to which companies are going to adapt their stores and products to aging boomers without mentioning that they are, you know, aging.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at May 24, 2015 11:02 AM (39g3+)

110 That's funny. When my daughter was little, she couldn't understand why I knew the words to Louie Louie, (such complicated lyrics) she refused to believe it was an old song.

Muse daughter LOVES the old music from the 60s and 70s. She tells me that with music today, you don't hear the rich, 4-part harmonies any more, like the old music had. She was a music major in college, so she's sensitive to these things.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:05 AM (tiyBy)

111 81
Scorpions are our friends




Word


Posted by: Klaus Meine

--------------

Yeah, but I'm the coolest one.

Posted by: Rudy Schenker at May 24, 2015 11:05 AM (/pB9Z)

112 Keeping with Memorial Day books, I recommend "Company Commander" by Charles B. Macdonald. A memoir of a green captain who takes over just before the Battle of the Bulge begins. I found it fascinating and moving and it matched some of the 'real stuff' accounts (not sanitized versions) I heard from WW II Marine vets when growing up. Definitely not PC.

Macdonald went on to become the official Army historian. He also wrote "A Time For Trumpets" also about the Bulge.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 11:05 AM (FvdPb)

113 When my daughter was little, she couldn't understand why I knew the
words to Louie Louie, (such complicated lyrics) she refused to believe
it was an old song.


I had a similar experience with pep daughter #2. We were riding in the car, and I was listening to a CD of Big Band music, when Sing Sing Sing came on. She said "it's the Chips Ahoy song" (it was in their commercial at the time).

Posted by: pep at May 24, 2015 11:05 AM (LAe3v)

114 Anachronda @ 95 - The reliability of a revolver is offset by its limited capacity, 5 or 6 rounds. A loaded wheelgun with 2 speed loaders gets you in the same range as an autoloader. Folks who conceal carry tend to believe in carrying enough ammo to get the job done.

Again, better to carry and not need than to need and not have.

Posted by: butch at May 24, 2015 11:06 AM (HLx1C)

115 Been re-reading the WEB Griffin series. Fictional used but with good historical reference.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 24, 2015 11:06 AM (R7HUj)

116 Random observation: "Read" is from the Old English "raedan."
"Lead" is from the Old English "laedan." Yet we drop the "a" out of "lead" to make it past tense.


I'm so glad I was born and raised in English, rather than having had to try to learn it as a second language.

Posted by: Just some guy at May 24, 2015 11:06 AM (yxw0r)

117 You might like the Grimnoir series better. Those
feature a 30's hard-boiled noir feel with magic, and are lots of fun.
Less gun fanservice.


Posted by: Sabrina Chase at May 24, 2015 10:55 AM (GQdlU)

I found the Grimnoir series much more entertaining and read them all but only read two MHI books!

Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 11:08 AM (ftVQq)

118 (El Desmoronamiento de Espana, Madrid...



The 'De-moronization' of Spain?! That must be an interesting book, too.


Collapse. The Collapse of Spain

Not be mistaken for the Spanish word "moron" which means "hill" or "pile"


Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 11:08 AM (t//F+)

119 @112
Two very good books.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 24, 2015 11:08 AM (R7HUj)

120 Off in the distance I heard "Daddy, Daddy, DADDY." I glance over and said, "What honey" She said, "That's the song from the Fiber One commercial."


The absolutely last connection I want in the advertising for a Fiber product is-

between said Fiber product and a Hurricane.

Posted by: naturalfake at May 24, 2015 11:08 AM (0cMkb)

121 "Speaking of Scorpions, I was driving my daughter home from school
listening to XM Hair Nation when the first chords of rock you like a
Hurricane came on. Immediately I taken back to the days of my big block
Camaro and cute mexican girlfriend with big hair and tight jeans."

-------------

For me it was a '75 Firebird and a black-haired girl in tight jeans who gave full monty BJ's.

Best three months of my life.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at May 24, 2015 11:09 AM (/pB9Z)

122 67 52 Last week, "Mad Men" ended by revealing itself to be a slow, sad tale of a morose bastardly womanizer of an ad man who could only live and connect with other people through his art. Oh, and he felt sorry for himself too.

==============

And he ended up a multi millionaire with his Coke account , 3 great kids, and banged beautiful broads until the day he died. Oh, the horror!
Posted by: Bruce But Not Jenner at May 24, 2015 10:24 AM (iQIUe)



Exactly, right?


But, no.


Boo hoo, poor me.

Posted by: naturalfake at May 24, 2015 11:10 AM (0cMkb)

123 ACDC, Back in Black would be the last thing I would connect with AmEx.

Posted by: Infidel at May 24, 2015 11:11 AM (86Sny)

124 Monster Hunter International is Larry Correia's baby, and he owned a gun store and was a weapons instructor

Holy crap, with a resumé like that, no wonder he causes the social justice wankers to break out in hives

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:12 AM (tiyBy)

125 We were riding in the car, and I was listening to a CD of Big Band music, when Sing Sing Sing came on. She said "it's the Chips Ahoy song" (it was in their commercial at the time).

Of course, it's the same with our generation. How many of us first heard opera music from watching Bubs Bunny cartoons?

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:15 AM (tiyBy)

126 Just finished the "Slow Burn" series by Bobby Adair.

Very well done zombie series.

Posted by: eman at May 24, 2015 11:17 AM (MQEz6)

127 Seen in bookstore: Steve Inskeep, Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab.

There was a very interesting juxtaposition between the "Indian Map" of 1812 and the official, government map of 1812, which had a "Mississippi Territory" that didn't really, uh, exist. Likewise western Tennessee and Kentucky were not under state control; and almost the whole area Spain claimed in Florida was swamp wherein the Spanish language was never heard. The Five Civilized Tribes were the sovereign authority over most of the area. They were called the "Civilized Tribes" because they were approaching definition as sovereign nations, especially the Cherokee.

Jackson made himself very rich by taking the cream off what his soldiers took by force.

So, nowadays, I notice there's a movement to kick Andrew Jackson's mug off the $20 and to replace it with a symbolic reproach to white American manhood: Harriet Tubman. This book is timely, perhaps suspiciously so.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at May 24, 2015 11:18 AM (AVEe1)

128 Well, in my case I was subjected to opera long before I was allowed to watch cartoons. Bugs Bunny always seemed familiar to me.

Posted by: Infidel at May 24, 2015 11:19 AM (86Sny)

129 Been re-reading the WEB Griffin series. Fictional used but with good historical reference.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 24, 2015 11:06 AM (R7HUj)

I find he is a consistently pretty good read, although he has a common formula for his series format, and there are one or two where he really phoned it in. I just started on his latest book (Clandestine Operations series) with new characters but cross-linked to the "Honor" series and really enjoyed it.
Funny thing about WEB Griffin is that for a while he wrote using at least three pen names, and IIRC, he actually cranked out all sorts of books in all sorts of genres under even more pen names. I picked up a book in an airport years ago and was reading on the plane and thought to myself, boy this style is straight from the "WEBG" manual only to later find out that it was actually was him.

Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 11:19 AM (ftVQq)

130 Maybe I need to keep a caffeine speedloader in my pocket...

Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:48 AM (coJ1L)

Someone should sell a caffeine-loaded Epi-pen.

Posted by: stace at May 24, 2015 11:19 AM (CoX6k)

131 So, nowadays, I notice there's a movement to kick Andrew Jackson's mug off the $20 and to replace it with a symbolic reproach to white American manhood: Harriet Tubman.

Yeah, I'm sure that'll go over big.

Posted by: The Susan B Anthony Dollar at May 24, 2015 11:21 AM (tiyBy)

132 Someone should sell a caffeine-loaded Epi-pen.

Posted by: stace at May 24, 2015 11:19 AM (CoX6k)

I think you've got a kickstarter concept there!

Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 11:22 AM (ftVQq)

133 121 ... Hmmm! Mine was a '61 Mercury Comet with fins over the tail lights and very comfortable bench seats.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 11:22 AM (FvdPb)

134 That painting breaks my heart.

Posted by: Tuna at May 24, 2015 11:22 AM (JSovD)

135 Good scifi: Star Splinter by J.G. Cressey.

Posted by: eman at May 24, 2015 11:23 AM (MQEz6)

136 Oregon Muse, he has a blog. called Monster Hunter Nation.

What he writes for fun makes the SJbarristas break out into fits of screaming and frothing at the mouth,

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 11:24 AM (t//F+)

137 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at May 24, 2015 11:18 AM (AVEe1)

Inskeep is an NPRerican.

Posted by: eman at May 24, 2015 11:25 AM (MQEz6)

138 I've read a quick, exciting, funny book in which the good guys win and the bad guys lose, Magic by marine veteran Edmund Humm. Magic is a genetically engineered golden retriever created by evil mad Iranian (but I repeat myself) scientists. He escapes and takes up with a marine who takes him back to the US. Then they run across corrupt government bureaucrats conspiring with Iranian terrorists to smuggle top secret high tech weapons to Iran, China, and others. Magic is super intellegent but inexperienced in life. Magic is the narrator of much of the book and he misunderstand much of what is going on but assures us he knows because he saw it on television.

I'd classify this as a young adult novel but I'd say a fifth or sixth grader who is a good reader would enjoy it. One annoying thing: the hero is named Quinn and the chief bureaucrat bad guy is named Winn and, for some reason, the editor missed several instances in which these names are reversed.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at May 24, 2015 11:26 AM (LImiJ)

139 127
So, nowadays, I notice there's a movement to kick Andrew Jackson's mug off the $20 and to replace it with a symbolic reproach to white American manhood: Harriet Tubman. This book is timely, perhaps suspiciously so.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at May 24, 2015 11:18 AM (AVEe1)



Somebody mentioned somewhere that Harriet Tubman was a Republican and a gun owner. On the Underground Railroad, she was prepared to shoot slaves who got cold feet and wanted to turn back, lest they give away the rest of the group.

Posted by: rickl at May 24, 2015 11:30 AM (sdi6R)

140 What he writes for fun makes the SJbarristas break out into fits of screaming and frothing at the mouth,

Oh, I know about his blog, I've read it from time to time, Correia deliberately baits the pajama kids and it's hilarious.

I knew from reading Monster Hunter that he knew quite a bit about weaponry, I just didn't know he was an instructor, too. Talk about adding insult to injury. The SJW butthurt never stops.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:31 AM (tiyBy)

141 Question for the Horde: if you had to pick one relatively short section of the Aeneid for young skulls full of mush to read, what would it be?

-
Aeneas leaving Dido and her subsequent suicide. I could see themes of love and fate. Aeneas's escape from Troy is also good.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at May 24, 2015 11:32 AM (LImiJ)

142 OM ... Thanks, as always, for the great Sunday book thread and for the painting at the top of the post. I don't think I've ever visited the Wall with completely dry eyes.

Posted by: JTB at May 24, 2015 11:33 AM (FvdPb)

143 87 There have been more than a few books I've purchased that I couldn't finish and I find myself in that particular dilemma now.

I'm a little over a fourth of the way through "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell". It's the first book, aside from certain assigned reading assignments, that I have to force myself to stay in the story. I can't say why it leaves me with a "meh" but it does.

Does it get better the farther in or should I cut my loses?
Posted by: Usedtocould at May 24, 2015 10:41 AM (vSqfC)

I read it years ago and have never felt compelled to read it again.

Posted by: Lea at May 24, 2015 11:36 AM (vmMMi)

144 Andrew Jackson probably wouldn't have been too keen about appearing on a Federal Reserve Note anyway.

Posted by: rickl at May 24, 2015 11:37 AM (sdi6R)

145 Starting "House of Silk" by Anthony Horowitz.

-
I quite liked that book.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at May 24, 2015 11:40 AM (LImiJ)

146 Thanks for the shout out Oregon Muse. Maybe the book will sell better if I put Trggirr Warning on cover or use that as title for next collection.

The novel on book thieves is hard to get excited over after "The Book Thief" and "The Nineth Gate."

"Comat Meido Alice" first draft got finished last night. Just shy of 7,300 words. I think I managed to keep it light and fun.

Posted by: Anna Puma at May 24, 2015 11:40 AM (VFat/)

147 All the posts about Greek and Roman literature up thread has prompted me to dig Xenophon's "Anabasis of Cyrus" for a reread. Sometimes real life is more exciting than fiction.

Posted by: Tuna at May 24, 2015 11:42 AM (JSovD)

148 Anna, I am so sorry, but everytime I see your title I read it "Combat Miedo".

I am betrayed by my eyes.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 11:43 AM (t//F+)

149 An intelligent GOPe leadership would be out there today, explaining why this was necessary (ITO) and, absolutely critically, telling the base "We know you're upset about this, and we understand why". Somehow, I suspect the response will be more along the lines of mockery of the wingnuts.

You go with that GOPe. After all, it's worked out so well for Jeb.

Posted by: pep at May 24, 2015 11:44 AM (LAe3v)

150 143
Or you could wait for the series. I believe it is running or about to run in the UK. Only a matter of time before it hits PBS.

Posted by: Tuna at May 24, 2015 11:45 AM (JSovD)

151 Well, that was the wrong thread, now wasn't it.

Posted by: pep at May 24, 2015 11:45 AM (LAe3v)

152
Have any fellow morons read The True History of the Conquest of New Spain, by Bernal Diaz del Castillo? It's often also simply titled The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico.

Full of incredible stories, it's hard to put down. I've read hundreds, perhaps thousands, of books about war and I'd have to put it in my top 25 list.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 24, 2015 11:46 AM (RcpcZ)

153 Famine 1975! America's Decision: Who Will Survive?

-
I survived '75.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at May 24, 2015 11:46 AM (LImiJ)

154 Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 11:19 AM (ftVQq)

Yes. He can be formulaic. Still I don't mind. I've worked with some guys who assisted him in some of his research and he really does his homework. He wants to get it right.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 24, 2015 11:47 AM (R7HUj)

155

(Son to Father. . .)
Do not call me, father. Do not seek me.
Do not call me. Do not wish me back.
We're on a route uncharted, fire and blood erase
our track.

On we fly on wings of thunder, never more to
sheathe our swords.
All of us in battle fallen - not to be brought back by
words.

Will there be a rendezvous? I know not. I only know
we still must fight.
We are sand grains in infinity, never to meet.
nevermore to see light.

(Father to Son . . .)
Farewell, then my son. Farewell then my conscience.
Farewell my youth, my solace, my one and my only.

Let this farewell be the end of the story,
A solitude vast in which none is more lonely,
In which you remained barred forever
From light, from air, with your death pains untold.
Untold and unsoothed, never to be resurrected.
Forever and ever an 18 year old.

Farewell then.
No trains ever come from those regions,
Unscheduled and scheduled.
No aeroplanes flythere.

Farewell then my son,
For no miracles happen, as in this world
Dreams do not come true.

Farewell.
I will dream of you still as a baby,
Treading the earth with little strong toes,
The earth where already so many lie buried.

This song to my son, then, is come to its close.

Extract from a poem by Jr. Lt. Vladimir Pavlovich Antokolski.

Killed in action, June 6th, 1942

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 24, 2015 11:48 AM (St6BJ)

156 >"Starting "House of Silk" by Anthony Horowitz."

Good book. If you like it, you will probably like his "Moriarty."

Posted by: doug at May 24, 2015 11:50 AM (sEPMb)

157 Sorry about that trick upon the eyes Kindltot.

Combat Maid might be more clear as text but conjures what kind of image? A maid in the traditional sense. So Meido it is.

And you should pass out copies of Piper's "Space Viking" and ask if we are Marduk. Barbarians inside the gates.

Posted by: Anna Puma at May 24, 2015 11:50 AM (VFat/)

158 85
Try Ruth Downie's " Medicus" series about a Roman army physician stated in Britain during the reign of Hadrian. Fun.

Posted by: Tuna at May 24, 2015 11:52 AM (JSovD)

159 Andrew Jackson probably wouldn't have been too keen about appearing on a Federal Reserve Note anyway.

It is ironic that the man who smashed the federal bank is on currency, I agree. Not sure how he ended up a candidate to begin with, given his... mixed reputation.

I don't care who they put on the money, as long as they're a non-traitorous American. Just seems like a pretty low priority, and the picture they keep using is probably the most hideous image of the poor woman ever.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at May 24, 2015 11:52 AM (39g3+)

160
I just found out The True History of the Conquest of New Spain is available free at Project Gutenberg:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32474/32474-h/32474-h.htm

I consider it a must read.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 24, 2015 11:53 AM (RcpcZ)

161
Just about finished with another re-reading of the Dune books by Herbert. I'm missing only Heretics of Dune.

But I've discovered there is a whole series of Universe of Dune books, eighteen or more, and a School of Dune set. The reviews on Amazon are not encouraging. Anyone have any opinions.

The idea of a twenty book series on Dune is too close to David Weber's gazzion book set in Honor Harrington's universe.

I need something to take me away from current events.Posted by: Alice van der Goggin at May 24, 2015 09:31 AM (MUYAH)

------

The only "Dune" books worth reading are the ones done by Frank Herbert. I read the three "House" books and they just don't feel like Dune to me. A number of characters feel off, and a number of events don't jibe with my memories of the original books.

Posted by: Darth Randall at May 24, 2015 11:53 AM (6n332)

162 158
Stationed. I'll blame it on auto correct.

Posted by: Tuna at May 24, 2015 11:54 AM (JSovD)

163 Have any fellow morons read The True History of the Conquest of New Spain, by Bernal Diaz del Castillo? It's often also simply titled The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico.

Full
of incredible stories, it's hard to put down. I've read hundreds,
perhaps thousands, of books about war and I'd have to put it in my top
25 list.
Posted by: Ed Anger at May 24, 2015 11:46 AM (RcpcZ)


Oh, yes. There has never been a book that I wanted so badly for both sides to lose. When Bernal Diaz was talking about the Spanish butchering Indians for the fat to dress their wounds, it made me realize that these were barbarians.

It was, however, pretty much the last time a catapult was built and attempted to be deployed as an actual weapon.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 24, 2015 11:54 AM (t//F+)

164 Have any fellow morons read The True History of the Conquest of New Spain, by Bernal Diaz del Castillo? It's often also simply titled The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico.

I started it, got about half way through the first volume, then got distracted by a shiny object. But you're right, it's full of great stories, and I should get back to it.

Available for free on Gutenberg, i do believe.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:56 AM (tiyBy)

165
Wait for me, and I'll come back!
Wait with all you've got!
Wait, when dreary yellow rains
Tell you, you should not.
Wait when snow is falling fast,
Wait when summer's hot,
Wait when yesterdays are past,
Others are forgot.
Wait, when from that far-off place,
Letters don't arrive.
Wait, when those with whom you wait
Doubt if I'm alive.

Wait for me, and I'll come back!
Wait in patience yet
When they tell you off by heart
That you should forget.
Even when my dearest ones
Say that I am lost,
Even when my friends give up,
Sit and count the cost,
Drink a glass of bitter wine
To the fallen friend -
Wait! And do not drink with them!
Wait until the end!

Wait for me and I'll come back,
Dodging every fate!
"What a bit of luck!" they'll say,
Those that would not wait.
They will never understand
How amidst the strife,
By your waiting for me, dear,
You had saved my life.
Only you and I will know
How you got me through.
Simply - you knew how to wait -
No one else but you.

Konstantin Simonov 1941

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at May 24, 2015 11:56 AM (St6BJ)

166 Read The Secret Race: Inside The Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-Ups, and Winning at All Costs by Tyler Hamilton and Daniel Coyle. Book is as described in the title, Coyle writes very well as Hamilton spills the beans on everyone. Pretty interesting story how bicyclists (including Armstrong) managed to take all kinds of PEDs and other stuff while testing clean. Hard to see how competitive sports can ever be clean again.

Listened to Crichton's Prey where an unemployed programmer turned Mr Mom takes on malevolent nanotech bugs, entertaining quick story.

Got the Hugo pack, pretty cool except a couple of the novels were only excerpted.

Posted by: waelse1 at May 24, 2015 11:57 AM (LfN7n)

167 Kind of interesting. The flag trivia link in the overnight thread had a link to the State Department flag use guidelines and they are at odds with the Department of Defense flag use guidelines. State Department says to never show the flag "backwards" as the Department of Defense says to show it on the right shoulder of a military uniform with the stars always facing forward.

Posted by: Dang at May 24, 2015 12:01 PM (XWo4d)

168 To Rome and Beyond: With Our Story of the 760th Tank Battalion, WWII
by John E. Krebs

My Dad's tank unit North Africa and Italy

Posted by: FCF at May 24, 2015 12:01 PM (kejii)

169 "In the Company of Ogres", Never Dead Fred and Hard Luck Hank sound like cousins.

Posted by: Reader at May 24, 2015 12:06 PM (PGh+Q)

170 But I've discovered there is a whole series of Universe of Dune books, eighteen or more, and a School of Dune set. The reviews on Amazon are not encouraging. Anyone have any opinions.

I've only read one of the newer books and I was not impressed. They are not really anything like Frank Herbert's work and feel more like fan fiction set in the same universe.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at May 24, 2015 12:10 PM (39g3+)

171
#167: Kind of interesting. The flag trivia link in the overnight thread had a link to the State Department flag use guidelines and they are at odds with the Department of Defense flag use guidelines. State Department says to never show the flag "backwards" as the Department of Defense says to show it on the right shoulder of a military uniform with the stars always facing forward.

This is something that infuriated my late father, veteran of WWII, Korea and Vietnam. The flag should always be displayed with the field in the upper left corner. That's the way it was displayed on military uniforms until that it "flew backwards" caught President Clinton's eye. Clinton personally changed the rules to say the flag should never be displayed "flying backwards".

My dad was a big stickler about proper flag display. He also hated Clinton for lots of reasons. But of all of the reasons why he hated Clinton this one really made his blood boil.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 24, 2015 12:14 PM (RcpcZ)

172 Yes. He can be formulaic. Still I don't mind. I've
worked with some guys who assisted him in some of his research and he
really does his homework. He wants to get it right.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 24, 2015 11:47 AM (R7HUj)

I don't mind either because the storylines are generally pretty darn good. It's just that I always mentally note here's the formula again and then keep on reading!

Posted by: Hrothgar at May 24, 2015 12:16 PM (ftVQq)

173 "The Forgotten Soldier" by Guy Sajer. Autobiographical account of a Frenchman serving in the Gross Deutschland Division in Russia. Fantastic read. Unforgettable scene where the author and a small group of Germans are manning a trench in the steppe and see what looks like a long dark line on the horizon. Starts getting larger and larger and a buzzing noise starts to grow louder. They can't quite figure out what it is, then they suddenly realize it is a horde of thousands of Russians charging at them in a massive human wave assault, yelling "Oorah!" as they come. Hair-raising account.

Posted by: Landru at May 24, 2015 12:16 PM (KuIdO)

174 "...A Midnight Clear is basically an anti-war novel about WW2. The military is stupid. War is wrong, etc. ..."

My take on the movie's message was that you can't tell who's winning if you are fighting it. Sgt Knott got the Germans who wanted to surrender killed by not asserting his authority. The movie continually showed how emotional thinking gets people killed. General Sherman really had the right idea even though Sherman deserves to be in hell for the things he ordered as much as any other monster.

Posted by: war studier at May 24, 2015 12:18 PM (PGh+Q)

175 My only problem with WEBG is his romantic dialogue. All the "darlings" and stuff may work in the WWII settings but they don't work when the stories are set in modern era. But then again I don't read him for the romantic subplots.

Posted by: lowandslow at May 24, 2015 12:23 PM (dItuC)

176
#173: Starts getting larger and larger and a buzzing noise starts to grow louder. They can't quite figure out what it is, then they suddenly realize it is a horde of thousands of Russians charging at them in a massive human wave assault, yelling "Oorah!" as they come. Hair-raising account.

My dad also hated the sound of the Chicom bugles as they charged in Korea. He said everybody knew right away that that were in for a very bad time.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 24, 2015 12:24 PM (RcpcZ)

177 The only Dune book that is good is the first one. All the rest blow chunks. And I see the publisher has finally reduced the e-book price to a reasonable one ($5.99). They had it for a long time at $10.99.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at May 24, 2015 12:29 PM (GpgJl)

178 Re Aeneid stuff --

One of the most compelling excerpts for me was my teacher going over "Fama" with the dark wings of lies.

For some reason, that one has always stuck with me. Probably lots of contemporary tie-ins as well.

Chilling description and Mrs W made the most of it.

Posted by: mustbequantum at May 24, 2015 12:43 PM (MIKMs)

179 I liked the other Dune books (haven't tried the ones written after he died). But they are formulaic and little if any new ground was broken after the first. mind candy they worked for me. Similar to Heinlein's "Friday". eg read a chapter before bed. There is a precursor to Dune that was given to me but I don't remember the title. It had a sociopath emperor but the spice was just hinted at and would have been discovered in the next book. Long out of print and could be considered an embarrassment to the series. If I come upon it in my stacks I'll post the title (probably won't happen).

Posted by: Dune reader at May 24, 2015 12:49 PM (PGh+Q)

180 Great book thread.

Posted by: bour3 at May 24, 2015 12:49 PM (5x3+2)

181 To whoever suggested it, I'm really enjoying the "Dadly Virtues" link. Lileks, Goldberg, Last, Carlson, Long, et al. I'm not the target demo and even I find it hilarious:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8SMOk2T5DI

I saw Jonathan Last on Red Eye and he's very funny.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at May 24, 2015 12:53 PM (jR7Wy)

182 Used to could: No, it does not. I have always marveled at people who talked up this book. I pretty much skimmed through the last half of it.

Posted by: Rana at May 24, 2015 12:53 PM (2u0/J)

183 Just finished (on audiobook) "Zero Separation" by Philip S. Donlay. What a potboiler! The only problem I had with it was that I always arrived at my destination in the middle of an action scene. I'll look for the others in his series.

For a change of pace, I've started "The Red Box," a Nero Wolfe mystery. I love these books.

And I've got the first Flavia de Luce book from the library. Chalk up another conquest for the book thread!

Posted by: Weak Geek at May 24, 2015 01:01 PM (K7u45)

184 I'm reading Kate Morton's "The Secret Keeper" for my book club. Morton is one of the few contemporary writers that I can wholeheartedly recommend to other readers because she's a fabulous storyteller - no angst, no deeper meaning, just a really good story well told.

Posted by: biancaneve at May 24, 2015 01:03 PM (HaVMa)

185 Just finished 'Invasion, 1944', written by Hans Speidel, 1949 (I think). Sptdel was Rommel's Chief of Staff.

I recommend it. It certainly gave me a better understanding of Rommel, and the sociopathy of Hitler. Rommel, quite rightly despised Hilter and his politics.

There is quite a bit there dealing directly with the Normandy invasion, and missed opportunities on both sides.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 24, 2015 01:05 PM (F2IAQ)

186 Any list of best war books that doesn't mention Guy Sajer's "The Forgotten Soldier" is seriously incomplete. He was an Alsation draftee that went on to serve in the Grossdeutschland Division. It describes the hell of the Russian front better than any other book I've read. Lent it out many times, readers raved about it, my copy is now pretty raggedy.

Posted by: JHW at May 24, 2015 01:09 PM (w+zdY)

187 183 Just finished (on audiobook) "Zero Separation" by Philip S. Donlay. What a potboiler! The only problem I had with it was that I always arrived at my destination in the middle of an action scene. I'll look for the others in his series.


Posted by: Weak Geek at May 24, 2015 01:01 PM (K7u45)

What's the first book?

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 01:15 PM (CxEX+)

188 "Read the citations sometime. Just read them."

http://www.cmohs.org/featured-recipients.php
http://www.basiloneparade.com/citation-guad.htm
http://riverinesailor.com/MOHcitation.htm
http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-detail/3256/davis-sammy-l.php
http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-detail/3484/carter-ty-m.php

Posted by: HAL at May 24, 2015 01:21 PM (OmBeX)

189 The one thing I hate about Amazon is that they make it so hard to find a book in a series.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 01:24 PM (CxEX+)

190 Books you buy for the title.

The Big Book Of Lesbian Horse Stories

How to Live with a Huge Penis: Advice, Meditations, and Wisdom for Men Who Have Too Much

Posted by: reader at May 24, 2015 01:29 PM (PGh+Q)

191 Re war books. The evergreen 'Rifleman Dodd', by C.S. Forester.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 24, 2015 01:38 PM (F2IAQ)

192 It was good to see Mark Helprin's "A Soldier of the Great War" at No. 6 on ranker.com's Famous War Books and Novels. This epic tale tells the story of an extraordinary man's journey through life. A key segment is about the terrible conditions on the mountainous Italian-Austrian front during World War I.

The book checks in at 800 pages, but I would have been happier if it had been twice as long. It's simply the best novel I've ever read. Prior.

Posted by: Blackjack Pershing at May 24, 2015 01:41 PM (mF5gt)

193 JHW - 186 Thanks for the tip on 'Forgotten Soldier'.
Just checked ABE Books Free Shipping site
( http://tinyurl.com/me9wvuw ) there are several copies available for less than $4.00, with free shipping, so I ordered one in.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 24, 2015 01:46 PM (F2IAQ)

194 The book checks in at 800 pages, but I would have been happier if it had been twice as long. It's simply the best novel I've ever read. Prior.
Posted by: Blackjack Pershing
------------------

I don't think that I could pick a 'best' novel, but it is an extraordinary book. Certainly better than some Nobel/Pulitizer prize winners that I have read.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 24, 2015 01:49 PM (F2IAQ)

195 Posted by: Lizzy at May 24, 2015 10:35 AM (b7Xat)
Ha! I read that this week as well. It *was* a fun, and fairly quick, read. I especially appreciated that ther weren't lots of broken bones (probably unrealistically few) after reading a Dresden novel recently. I always forget in between novels that (at least it seems like) some how Dresden is supposed to be operating with at least one major bone fracture at any given time.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at May 24, 2015 01:57 PM (GDulk)

196
The one thing I hate about Amazon is that they make it so hard to find a book in a series.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 01:24 PM (CxEX+)

I like to use Fantastic Fiction. They are so much better organized. An author's page shows series, order written and dates.
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/

Posted by: Tunafish at May 24, 2015 02:00 PM (6FsbQ)

197 Patrick --

The first book is "Category Five," followed by "Code Black" and then "Zero Separation." After those are "Deadly Echoes" and Donlay's latest, Aftershock."

Check the author's website, www.philipdonlay.com.

Posted by: Weak Geek at May 24, 2015 02:17 PM (K7u45)

198 Thanks for the shout out to my book! I like happy endings too.

Posted by: Jami Gold at May 24, 2015 02:29 PM (cbXhJ)

199 Nobody pays attention to the "Population Bomb"?

One of Obamao's favorite books, so much so he hired the authors (Ehrlich) co-author of similar "We are all gonna die, so let us start killing people now!" books - John P. Holdren as Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Posted by: Burnt Toast at May 24, 2015 02:34 PM (NaeCR)

200 Great war novels...

The 13th Valley...John del Vecchio

Posted by: Budahmon at May 24, 2015 02:41 PM (vcSri)

201 Just catching up--thanks, GWS and mustbequantum!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 03:09 PM (iuQS7)

202 197 Patrick --

The first book is "Category Five," followed by "Code Black" and then "Zero Separation." After those are "Deadly Echoes" and Donlay's latest, Aftershock."

Check the author's website, www.philipdonlay.com.
Posted by: Weak Geek at May 24, 2015 02:17 PM (K7u45)
Thanks
I just wish he would label the book first in the blank series

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at May 24, 2015 03:13 PM (CxEX+)

203 These Best War fiction lists contain __Catch 22__ and __Slaughterhouse 5__ yet omit Solzhenitsyn's __August, 1914__. Lightweight reviewers. Good to see that one list included Grossman's stunning __Life and Fate__.

Recommendation for people who like a story of America's Korean War experience with some tropical flavor: __Hey, Pineapple!__, by Hawaii-born Robert Hong, who served. Funny, sad, hideous, compassionate, reflective.
For a non-fiction recommendation that appears on none of these Best Books on War lists: ... C.W.C. Oman, __The Art of War in the Middle Ages__.

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at May 24, 2015 04:13 PM (IbUUZ)

204 18
Finished Michael Connelly's "The Burning Room." As always, Bosch is
interesting, the plot twists are both surprising and plausible and his
new partner is interesting in her own right.



Almost done Dennis Lehane's "World Gone By." (Joe Coughlin #3).
Set in WWII Tampa underworld. I don't think anyone does the criminal
world better than Lehane. To my taste, this is far the strongest of the
three books. Can be read without reading the previous 2.

Doug- just picked up Lehane's book used and put it in my to-read pile, but think I might put it on top of the pile now.

Posted by: Charlotte at May 24, 2015 04:27 PM (VRwlD)

205 23 This week I read Barack Obama and the Enemies Within by Trevor Lauden, a New Zealand political researcher and blogger.

Loudon. Trevor Loudon.

Posted by: BornLib at May 24, 2015 04:33 PM (zpNwC)

206 32 26 The stuff written by his son is terrible.
Posted by: steevy at May 24, 2015 09:39 AM (mGBKM)

While I was checking out the LFS booth at Marcon I discovered that Brian Herbert wrote a little book last year called "The Little Green Book of Chairman Rahma"

I haven't read it yet, but the Greens who have reviewed it don't take kindly to being compared to Mao. Well too damn bad.

Posted by: BornLib at May 24, 2015 04:46 PM (zpNwC)

207 Nice to have when you're dealing with a spontaneous werewolf outbreak, but not certain why you'd need it on an average workday.


Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (coJ1L)




If you carry, you carry at least one reload.



The stupid is large. Officer shot thugs with 49 shots? A glock only
holds 15 rounds with an extended mag. So the guy reloaded four times
while on the hood of a car?



A Glock 19 holds 14 in a standard magazine with one in the pipe, the extended mags are 30 rounders. IIRC, the standard G17 mag is a 15 rounder, but I could be wrong. It has happened before.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at May 24, 2015 04:56 PM (/2KMt)

208 Monster Hunter International is Larry Correia's baby, and he owned a gun store and was a weapons instructor

Holy crap, with a resumé like that, no wonder he causes the social justice wankers to break out in hives


Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 11:12 AM (tiyBy)



His gun store was called Fuzzy Bunny Movie Guns IIRC.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at May 24, 2015 04:59 PM (/2KMt)

209 Question for the Horde: if you had to pick one relatively short section of the Aeneid for young skulls full of mush to read, what would it be? (I'm using Dryden's translation because a) it's free on Project Gutenberg and b) they get two major poets for the price of one.) I say "relatively short" because it'll be the first week of class and because I'm having them read all of Hesiod's Theogony for the previous class session and don't want them burning out *too* badly.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at May 24, 2015 09:19 AM (iuQS7)


Dryden's translation will leave your students with the unfortunate impression that epic poetry rhymes relentlessly. Fagles is a more faithful translation. T.E. Lawrence (yes, that T.E. Lawrence) also translated the work, along with about a hundred other people.

Posted by: A. Guy at May 24, 2015 05:15 PM (1EJIj)

210 Turns out the Gutenberg Project also has Mackail's translation of the Aeneid available.

Posted by: A. Guy at May 24, 2015 05:25 PM (1EJIj)

211 A wonderful Doctor Who two-part episode, "Human Nature" and "The Family of Blood", finished with this verse:

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them."

It was the first time I'd heard it, but I've watched the episodes many times and it never fails to bring me to tears.

Posted by: MathMom at May 24, 2015 06:06 PM (/IlF7)

212 "I wasn't questioning the revolver so much as the
keeping a speedloader in his jacket pocket. Nice to have when you're
dealing with a spontaneous werewolf outbreak, but not certain why you'd
need it on an average workday.


Posted by: TRIGGER WARNING: Anachronda at May 24, 2015 10:50 AM (coJ1L)"

I always carry a speedloader when I carry a revolver because even with the extra five rounds, ten is less than I have in the magazine of my 9mm.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at May 24, 2015 06:56 PM (QHgTq)

213 For an easy way to find all the books in a series, I recommend orderofbooks.com.

Posted by: biancaneve at May 24, 2015 07:04 PM (HaVMa)

214 What's the name of the painting on this post, and who's the artist?

Posted by: Alex at May 24, 2015 08:24 PM (7Yy8M)

215 #214 I don't know I stole it from this page, where it is unattributed:

https://twg2a.wordpress.com/2011/05/28/memorial-day-2011/

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 10:08 PM (tiyBy)

216 This page says the artist is Lee Teeter:

http://dva.state.wi.us/PA-VietnamVeteransDay.asp

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 10:15 PM (tiyBy)

217 oops, misspelled the artist's name:

http://www.leeteter.com/

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 24, 2015 10:17 PM (tiyBy)

218 reading new Neil Stephenson, Seveneves.

Posted by: Buddha at May 25, 2015 09:33 AM (3F6F8)

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