Sunday Morning Book Thread 04-26-2015: Mostly Politics [OregonMuse]


Dickens-Dream-Robert-Will-014-525.jpg
Dickens' Dream by Robert William Buss


Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.

I learned from watching the movie Hereafter that this 1870 watercolor painting depicting a sleeping Charles Dickens surrounded by the characters from his novels is on display in the Charles Dickens Museum in London. The small size here doesn't do it justice. You really need to see a larger version to get the full effect.


New Hillary! Book

The MSM is all a-twitter over the fact that Hillary! isn't being embraced by the masses.

In addition to the requisite political bio or manifesto by the likes of candidates including Senators Rand Paul and Ted Cruz and former Governor Jeb Bush, there will be a new category in the pub world: the anti-Hillary book.

Oh my. Somebody dared to write a book critical of Hillary! and her brazen grifting? Le horreur! So who is this nefarious bad person?

This man. His latest book, Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich, is not even out yet, but are condemning it in advance because it asks the question

In 2000, Bill and Hillary Clinton owed millions of dollars in legal debt. Since then, they've earned over $130 million. Where did the money come from?

So it sounds like this book on the Clintons if of a piece with a couple of his earlier ones, namely Extortion: How Politicians Extract Your Money, Buy Votes, and Line Their Own Pockets and Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich Off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison.

Incidentally, did you know that our senators and representatives in Washington DC are exempt from insider trading laws? Yes, indeed they are.

Also, why does the article mention only Republican bios? Doesn't Elizabeth Warren count?


Whodunnit?

Or, more accurately, whosolvedit?

Because IE decided to take one of its periodic dumps right when I was finishing up, I don't know what my score was on this famous detectives quiz, but I was doing so poorly, it couldn't have been much higher than 50%.

Is It Tuesday Already?

John Into The Wild Krakauer's latest book sounds like it's going to be a life-giving tonic to our betters in the MSM. They are, as you know bitterly disappointed that the whole 'rape culture' narrative they've been trying to peddle has been dealt one setback after another in recent months. But now:

"Missoula", which came out on April 21, was not supposed to be published for some time, according to the New York Times, but Krakauer decided to release it after Rolling Stone published and then retracted a story about alleged sexual assault at the University of Virginia.

Yes, we must beat some life into the dead horse. But even though liberals are ecstatic, one Amazon reviewer notes:

The bulk of this book focuses on the stories of two women, Allison Huguet was was raped by Beau Donaldson--he has admitted the crime--and Cecilia Washburn (a pseudonym) who alleges she was raped by Jordan Johnson, who was found not guilty of the alleged crime in a court of law.

Plus, Missoula's incidence of rape is lower than the national average. That's hardly a rape culture.

Krakauer's solutions call for greatly reduced due process rights for those accused of rape and looser standards of evidence for the university administration boards. Which, by the way, he insists should be given even more power and authority to adjudicate campus rape cases and mete out punishment to those found guilty. After all, there's no possibility that such a system could ever be corrupted or abused.


Pamphlets

If you want some short, provocative reads, there is an absolute crap ton of pamphlet-length (15-25 pages) essays by a variety of conservative writers you can download to your Kindle readers for 99 cents each. Here are a few examples:

How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them: 11 Rules for Winning the Argument by Ben Shapiro

Stolen History: How the Palestinians and Their Allies Attack Israel's Right to Exist by Erasing Its Past by David Meir Levi.

Government Unions: How They Rob the Tax Payer, Terrorize Workers, and Threaten Our Democracy by Matthew Vadum.

Islam: Religion of Bigots by Robert Spencer. Spencer has quite a few of these pamphlets published.

The Muslim Brotherhood in the Obama Administration by Frank Gaffney

Why Nazism Was Socialism and Why Socialism Is Totalitarian by George Reisman

also by Reisman, Labor Unions, Thugs, and Storm Troopers.

And of course David Horowitz cranks out these pamphlets like a monkey on crack. Here are three of his titles:

Why Israel is the Victim

Fight Fire With Fire

Barack Obama's Rules for Revolution: The Alinsky Model

And there's a lot more.


In Defense of Fareed Zakaria

Aaron MacLean's review of the new book by Fareed Zakaria, In Defense of A Liberal Education starts out like this:

Just as some journalists have come to admire the Clinton family because, and not in spite, of the total lack of integrity apparent in their careers, so I have come to admire the writings of Fareed Zakaria because, and not in spite, of the total absence of shame manifest in their composition.

Ha ha. The rest of the review is equally complimentary.

Zakaria is such a gasbag, he even made TNR's most overrated thinkers list back in the day.


Books By Morons

I probably should have a 'books by friends of morons' section, but in one of yesterday's threads, moron commenter RedMindBlueState wanted to take the opportunity to shamelessly plug the first novel of an old and dear friend. So, without further ado, here is In a World Just Right, by Jen Brooks:

Ever since coming out of a coma as a kid, [Jonathan Aubrey] has been able to create alternate worlds. Worlds where he is a superhero, or a ladies' man, or simply a better version of himself. That's the world he's been escaping to most since sophomore year, a world where he has everything he doesn't have in real life: friends, a place of honor on the track team, passing grades, and most importantly, Kylie Simms as his girlfriend.

Sounds great. What could possibly go wrong?

But when Jonathan confuses his worlds senior year and tries to kiss the real Kylie Simms, everything unravels.

Oops.


What I'm Reading

This week I decided to go old school with The Big Sleep, Raymond Chandler's classic, hard-boiled detective story featuring Philip Marlowe.

...The rain had started. I ran for it, with the wrapped book under my arm. My car was on a side street pointing at the boulevard almost opposite Geigerís store. I was well sprinkled before I got there. I tumbled into the car and ran both windows up and wiped my parcel off with my handkerchief. Then I opened it up.

I knew about what it would be, of course. A heavy book, well bound, handsomely printed in handset type on fine paper. Larded with full-page arty photographs. Photos and letterpress were alike of an indescribable filth. The book was not new. Dates were stamped on the front endpaper, in and out dates. A rent book. A lending library of elaborate smut.

I rewrapped the book and locked it up behind the seat. A racket like that, out in the open on the boulevard, seemed to mean plenty of protection. I sat there and poisoned myself with cigarette smoke and listened to the rain and thought about it.

I put up an extended quote to give you a good example of Chandler's writing, which I think is quite good. At least, the style fits well with the characters and story.

I had to look up "letterpress", a term I was unfamiliar with. For those of you who are ignorant like me, it's basically a type of relief printing in reverse, i.e., the inked letters are indented into the paper. Like this, for example. Looks all high-class and hoity-toity, doesn't it?

Anyway, so Marlowe had acquired himself a fancy-shmancy book of pr0n. What he says about it is interesting. He talks about it the way we would child pron ("indescribable filth"), even though later on, it seems apparent that the pictures are just nude shots. Of women. Sounds pretty tepid by today's standards. And second, he surmises that the existence of this book means that there is "plenty of protection" behind it, that is, the authorities have somehow been persuaded not to do anything about this obviously illegal activity.

The Big Sleep was first published in 1939. The world has changed a lot since then. I sometimes find myself wishing we could go back to those days where pr0n was rare and hard to find, and in order to get it, you had to know someone who knew someone who knew someone, etc. Obviously, there's always going to be pr0n, just like there's always going to be prostitution, but the fact that it's available to everyone at the click of a mouse button can't be healthy.

___________


So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:01 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Am reading "The Land of Steady Habits," by Ted Thompson.

Ted's mom and dad are friends of ours.

A lot like Updike.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at April 26, 2015 09:04 AM (U6f54)

2 Finished Champlain's Dream, by David Hackett Fisher. It's a really interesting read about the settling of Canada.

Even more interesting, it shows that Champlain was a real leader, and how far short our current 'leaders' fall. Even the Indians, a completely foreign culture recognized him for what he was, and treated him with love and affection.

Posted by: pep at April 26, 2015 09:12 AM (LAe3v)

3 Just got done reading "One Second After," by William R. Forstchen.

Posted by: Hanoverfist at April 26, 2015 09:13 AM (YCG8H)

4 Reading a biography of Napoleon by Will and Ariel Durant and working my way through the Old Testament.

Posted by: joncelli at April 26, 2015 09:15 AM (ENczY)

5 And it's sunny out so yard work cries out for my attention.

Posted by: joncelli at April 26, 2015 09:15 AM (ENczY)

6 After finishing Barry Goldwater's autobiography this week (and thus having my admiration for the guy rekindled), I'm just getting into Conrad Black's bio of FDR, a book nearly as massive -- and overblown -- as an Ayn Rand novel.

Black is an interesting case. He writes for National Review, but treats ol' Franklin D. with the kind of fawning adoration too many people nowadays reserve for Choom Boy. It's pathetic, really; he records the many, many instances of Roosevelt playing fast and loose with the truth when talking about himself, and (so far) seems pretty honest about crediting others for the alleged Great Things that came out of his rather ordinary mind. And yet, Black continues to pant about his subject's greatness. Makes no sense, really.

Roosevelt II was a decent politician, but also as big a hack as ever came from a privileged, protected background. He was sure as hell no great intellect. From what I can see -- and, honestly, knew before picking up the book -- every good thing he can be credited with (some of which turned out to be disasters for the country) was more than counterbalanced by some act of liberal idiocy we are, in one way or another, still paying for today.

Don't know if I'll finish the book, or set it aside for some other time. It depends, I think, on whether I find any Elmore Leonard novels in my next trip to the Book Barn....

Posted by: MrScribbler at April 26, 2015 09:18 AM (P8YHq)

7 Read the first 5 Liturgical Mystery books recommended here (thank you) on the book thread. Enjoyed them a lot. A nice distraction from politics and the author is a big Chandler fan, too.

Posted by: Ranger at April 26, 2015 09:19 AM (jEZIQ)

8 On a few morons recommendations, I'm reading-

"The Girl With All The Gifts".


I'm about half-way through and so far I like it.

The novel starts out so strongly with the little girl in sharp focus, that I find the middle section to be a bit,

eh, unfocussed so far as it moves the girl to the sidelines.

The writing is flatter as well.

My guess is that the book was deemed too short and some of this stuff added to bulk things out

But, again, I'm enjoying the book and waiting to see what happens next-

though I think I know where it's going now.


The story is a zombie variation so if you're tired of that whole thang, you might want to give it a pass.

Otherwise, a fun read so far.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 26, 2015 09:23 AM (KUa85)

9 This week I finished reading the previously recommended Lion's Gate: On the Front Lines of the Six Day War by Steven Pressfield. Pressfield describes the book as "'hybrid' history". It is based on over 300 hours of interviews of men and women who fought for Israel in 1967. The interviews were done about 35 years after the events. It's a story about bravery, audaciousness, and the luck, both good and bad, of war.

I vividly remember the war and the weeks leading up to it. I was a student at UCLA. Then it was not a den of anti-Semitism as it is now, but rather the opposite. A large number of Jewish students, mostly from LA's west side, attended there. There was a much smaller number of Arab students. Demonstrations by both sides escalated into shouting matches which in turn led to pushing and shoving. The campus cops were kept busy. The celebrations of joy when Israel won the war were very moving. Israel would continue to survive. This book brought back those feelings of pride and joy.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 26, 2015 09:24 AM (eLZwy)

10 the TEN commandments by Dennis Prager
Done as a text book. Questions at the end of chapters. Very good for what it is. Very slim book. Less than most pamphlets. Read it in less than an hour. Made me want to research what he said. Interesting thing was that the statements from God were to be followed to create a just nation. Not justified as an individual moral code. I may have read too much into his words. He may have not meant to imply that. $11.11 tax and free shipping from BN (BN card gets the nominally free shipping). About ten cents a page.

Posted by: Huggy at April 26, 2015 09:26 AM (PGh+Q)

11 The second book I read this week was Citizen of the Galaxy by Robert Heinlein. It's a story of a young slave boy sold to a beggar who ends up fighting the slave trade. It's great story with solid ethical concepts. The book is the eleventh in Heinlein's Juveniles series.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 26, 2015 09:31 AM (eLZwy)

12 Posted by: Zoltan at April 26, 2015 09:24 AM (eLZwy)

Anti-Semitism had not yet supplanted those quaint ideas of freedom and the struggle against tyranny that Israel represents.

14 years later when I arrived at Berkeley, I was shocked to discover that anti-Semitism was alive and well.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 26, 2015 09:31 AM (Zu3d9)

13 Empires of Light by J. Jonnes. Chronicles the race to bring electricity to America. Edison, Westinghouse and Tesla all vying to become 19th century titans. The original AC- DC!!

Posted by: jd at April 26, 2015 09:31 AM (3XgVe)

14 A must listen to this week: Thucydides on BBC 4 Radio. Adapted by Tom Holland, somehow to an hour and fifteen minutes, which means only the highlights. Still, it's Thucydides, man.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05t2q94

Posted by: keninnorcal at April 26, 2015 09:34 AM (On0/h)

15 LA Public Library audiobook downloads:

Last week I finished Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth and this week I'm listening to Malcolm Gladwell's David and Goliath.

Posted by: baldilocks at April 26, 2015 09:34 AM (t2Kll)

16 Read the first 5 Liturgical Mystery books recommended here (thank you) on the book thread. Enjoyed them a lot. A nice distraction from politics and the author is a big Chandler fan, too

Yes, it was the 'Liturgical Mysteries' series that kindled my interest in reading Chandler.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 26, 2015 09:36 AM (akz6P)

17 @9 Zoltan > "Lion's Gate: On the Front Lines of the Six Day War" by Steven Pressfield.

Agree completely. Excellent book.

I was also in college at the time. Had an Egyptian housemate 67-68. Nice guy, very bright. Went absolutely unhinged whenever Israel was mentioned. Could not rationally discuss. Completely bonkers.

Also had a staunchly pro-Israel housemate. Made for some interesting "debates."

Posted by: doug at April 26, 2015 09:40 AM (qYWZ5)

18 Last week I finished Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth...

Posted by: baldilocks at April 26, 2015 09:34 AM


Read by Warner Oland????

Posted by: MrScribbler at April 26, 2015 09:40 AM (P8YHq)

19 Black is an interesting case. He writes for National Review, but treats ol' Franklin D. with the kind of fawning adoration too many people nowadays reserve for Choom Boy

If I remember correctly, when Diana West's book 'American Betrayal' came out, Black was one of the ones on our side that really got his panties in a bunch over it. That's because West pretty much proves what a feckless nincompoop Roosevelt was, and Black just can't abide that. Same with Horowitz and the frontpagemag.com crowd, many of whom grew up as red diaper babies and never got over their absolute worship of FDR.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 26, 2015 09:43 AM (akz6P)

20 Unease at Clinton Foundation Over Finances and Ambitions
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and AMY CHOZICK AUG. 13, 2013

Soon after the 10th anniversary of the foundation bearing his name, Bill Clinton met with a small group of aides and two lawyers from Simpson Thacher Bartlett. Two weeks of interviews with Clinton Foundation executives and former employees had led the lawyers to some unsettling conclusions.

The review echoed criticism of Mr. Clinton's early years in the White House: For all of its successes, the Clinton Foundation had become a sprawling concern, supervised by a rotating board of old Clinton hands, vulnerable to distraction and threatened by conflicts of interest. It ran multimillion-dollar deficits for several years, despite vast amounts of money flowing in.

Posted by: Booker T Washigton at April 26, 2015 09:44 AM (e8kgV)

21 Speaking of zombies-


If anyone else is still watching "Mad Men"-

don't you think the last episode last year was a perfectly good ending to the whole series?

And these last 5 episodes are just the characters wandering around like zombies doing the same old things the same old way-

with zip character growth like...(wait for it)...zombies?


Posted by: naturalfake at April 26, 2015 09:45 AM (KUa85)

22 Something Rich and Strange

Ron Rash

Author


A Fine Read

If you can get your nose out of the Raw Footage of Baltimore Riots



Posted by: Piece Prize Winner Last Night at April 26, 2015 09:47 AM (/WmRg)

23 Decided to peruse my bookshelves for something instead of traipsing off to the library or Amazon (sorry Ace).

Found "Five Years Among the Congo Cannibals" by Herbert Ward (1891). It was on the old homestead's bookshelves for decades and I swiped it for its wonderfully old school title and the profuse illustrations. I've just started and within three pages the author has been disinherited, left England for a steamer for New Zealand, worked as a stock-rider, circus performer, and miner, puked his way around the Horn, returned to Plymouth, signed on as a cadet, been stationed in Borneo, and lived among the Dyak head hunters. Or, as he calls it, "A rough but wholesome apprenticeship".

I just noticed this, signed in the flyleaf: "with this author's kind regards, to A.A.H. Carlston, Shepherds Hill House, August 9th, 92"

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 26, 2015 09:52 AM (KH1sk)

24 This week I've been rereading a couple of books. One was Andy Weir's _The Martian_, which is still a great book (soon to be a Major Motion Picture, too).

It's interesting to realize that if the Hugo Awards didn't have obsolete eligibility rules which kept Weir's book off the ballot, there wouldn't be any controversy this year at all about the awards (at least not the one for Best Novel) because _The Martian_ would be the obvious, overwhelming favorite.

The other one I've been reading is _Around the World With the U.S. Navy: A Reporter's Travels_, by Bradley Peniston. It's from Naval Institute Press, so it's pretty rah-rah. The book was published in 1999, and it's amazing how much has changed since then.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 26, 2015 09:52 AM (u6kkk)

25 Lion's Gate: I haven't read it but intend to. In '67 I was a politically active H.S.kid and we discussed the war during the current events portion of history class. I remember the consensus of the class was Israel was in the right. Good times. Good teacher.

Posted by: Hank at April 26, 2015 09:55 AM (Qgapy)

26 If I remember correctly, when Diana West's book 'American Betrayal' came out, Black was one of the ones on our side that really got his panties in a bunch over it. That's because West pretty much proves what a feckless nincompoop Roosevelt was, and Black just can't abide that. Same with Horowitz and the frontpagemag.com crowd, many of whom grew up as red diaper babies and never got over their absolute worship of FDR.


Posted by: OregonMuse at April 26, 2015 09:43 AM (akz6P)

Not just when the book came out. Just a couple of weeks ago convicted felon Conrad Black had yet another inaccurate and dishonest attack on West over at NRO. In fact, NR seems to have assumed the permanent role of ideological enforcer when it comes to West, much as it did under Buckley against the Birchers. But the Birchers were (mostly) right, as is West. It's no accident that Coulter and Steyn chose to separate themselves from the flagship of conservatism.

Posted by: Emmet Milbarge at April 26, 2015 09:57 AM (nFdGS)

27 Trimegistus, I just got "Around the World With the U.S. Navy" on Amazon for 89 cents -- thus violating my vow, stated mere minutes ago, to not purchase any books.

Thanks!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 26, 2015 09:58 AM (KH1sk)

28 Finished "Death of a Citizen", the first Matt Helm book I mentioned last week. Hadn't read it in many tears and forgot just how good it was. Now I'm eying my stack of aging paperbacks and thinking of going through the series in order.

On a totally different plane, I read "Mr. Bliss" by JRR Tolkien. This was a book he wrote and illustrated for his young children. The story is silly and charming and the illustrations are a delight. Makes me wish I had a young child to read it to.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 09:59 AM (FvdPb)

29 I just started reading the Broken God Machine by Christopher Beucheler(sp?). It's a post apocalyptic scifi-ish book set thousands of years in the future where men are back to living in a hunter/gatherer type of existence without knowledge of technology. There is one machine that still works but it is broken and kills anything that comes close to it instead of welcoming people like it was originally made to do. There is a tribe of human like creatures that worship it like a god and make human sacrifices to it while trying to figure out how it works in order to get past it. So far it's kept my interest.

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 26, 2015 10:02 AM (xVgrA)

30 Got all but two of the detective quiz questions correct. I know too damn much about the genre.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:05 AM (FvdPb)

31 Read Cold Days by Jim Butcher, #14 in the Dresden Files series. Very good with the usual action and humor. I'm a bit tired of them by now, but objectively it was top notch. Ready now to read #15 for the Hugos.

Listened to In Enemy Hands (Honor Harrington #7) by David Weber, pretty interesting story where her enemies get their hands on her. Interesting cliff-hanger ending so plan to check out the sequel soon.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 26, 2015 10:12 AM (FVt/M)

32 A must listen to this week: Thucydides on BBC 4
Radio.
Posted by: keninnorcal at April 26, 2015 09:34 AM (On0/h)


The one the BBC did on Herodotus years and years ago got me into finding the book and reading it.
If you can find the time and the interest that book is really worth a read.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 26, 2015 10:12 AM (t//F+)

33 Decent beach book: David Baldacci "The Escape."

I find Baldacci to be wildly variable in quality. This is one of his better efforts. The Puller character returns with some very surprising plot twists.

Posted by: doug at April 26, 2015 10:15 AM (qYWZ5)

34 I am read Dreamz of My Father for the seventeent time in honor of our historic post racial first president.

Posted by: Mary Cloggenstein Brattleboro Vermont at April 26, 2015 10:15 AM (z90SC)

35 I'm continuing with Canterbury Tales but taking my time so as to savor the descriptions and sometimes subtle layers of meaning. One surprise: I understand more of the archaic words than I expected. When that happens I try to figure out why I know the word. Is it one I've encountered before, some dim knowledge of a Latin or Germanic root, perhaps a memory from a prior life? It's silly, but this kind of thing bugs me even though I'm glad to have the (apparent) knowledge.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:16 AM (FvdPb)

36 19
If I remember correctly, when Diana West's book 'American Betrayal' came out, Black was one of the ones on our side that really got his panties in a bunch over it. That's because West pretty much proves what a feckless nincompoop Roosevelt was, and Black just can't abide that. Same with Horowitz and the frontpagemag.com crowd, many of whom grew up as red diaper babies and never got over their absolute worship of FDR.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 26, 2015 09:43 AM (akz6P)



Yep, although "communist dupe" might be more accurate than "feckless nincompoop".

Posted by: rickl at April 26, 2015 10:16 AM (sdi6R)

37 I finished the Wool omnibus and I'm now reading a book about John Hunt Morgan.

Posted by: NCKate at April 26, 2015 10:20 AM (QtJ1S)

38 Been reading mostly suggestions by fellow morons. Finished the Northworld trilogy which was slightly disappointing, 2/3 of the way through the Correia Grimoir trilogy and I'm currently blowing through Ready Player One which is fun for a child of the 80s like myself as long as you can ignore the occasional liberal claptrap that enabled it to get rave reviews from the NY Times.

Posted by: NJRob at April 26, 2015 10:22 AM (mXe2q)

39 I was back at two Half-Price Book outlets (riding herd on the Daughter Unit, who wanted to go back for a pair of comic book compendia she had been thumbing through two weeks at when I did an author gig at one of them for Drop Everything And Read)... the two that she wanted were gone, already, and she loudly regretted not having bought them at the time.

Anyway, I stumbled into a pair of fascinating-looking books - and bought them, each for $10 - to add to my library of reference books for writing about the lives of women on the 19th century frontier. One is "Her Name Was Ann - A Pioneer Teacher in Texas" by Annie Mae Morriss, and published by the Naylor Company, a small local publisher specializing in local history. It's autographed by the author, too. (Originally priced at $75, as I discovered when peeling off a series of price stickers, and then marked down three times.) The other is a first edition (alas, without dust jacket, which renders it much less valuable) of a memoir of growing up on a ranch in New Mexico -- "No Life for a Lady" by Agnes Morley Cleaveland, which was apparently a best-seller when it first came out in 1941, and still seems to be very well thought of by local history buffs historians. I've started reading this one - it's very lively and quite fascinating.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at April 26, 2015 10:22 AM (95iDF)

40 Not a book, but I have been re-reading grandma's old letter and stuff. It came to me in an old hat box. Letter to and from friends before, during and after WWII. Quite interesting and I learned things I never new. She was NOT a fan of FDR.

Posted by: Infidel at April 26, 2015 10:23 AM (qu2uc)

41 Not a book, but I have been re-reading grandma's old letter and stuff. It came to me in an old hat box. Letter to and from friends before, during and after WWII. Quite interesting and I learned things I never new. She was NOT a fan of FDR.

Posted by: Infidel at April 26, 2015 10:23 AM (qu2uc)

42 JTB, you might enjoy "The History of English" podcast. On iTunes and at historyofEnglishpodcast dot com.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (yxw0r)

43 Wut?

Posted by: Infidel at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (qu2uc)

44 Wut?

Posted by: Infidel at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (qu2uc)

45 Wut?

Posted by: Infidel at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (qu2uc)

46 No reading this week, all writing and editing.

I noticed something strange about what some Authors do. I was looking at a book on Amaon by a woman who flitters in and out of a Facebook group I'm involved in. It has a current release date.Then I went to good reads and found a year old release date and after further investigation found yet an older release date.

Also on Goodreads she has over 100 reviews, only 20 have text the rest are just stars. I look at other ratings including my own and about 2/3 of the ratings have actual text reviews.

Are there games being played here? if so what games are there. Especially with the release date.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (KbNXw)

47 Mary C, I understand the section in DoMF where he fixes his father's inept carpentry and makes living birds out of mud on a Sunday was exceptionally touching.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (t//F+)

48 7
Read the first 5 Liturgical Mystery books recommended here (thank you)
on the book thread. Enjoyed them a lot. A nice distraction from
politics and the author is a big Chandler fan, too.

Me too...read them all. I especially liked "The Christmas Cantata", I think it's the only non-murder mystery.

Posted by: trainer at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (7EbAY)

49 Must get Donuts for the Fam. Can I get anyone anything while I'm out?

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 10:26 AM (KbNXw)

50 OSP, I'd like a maple-bacon doughnut, please.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 26, 2015 10:28 AM (KH1sk)

51 49 Must get Donuts for the Fam. Can I get anyone anything while I'm out?

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 10:26 AM (KbNXw)

I really shouldn't as I've finally managed to fully regain the 20lbs. I lost two years ago. I has a sad!
But, I appreciate the offer.....

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 26, 2015 10:29 AM (xVgrA)

52 Yes,Conrad Black,and many others of his generation,have a kind of hero worship for FDR.I was reading Max Hastings Retribution and one liitle blurb really stood out as disturbing to me.He tells of a pilot in the Pacific hearing of FDR's death and being so affected " he was our leader from when I was 10 years old" (paraphreasing).Disturbing that an American thought of a president as "our leader",or my leader.Combine that with his portrait being in so many homes and him being essentially president for life and,well,you know what I'm getting at.

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 10:30 AM (mGBKM)

53 You got it, I'm out!

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 10:31 AM (KbNXw)

54 as long as you can ignore the occasional liberal claptrap that enabled it to get rave reviews from the NY Times.
Posted by: NJRob at April 26, 2015 10:22 AM (mXe2q)

*************

I loved "A Prayer for Owen Meany," but only because Irving keeps said claptrap in separate chunks that I could just ignore.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at April 26, 2015 10:31 AM (yxw0r)

55 CNN

Reliable Sources, their show about the media. Going to talk about Nerd Prom and Brian Williams


On today's panel?

Dan Rather. That's right. Mr false but true" is going to discuss the fabulist Brian Williams

Posted by: ThunderB at April 26, 2015 10:31 AM (zOTsN)

56 42 ... Thanks Bob, I'll check it out.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:37 AM (FvdPb)

57 3 Just got done reading "One Second After," by William R. Forstchen

---
Enjoyed that one and I still think the future is going to be ugly when the power grid collapses. But I'm expecting a world more like Flashback where the masses are hooked on drugs to ignore what a disgrace our nation has become.

Posted by: NJRob at April 26, 2015 10:38 AM (mXe2q)

58
35 I'm continuing with Canterbury Tales but taking my time so as to savor the descriptions and sometimes subtle layers of meaning. One surprise: I understand more of the archaic words than I expected. When that happens I try to figure out why I know the word.
Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:16 AM (FvdPb)







Literary penis jokes from Teh Horde.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at April 26, 2015 10:39 AM (VDCWC)

59 I loved "A Prayer for Owen Meany," but only because Irving keeps said claptrap in separate chunks that I could just ignore.

----
Pretty much the same. Almost feels like the author throws the junk in as an afterthought so they can get the approval of the "right crowd."

Posted by: NJRob at April 26, 2015 10:40 AM (mXe2q)

60 57 Drugs or more likely permanently,surgically attached to their electronic devices.

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 10:41 AM (mGBKM)

61 Sgt Mom, did I suggest Conversations With Pioneer Women by Fred Lockley to you? It is interviews with pioneers in Oregon done when most of them were in their 80's.

It is available on Amazon, but there are a lot of older printings on Alibris.com too.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 26, 2015 10:44 AM (t//F+)

62 OSP, when will be seeing Golden Angel for e-book? Thought I'd seen a comment a month or so ago it was imminent.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 26, 2015 10:47 AM (FVt/M)

63 Do you ever get in the mood to read about a certain subject or era? I was going through my book shelves and realized I have several books about the founding and use of the US Navy during the Revolution: Six Frigates, The Rhode Island Campaign, Give Me A Fast Ship, Washington's Secret Navy and others. Part of the attraction is they deal with my home town in Rhode Island and how, in many ways, it hadn't changed in almost 200 years. Plus the adventures and personalities are exciting on their own.

This also made me realize That I have years worth of excellent reading available on my shelves and e-readers even if I don't visit the library or book stores for the rest of the decade. I like having that much treasure already available.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:47 AM (FvdPb)

64 Throw Them All Out was an excellent expose. I bet the Clinton Cash book is just as well - researched.

Posted by: @votermom at April 26, 2015 10:48 AM (cbfNE)

65 Max Hastings is a plagiarist:
http://20committee.com/2015/03/30/plagiarism-is-not-cool/

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 26, 2015 10:51 AM (AVEe1)

66 I'm almost through quicksilver (Neal Stephenson) so must decide whether to continue the series this rainy day or select a faster read. I've enjoyed this book but I usually read less in late spring and summer. I've really enjoyed reading about all the early natural philosophers.

Posted by: PaleRider at April 26, 2015 10:51 AM (7w/kf)

67 58 ... IllTemperedCur, that is a possibility. I am often astonished at the diverse and deep knowledge of the Horde.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:52 AM (FvdPb)

68 Finished re-reading Princess of Mars and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. As good as ever. Reading a Comptia A+ study guide. Thought I'd take a few certification exams and make myself more attractive to employers. Up next is Monster Hunter Alpha.

Posted by: Achilles at April 26, 2015 10:52 AM (TpeIH)

69 I'm about halfway through "Dead Mountain" about the Dyaltov Pass incident in Russia in 1959. A pretty good read so far.

Posted by: Null at April 26, 2015 10:57 AM (xjpRj)

70 65 Yeah,sad.

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 10:57 AM (mGBKM)

71 Zakaria citations including a book for toddlers? Hilarious.

Posted by: Sunni LeBeouf at April 26, 2015 10:58 AM (cIoI4)

72 Thanks to Vic for mentioning on Friday that Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Tales series was available on Kindle for 1.99 each. That ended last night but I was able to get the first six books in the series for less than 12 bucks. Mrs. JTB was kind enough to bring it to my attention. (True love, there.) Usually I miss these deals by a day.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 10:59 AM (FvdPb)

73 Being pretty annoyed at the repetitiveness in Harry Turtledove's Homeward Bound. Including a completely ludicrous dialog with the Emperor.

Posted by: DaveA at April 26, 2015 11:00 AM (DL2i+)

74 73 I grew tired of Turtledove after reading a few of his books.

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 11:01 AM (mGBKM)

75 "Had an Egyptian housemate 67-68. Nice guy, very bright. Went absolutely unhinged whenever Israel was mentioned."

Islam says God loves Muslims and hates Jews. Jewish state slaps the piss out of Muslims every time they fight.

This is irreconcilable. The best Muslims, and especially Arabs, have managed is "Israel is in league with Iblis" and "Elders of Zion Conspiracy with the backing of the United States."

But even with that sort of faith based, conspiratorial explanation they still twitch to learn that Arabs in Israel are treated better than Arabs in Arab nations. Most simply deny it's possible. Obviously.

Posted by: Apostate at April 26, 2015 11:01 AM (4pWO0)

76 Not a good reading week for me, but think I'll be getting the Clinton book by Schweitzer after watching part of the Fox special last. The cronyism/scam they've been running is just boggling. The kind of book to keep handy (like the 9/11 report) when Leftism rewrites history.

Posted by: Lizzy at April 26, 2015 11:03 AM (2TN4k)

77 Chandler is a good historian of old (1930s) Los Angeles in the way that Dashiell Hammett was on San Francisco (Maltese Falcon). I have spent some time figuring out his locations.

Posted by: Mike K at April 26, 2015 11:04 AM (5namt)

78 "I'm almost through quicksilver (Neal Stephenson) so must decide whether to continue the series"

I really enjoyed that trilogy. Once. I re-read a few years later and it wasn't nearly as fun because the sarcasm and absurdist surprises were no longer surprises.

It does serve as a primer on the Enlightenment, though, if you're interested in such things. It's fun to see a bunch of Renaissance men living and behaving as people. Gave me an appreciation of Leibniz.

Posted by: Apostate at April 26, 2015 11:06 AM (4pWO0)

79 93% on the detective quiz. I guess I've read a lot of mysteries. I should re-read Nero Wolfe and see how those have held up.

Posted by: Gem at April 26, 2015 11:11 AM (c+gwp)

80 As a book to read along with "Lion's Gate" by Steven Pressfield, is the book "Six Days of War" by Michael Oren. This is a totally factual book chronicling the build-up to war, what were some of the things happening on both sides, and the aftermath.

"Lions'Gate" is interesting in that it has many first person accounts (some of the same people that show up in Oren's book, naturally). "Six Days of War" conveys a lot of history and the shape of the conflict, that makes "Lion's Gate" a lot more comprehensible.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at April 26, 2015 11:16 AM (+1T7c)

81 OSP, when will be seeing Golden Angel for e-book? Thought I'd seen a comment a month or so ago it was imminent.
Posted by: waelse1 at April 26, 2015 10:47 AM (FVt/M)

Long story, short answer. Around the first of the month.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:22 AM (KbNXw)

82 Re-reading Nero Wolf, like Sherlock Holmes, never gets old. Even when the mystery surprise is gone, the characters and dialogue still sparkle.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 11:23 AM (FvdPb)

83 Adapted by Tom Holland, somehow to an hour and fifteen minutes, which means only the highlights. Still, it's Thucydides, man.

-
I quite liked Holland's book Rubicon.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 26, 2015 11:24 AM (txTIH)

84 Not a good reading week for me, but think I'll be getting the Clinton book by Schweitzer after watching part of the Fox special last. The cronyism/scam they've been running is just boggling. The kind of book to keep handy (like the 9/11 report) when Leftism rewrites history.
Posted by: Lizzy at April 26, 2015 11:03 AM (2TN4k)


I'm thing about getting it too. The white house press secretary said it best, there is no concrete proof but we convict murderers on circumstantial evidence. If you follow the time lines, especially when it comes to the Uranium deals. It's pretty damning.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:26 AM (KbNXw)

85 And Mr. Bush also appeared to work blue in the post-presidency. He told how President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia made fun of his small dog, Barney, by telling the American president, "You want to see a real dog?"

Mr. Putin called over his large dog, which the Russian leader apparently described as larger and more powerful. Mr. Bush recounted that he later told the same story to the Canadian prime minister, Stephen Harper, who he said replied, "You're lucky all he did was show you his dog."

Posted by: Lassie at April 26, 2015 11:26 AM (e8kgV)

86 Andy Weir's The Martian totally deserved a Hugo. If they are going to change things up (and if you are not aware, there is MUCH wailing and gnashing of teeth in SJW-Hugoland lately) I think they ought to have a three-year and five-year category. It takes books a while to get out and get popular these days, and one year of eligibility is not enough.

Oh, and speaking of the Hugo controversy-- remember that a Worldcon supporting membership is a mere $40, and gets you the voter packet. Electronic copies of most, if not all, of the Hugo nominees. https://sasquan.swoc.us/sasquan/reg.php

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at April 26, 2015 11:27 AM (GQdlU)

87 O/T I spent the last half-hour watching Georgie Stepalloverus trying his hardest to defend Billary. He had Donna Brazille in to help out.
They both failed miserably.

Posted by: Hank at April 26, 2015 11:31 AM (Qgapy)

88 Thirty years ago, or so, a friend who was moving to California game me a 20 volume set of detective stories from the '20s, '30s and '40s. I gave them to my nephew's baseball team garage sale about 15 years ago. Wish I had them now. The stories were really well done and I'd read them again.

Posted by: huerfano at April 26, 2015 11:32 AM (bynk/)

89 Posted by: Sabrina Chase at April 26, 2015 11:27 AM (GQdlU)

Hi Sabrina. I had Brad Torgerson on my radio show. What a great guy.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:33 AM (KbNXw)

90
"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."



Groucho Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at April 26, 2015 11:33 AM (0HooB)

91 FDR worship. Everyone alive is pretty much either descended from serfs or descended from kings (from kings not queens; eg bastards). Survival of the fittest for serfs would select people who wanted and needed to worship their king. People who hated FDR are descended from kings.

Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:35 AM (PGh+Q)

92 I'm reading British war diaries. "Nella Last's War," kept by a Barrow-in-Furness housewife between 1939 and 1945, and "Few Eggs and No Oranges," by Vere Hodgson - a London teacher and social worker, same period.

Their styles are very different - Nella writes reams of stuff, her worry about her younger son in the Army, her work at the Women's Voluntary Service (the canteen they run for soldiers, the endless dolls and blankets she makes for the hospitals), keeping chickens on the lawn. Vere is younger and more serene, has no family in London but visits mother and sister in Birmingham when she can; reports on the Blitz almost matter-of-factly.

Vere, by the way, taught in Italy for three years, and one of her pupils was Mussolini's older daughter, Edda:

"She had very peasant contours when I knew her...She remained until the end of term, and never returned. She disliked the English because we did not make a fuss of her...in Berlin arrangements were more to her liking."

Fascinating stuff.

Posted by: Annalucia at April 26, 2015 11:36 AM (a5bF3)

93 "It's fun to see a bunch of Renaissance men living and behaving as people. Gave me an appreciation of Leibniz." Almost exactly my thoughts, apostate. I'm not concerned with the book/series not holding up on reread. I used to read almost every good novel at least twice back in my teens and twenties but the last series I reread was Sabrina Chase's Sequoyah trilogy. So many interesting books out there that even ones I quite enjoy don't get reread these days except I devoured that trilogy so I reread it to pick up the bits I'd missed in my enthusiastic rush.

Posted by: PaleRider at April 26, 2015 11:37 AM (7w/kf)

94 I have five dead tree copies of Golden Angel that were printed before the final round of edits went through. That's why the Kindle is late. If anyone here wants a copy, the errors don't effect the story, friend and IM me your address on my Facebook Author Page AuthorJackJuly, and I'll send you a copy.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:39 AM (KbNXw)

95 I think the reason most young Ukrainian women are visually stunning is because that is the only kind of person that could get food during all the pillages.

Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:40 AM (PGh+Q)

96 I think the reason most young Ukrainian women are visually stunning is because that is the only kind of person that could get food during all the pillages.
Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:40 AM (PGh+Q)

You know that theory could have some merit.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:42 AM (KbNXw)

97 "Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:35 AM (PGh+Q)"

Evolution, I am *literally* descended from serfs (it wasn't abolished in Austria-Hungary until 184 and I've been a Republican since I was fifteen.

Posted by: Annalucia at April 26, 2015 11:42 AM (a5bF3)

98 That should be eighteen-forty-eight.

Posted by: Annalucia at April 26, 2015 11:43 AM (a5bF3)

99 Well, back to writing. Big scene I've been picking at for a week. I'll probably end up having Anna Puma massage it. Later Rons.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:45 AM (KbNXw)

100 The novel starts out so strongly with the little girl in sharp focus, that I find the middle section to be a bit,



eh, unfocussed so far as it moves the girl to the sidelines.



The writing is flatter as well.



My guess is that the book was deemed too short and some of this stuff added to bulk things out



But, again, I'm enjoying the book and waiting to see what happens next-



though I think I know where it's going now.





The story is a zombie variation so if you're tired of that whole thang, you might want to give it a pass.



Otherwise, a fun read so far.





Posted by: naturalfake at April 26, 2015 09:23 AM (KUa85)




The book was actually originally a short story, Iphigenia in Aulis which was expanded into the full novel. The original story ended with the escape from the military base, so your feelings about the book are spot on.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at April 26, 2015 11:45 AM (q20+R)

101 The nice thing about evolution theories is that they are very adaptable. Two kinds of serfs, one worships king other pretends to worship king. :-)

Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:46 AM (PGh+Q)

102 My aunt, amateur genealogist, just handed me a book on my father's family history. 250 pages of family. The thought of it all has me a bit overwhelmed. When I get around to reading it, there probably should be an extra bottle or three of rum in the cupboard.
They were poor Irish. You know it's a tragedy.

Posted by: fairweatherbill at April 26, 2015 11:47 AM (xrURQ)

103 @fairweatherbill

Sounds like a gold mine!

Posted by: Apostate at April 26, 2015 11:48 AM (4pWO0)

104 Sgt Mom,

I just got finished working with this SA high school in one of the parades.

http://www.harlandale.net/?PN=AboutUs

The district has a neat history, though it didn't happen on the frontier. The first classes were taught in the Mission San Jose granary, then when they built a one room schoolhouse in 1898, 15 year old teacher Miss Ernestine Edmunds (her family has an interesting history too) rode her big gray horse Gunpowder to school everyday for 10 years, never missing a day.

Anyway, not really your time frame of interest, but your comment reminded me of that teacher and her horse.

Posted by: stace at April 26, 2015 11:49 AM (CoX6k)

105 It's almost noon and it's a gorgeous day outside. Time to conform to societal norms and put some pants on, then head into town and maybe hit the used book store.

See you later, succors!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 26, 2015 11:50 AM (KH1sk)

106 I think the reason most young Ukrainian women are visually stunning is because that is the only kind of person that could get food during all the pillages.
Posted by: Evolution appologist

I've heard similar things about Icelandic women. The Vikings only took the good looking girls with them to help colonize the frontier.

Posted by: fairweatherbill at April 26, 2015 11:50 AM (xrURQ)

107 Re-reading The Great Terror by Robert Conquest, the most up-to-date revised edition, which benefitted from post-Soviet access to people, info, files, etc.

Chilling, depressing, yet usurprising to see how such ridiculous outrageous farces as the show trials often got passing reviews from westerners, even non-fellow travelers.

Also, I'm struck by my indifference to the fate of the accused (the big shots, the Bolsheviks, not the masses swept up in the mass terror whose history is just starting to be covered in the book). I group all of them essentially in the same camp as Nazi leaders, the Khmer Rouge, Mao's commies, Iraqi Ba'athists - the bloodiest criminals of modern history. So, f**k them.

Nice littledelicious side-dishes every now and then. Like how the heroic, noble commies of France - whoseintrepid major contribution to The Resistance is usually touted when discussing the Nazi occupation - were actually, per Moscow's orders and interests, actually quite kissy-face with the German conquerors, to the point that German assent was given to resumption of publication of L'Humanite. Um, up until that whole inconvenient Barbarossa thinggy.

I'm sure therewere French commies who rejected this and opposed the Germans from the outset, but this little tidbit is a nice one to keep on hand for those who don't understand that the divide is freedom vs. totalitarianism, not things like the minimum wage.

Posted by: rhomboid at April 26, 2015 11:52 AM (afQnV)

108 107 The effectiveness of the commie resistances in all countries was overblown.Especially China.Remember,in many cases,the people reporting about these things to the State Department were themselves communist agents.

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 11:54 AM (mGBKM)

109 And of course when France was initially invaded the commies were allied with the Nazis and sabotaged,spread disinformation and defeatism .

Posted by: steevy at April 26, 2015 11:56 AM (mGBKM)

110 Anyone else suddenly getting bombarded with spam from Amazon?

Posted by: bernverdnardo at April 26, 2015 11:58 AM (WhfU/)

111 Survival of the fittest for serfs would select
people who wanted and needed to worship their king. People who hated FDR
are descended from kings.
Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:35 AM (PGh+Q)

Dad says that when FDR died, Grandpa came home from work and said, "Son, the president died today. Don't tell anyone that you are pleased about it because there are a lot of Democrats in the neighborhood."

He hated that man venomously, and there are no kings in our woodpile.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 26, 2015 11:59 AM (t//F+)

112
About 18 deaths in base camp but thousands in the valley. I think of Everest as the place where the rich go to die...

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 11:59 AM (iQIUe)

113 "Anyone else suddenly getting bombarded with spam from Amazon?"


Like the gift card thing? I was getting that for a while.

Posted by: HH at April 26, 2015 12:00 PM (Ce4DF)

114 #65, so was Steven Ambrose, even if no one called him out on it while he was alive. It is something my pal Marty Morgan and I don't talk about- Marty studied under Ambrose and he got Marty the D-Day Museum gig that really launched his career.

Speaking of which, Marty's book "The Americans in Normandy" is amazing. I reviewed it on Amazon. You haven't seen many of the pictures before, and the ones you have are digitally printed and look like new.

Posted by: SGT Dan's Cat at April 26, 2015 12:02 PM (ZDXYb)

115 96 I think the reason most young Ukrainian women are visually stunning is because that is the only kind of person that could get food during all the pillages.
Posted by: Evolution appologist at April 26, 2015 11:40 AM (PGh+Q)


You mean their mothers/grandmothers were all schtupping nazis?

Actually, it was either Anita Pallenberg or Marianne Faithful who came out and said she was the product of rape by a nazi.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:04 PM (iQIUe)

116 WRT Ukrainian hotties, etc., one of the enduring unsolved mysteries of Soviet history was the invisibility of all the good looking women, who later, magically, emerged from out of nowhere post-1991.

Spent a few months in the USSR as a young'in, at the age where girls were priorities one through infinity. Students on a semester program,guys would talk and share intel and it was amazing - we never saw any talent, anywhere.

Still recall the single time we spotted some hotties.Nice, almost-modern teahouse, a place not for foreign tourists, therefore for Party and apparatchik types. Two hot looking young women, college age, decently dressed (not totally western, but better than the Soviet standard). Party brats, to be sure.

Then, first post-Soviet visit to Moscow, early 90s. Wow. WTF? No Brazil, or Israel, or Vietnam - but wow, plenty of talent. Of course they were there before the collapse. So how were they invisible? As I said, enduring mystery.

Posted by: rhomboid at April 26, 2015 12:04 PM (afQnV)

117 "I've heard similar things about Icelandic women. The Vikings only took
the good looking girls with them to help colonize the frontier."

Maybe we can do that when we colonize Mars, etc.

Hey, that's an interesting angle for a science fiction story... Earth girls are ugly. Heh.

Posted by: Apostate at April 26, 2015 12:05 PM (4pWO0)

118 Oh, I take that back! It was Marianne Faithful and it was her mother and gmother who were raped by the red army.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:06 PM (iQIUe)

119 he was our leader from when I was 10 years old"

-
When I was a kid, there was an old guy who lived across the street. He hated FDR. He had a story I didn't really listen to but the gist was when he was in the army, his unit had to stand at attention for hours in the hot sun waiting for FDR to grace them with his presence.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 26, 2015 12:08 PM (LImiJ)

120 About 18 deaths in base camp but thousands in the valley. I think of Everest as the place where the rich go to die...

See where a Google executive died? A privacy director.

Reminds me of the words of the Google CEO; 'If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place.'

Using that logic, maybe the privacy director shouldn't have been climbing Everest in the first place.

Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 26, 2015 12:10 PM (xQX/f)

121 So, f**k them.

Problem was that their entire extended family, including children & babies, were sent to the gulags and eventually killed, too.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:10 PM (iQIUe)

122 I read a bio of Martha Gellhorn, the title which escapes me. She spent her 20s in France with the intellectual set - writers, etc. When she returned after the war, it seems most of the people she hanged out with had been executed for collaboration with the nazis. They went from communism to nazim - extreme to the end.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:14 PM (iQIUe)

123 One thing about the earthquake in Nepal, it had nothing to do with Islam.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 26, 2015 12:14 PM (1flAV)

124 Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 26, 2015 12:10 PM (xQX/f)



Yeah, they are always screwing with me. I want nothing public and make my settings that way and then they change them. They make it really difficult to set them to private, too.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:15 PM (iQIUe)

125 Martha Gellhorn

-
Wasn't she Hemmingway's main squeeze?

Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 26, 2015 12:16 PM (1flAV)

126 Bruce J. - oh, I know. The accounts of how whole extended families were tortured, exiled, or shot is disgusting.

But the treachery, degradation, and murder of the principals? Yawn. Insane, blood-soaked, delusional animals eating their own. The squeamishness of many - soon eliminated - in the Party leadership about the Purge I find especially repugnant. They were fine with mass atrocities, genocide, when it served their insane, evil lust for power and need to play-act their absurd "ideology". But uncomfortable with shooting dissenters within their ranks. Ahhh, too bad.

And many of the spouses and siblings were no better than the big names. So - sympathy meter is not moving, tapped it a few times. Nope. Still and dead as a zampolit shot in his sleep .....

Posted by: rhomboid at April 26, 2015 12:18 PM (afQnV)

127
At first I thought they were buried with snow but the avalanche happened behind base camp. The force did move boulders and other objects which became lethal in base camp.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:18 PM (iQIUe)

128 I have read that easy-access pron keeps a significant fraction of folks satisfied enough so that they leave real people alone.

Posted by: eman at April 26, 2015 12:18 PM (MQEz6)

129 I want nothing public and make my settings that way and then they change them. They make it really difficult to set them to private, too.

I blacklisted YouTube (a Google entity) to not accept cookies, so now it crashes my browser. Every. Time. They really are evil.

Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 26, 2015 12:19 PM (xQX/f)

130 Nood.

Link dump.

Posted by: speedster1 on the ipad at April 26, 2015 12:20 PM (1brdf)

131 Wasn't she Hemmingway's main squeeze?
Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 26, 2015 12:16 PM (1flAV)

-----------------------------
Main? He has so many. They were sleeping together when he was married to Pauline. She met him in Spain. Divorced during the war. They saw each other as competitors.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 26, 2015 12:32 PM (iQIUe)

132 Reading a scifi series by Edward Robertson.

It is a very good continuation of an earlier series, but set 1000 years in the future.

Posted by: eman at April 26, 2015 12:33 PM (MQEz6)

133 110
Anyone else suddenly getting bombarded with spam from Amazon?

I've always gotten lots of spam from Amazon.

The annoying one is Staples. They didn't send me a thing until they closed my local store. Then they started bombarding me with special, amazing, in-store deals that I had to dash right down to the store to get before they expire. Except, of course, that I no longer have a store I can dash to.

Posted by: Anachronda at April 26, 2015 12:37 PM (o78gS)

134 Well, back to writing. Big scene I've been picking at for a week. I'll probably end up having Anna Puma massage it. Later Rons.
Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 26, 2015 11:45 AM (KbNXw)


Writer buddy of mine had a bunch of cartoons clipped and pinned up in his guest bathroom. My favorite was of a guy sitting at a typewriter, saying "Oh, to hell with it! 'Suddenly a lot of shots rang out and everybody fell dead. The End.'"

Posted by: jwpaine at April 26, 2015 12:43 PM (0bXhD)

135 Then, first post-Soviet visit to Moscow, early 90s. Wow. WTF? No Brazil, or Israel, or Vietnam - but wow, plenty of talent. Of course they were there before the collapse. So how were they invisible? As I said, enduring mystery.
Posted by: rhomboid at April 26, 2015 12:04 PM (afQnV)

From a cruise ship I took a tour of Yalta in 1984, and the government tour guide was a VERY cute brunette, dressed in a pink dress that had all the quality of a dollar store purchase.

I don't remember what women on the street looked like, since after awhile my priority was holding it until I got back to the ship. The "bathroom" at the castle where the treaty of Yalta was signed was a filthy hole in the floor.

Posted by: stace at April 26, 2015 12:48 PM (CoX6k)

136 Every thread should end with a bathroom reference.

Posted by: stace at April 26, 2015 12:53 PM (CoX6k)

137 Green Beach James Leasor. About the Dieppe Raid and the British wanting to knick bits of a German Freya radar. We Americans talk about what a disaster Desert One was, Rutter is bloody horrendous. Lord Mountbatten wanted the tanks to land on a beach more suitable and called for a pre-invasion bombardment. Montgomery and the Army had to tinker; the tanks would land closer to Dieppe on the doubtful shingle beach - the Canadian tanks did bog down on that beach - and they also nixed the bombardment because they did not want the rubble to clog the streets - cart before horse you stupid wankers, first need to get ashore. Then the matter of the RAF radar boffin was a whole new level of cock-up. Jack is Jewish and not once did the RAF or Army think to issue him false ID even as they made him wear an Army uniform. And the Canadian regiment, the SSR, he was dumped on was not told exactly what his mission was and then because Jack was so well versed in RDF they were told to shoot him to prevent his capture. That he got back to England alive is a miracle.

On the writing front, having difficulty writing about death. The emotional upheaval due to a murder, having a hard time trying to get a grasp on exactly those feelings.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at April 26, 2015 12:58 PM (0Ef//)

138 The book was actually originally a short story, Iphigenia in Aulis which was expanded into the full novel. The original story ended with the escape from the military base, so your feelings about the book are spot on.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at April 26, 2015 11:45 AM (q20+R)


Thanks for the confirmation, DangerGirl.

Yeah, the writing which had been so crisp and descriptive went from an A to about a B-/C+ depending on the chapter.

And, yep, that was pretty much right after the escape.

The author also sidelined the girl, which I believe was a mistake.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 26, 2015 01:00 PM (0cMkb)

139 Just finished reading John C. Wright's Hugo nominated works - they're good enough for the nominations, certainly. I am waiting for my packet so I can read the rest in the categories before I make a decision.

You can get the ebook free from Castalia House, the eeeevil Vox Day's press. http://www.castaliahouse.com/downloads/the-nominated-short-fiction-works-of-john-c-wright/

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 26, 2015 01:02 PM (Edob3)

140 Oh, OSP use the Popsicle sticks. That should solve your issue.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at April 26, 2015 01:07 PM (0Ef//)

141 I got 63% on the detective quiz-which is apparently 6% higher than the average score-, but I had to guess at a quite a few. The ones I know, I know. The ones I don't, I am not even familiar with the names of the sleuths.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 26, 2015 01:10 PM (DXzRD)

142 *begin shameless plug*

I'm late to the book thread party, but I wanted to put in a shameless plug for a first novel written by an old and dear friend of mine, out this week. I know we have a lot of authors and sci-fi types here, so have at it.

http://tinyurl.com/q42795p

*end shameless plug*

Posted by: RedMindBlueState at April 26, 2015 01:26 PM (kJUI8)

143 #142 Heh. Didn't read the thread, did you?

Posted by: OregunMuse at April 26, 2015 01:34 PM (a9rtH)

144 Dang typo.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 26, 2015 01:35 PM (a9rtH)

145 Did George Soros buy up thousands of copies of Fauzcohantas' book and then get fake people to review it, as he did with Obama's, because it's risible to think that Lizzy wrote her own book or that everybody gave it 5 stars.

Transformational leader. What exactly has she lead?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 26, 2015 01:38 PM (DXzRD)

146 OM ... Thanks, as always, for another fun book thread and especially for the Dickens painting. I could spend hours looking at it full size.

Posted by: JTB at April 26, 2015 01:41 PM (FvdPb)

147 Posted by: Kindltot at April 26, 2015 10:24 AM (t//F+)

LOL. Good one. Mary has no idea what you're talking about or she wouldn't if she wasn't a sock

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 26, 2015 02:13 PM (DXzRD)

148 Reading "The Army of the Potomac: A Stillness at Appomattox" by Bruce Catton. It was mentioned in PowerLine a couple of weeks ago and I found a new-old-stock hardbound in Amazon Marketplace for cheap. Looks to be very interesting book about the last part of the Civil War and how it changed our view of war, the races, politics, and pretty much everything else. Copyright 1953, people just don't write image-inducing prose like this anymore.

For my birthday, my brother gave me "Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty" by Vikram Chandra. Never heard of it before and not sure where it's going, seems to be a series of free association essays on the aesthetics of computer programming. After 40 years of programming, I'm not sure he has anything to tell me that I don't already know, but we'll see.

Posted by: Socratease at April 26, 2015 02:18 PM (2GbWn)

149 I am reading a bio of Johnny Carson by his attorney, Henry Bushkin.
I can't put it down.

Posted by: Thor's feather duster at April 26, 2015 02:40 PM (JgC5a)

150 Scored an exact 50% on the quiz...., so, like a "50% chance of rain" forecast, maybe I am well-read, maybe I ain't.

A friend recently pressed "The Tipping Point" on me. I'm about halfway through. I find it a tedious read, and so far, mostly articulating obvious facts. There are some interesting individual case studies that are detailed.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at April 26, 2015 02:47 PM (F2IAQ)

151 Did George Soros buy up thousands of copies of Fauzcohantas' book
----------------

It's called, 'The Jim Wright Gambit'. Jim Wright (D), natch) former Speaker of the House. All of his books were bought in bulk by union cronies, as I recall. Handy way to launder cash.

Whatever else you think of him, Newt had enough spine to file charges against Wright, and Wright came tumbling down.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at April 26, 2015 02:53 PM (F2IAQ)

152 Heh. Didn't read the thread, did you?

Posted by: OregunMuse at April 26, 2015 01:34 PM


No. Oops. Sorry about the Amazon link, but it was the only one I had.

Posted by: RedMindBlueState at April 26, 2015 03:28 PM (kJUI8)

153 "66
I'm almost through quicksilver (Neal Stephenson) so must decide whether
to continue the series this rainy day or select a faster read. I've
enjoyed this book but I usually read less in late spring and summer.
I've really enjoyed reading about all the early natural philosophers.


Posted by: PaleRider at April 26, 2015 10:51 AM (7w/kf)"

The Baroque Cycle consumed all of my free time/reading time for more than a year. It was great. One of the best things I've ever read. But by the end I was really looking forward to reading something else.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at April 26, 2015 05:06 PM (KDbAT)

154 I second/third/nth the recommendations for The Martian, which I read yesterday. Clearly Hugo-worthy (and would have been on the SP slate had it been eligible). THE SCIENCE IS CORRECT. !!!

I wasn't going to bother voting for the Hugos this year until I heard the SJWs threatening to No Award every category. That's BS. So I will vote.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at April 26, 2015 05:16 PM (1EtXn)

155 Btw, to the person working on Dresden Files, Skin Game is EXCELLENT. It's Butcher's best so far. So good I actually reread it within a couple weeks.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at April 26, 2015 05:16 PM (1EtXn)

156 I don't think the theory about Ukrainian women being hot because they "were able to get food"--in other words sleeping with higher-ups--holds much water. I've seen beautiful women come from the union of two average, or even ugly people. And before you go invoking the proverbial "milkman", I've seen siblings who resemble each other--but one is much better looking than the other. It's a crapshoot and sometimes the line between homely and "hot" is a rather thin one, and much of it comes down to weight--and grooming.
Also--and I don't want to ruffle feathers--I remember when you started to see Third World immigrants arriving here--and outside of a few hotties (mostly from well-to-do families), most of the girls were quite plain--at best. Well these days, some of the prettiest, most smoking-hot young women I see are from these same hell-holes. What happened? Again, weight, grooming (that means non-essential hair removal) and I guess better nutrition?

Posted by: JoeF. at April 26, 2015 05:37 PM (8HGb7)

157 139 Thanks for the link! I didn't know that had been put up already.

Posted by: BornLib at April 27, 2015 05:24 AM (zpNwC)

158 Just finished reading Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar, by Simon Sebag Montefiore. I can't recommend this book highly enough. If you think you have good reason to fear a leftist government now, wait until you finish this book. The evil these people wrought, and the sheer offhandedness with which they did it, is stunning in its magnitude. The Soviets were terrible, terrible people who thought absolutely nothing about betraying their closest friends and sending tens of thousands of innocents to their doom.

One thing is absolutely certain: after reading this book, I haven't the slightest doubt that Bill Ayers and his confreres were as serious as a heart attack about sending 1/4 to 1/3 of the country to concentration camps. His heroes the Soviets wouldn't have thought twice about doing that. He probably saw himself as "Iron Bill," a man who wouldn't hesitate to wade knee-deep in blood to help the Cause.

I know now that it would be better to die fighting these people than to live under them. Those people saying "better dead than red" in the 50's didn't know just how right they actually were. Read Montefiore's book and you will know.

Posted by: mac at April 27, 2015 07:41 AM (XDPWw)

159 Awwww, I missed the book thread.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 27, 2015 07:50 AM (wlDny)

160 Missed two on the detective quiz. Obviously you waste your time reading literature.

Posted by: Bob at April 27, 2015 12:06 PM (fVGlW)

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