Sunday Morning Book Thread 04-05-2015: How Hopeful Is The Dawn [OregonMuse]


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Happy Easter Sunday to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.

Alleluia! He Is Risen!


Book Quote

Beware of the person of one book.

-Thomas Aquinas


Help Arlene's Flowers

You've all heard about this already, but I think it's important enough to mention again, and yes, it does tie in to books, as you will see if you keep reading.

Mrs. Barronelle Stutzman, who owns and operates Arlene's Flowers is being sued by the state of Washington for agreeing with Obama's view on gay marriage that he held in 2008. Alas, the 70-year old grandmother may lose her business because she didn't sufficiently evolve enough to suit the social justice terrorists:

Barronelle Stutzman, a Christian florist, referred her friend and long-time customer to other florists because she could not in good conscience provide full wedding support for a same-sex wedding. Although the couple received flowers, the Washington State Attorney General, and later, the same-sex couple, sued Barronelle.

The court found her liable for violating the Washington Law Against Discrimination and ruled that both the state and the couple may collect damages and attorneys' fees from Barronelle's business and personal assets.

Now THAT'S depressing. How'd you like to be sued by one of your long-time friends? What happened was that after Mrs. Stutzman refused to do his wedding, the customer complained on social media, which resulted in it coming to the attention of the state attorney general, who then took it upon herself to initiate the lawsuit against her. Then the customer and his partner piled on with their own lawsuit, which targeted Mrs. Stutzman personally as well as her business. Because apparently there's nothing more dangerous than a 70-year-old florist who refuses to do a homosexual wedding. She must be bullied into acquiescence, or bankruptcy.

Mrs. Stutzman's GoFundMe account, set up by Alliance Defending Freedom, the legal organization that is helping her mount a defense, is over $80,000 $85,000 $89,000 now, so good job, all. Hopefully she'll make the $100,000 goal.

Oh, and thanks to Tammy al-Thor, I can now tie this in to books, so it's not totally OT. Ready? OK, here goes: The organization that is helping Mr. Stutzman defend herself, the Alliance Defending Freedom, also helped Tyndale House Publishers, one of the largest private publishers of Bibles, Christian books, and other Christian media in the world, when the federal government tried to use the ObamaCare laws to force them to pay for abortion-inducing drugs in their employee medical coverage plan.

But the Obama administration's case turned out to be Not All That:

In May 2013, at the government's own request, a federal appellate court dismissed the Obama administration's appeal of an order that stopped the president from enforcing his abortion pill mandate against the Bible publisher. The administration's retreat marks the first total appellate victory on a preliminary injunction in any abortion pill mandate case.

Of course, Tyndale's claim was very similar to the more well-known Hobby Lobby case.

It's nice to see the good guys win one. Now let's help Mrs. Stutzmann win hers.


Read The Bible

That's my exhortation to everyone this Easter Sunday. Even if you're not a believer, I think it's important for an educated, informed adult, even nowadays, to have at least a passing familiarity with its contents. Why?

1. Because a large part of the blueprint for western civilization can be found here. Not the whole story, of course, the Greeks and Romans also have their say, but if I had to start all over again from zero, and I could only use one guiding source to reconstruct our social institutions, this is the book I'd want to use.

2. Because, English. Not that the Bible was written in English (obviously), but between the 1611 King James edition of the Bible, and Shakespeare, that's pretty much the origins of the modern English language right there:

The Authorized Version has been called "the most influential version of the most influential book in the world, in what is now its most influential language", "the most important book in English religion and culture", and "the most celebrated book in the English-speaking world". It has contributed 257 idioms to English, more than any other single source, including Shakespeare; examples include feet of clay and reap the whirlwind. Although the Authorized Version's former monopoly in the English-speaking world has diminished...it is still the most popular translation in the United States, especially among Evangelicals

And speaking of Shakespeare and the Bible, here's a fun fact: If you count 46 words past the title sentence of Psalm 46, you arrive at the word "shake". If you count 46 words backwards from the end (leaving out the final 'Selah' as not really being part of the psalm), you get "spear". The KJV was first published in 1611 when Shakespeare was 46 years old. This supposedly means that Shakespeare was actually a member of the KJV translation committee, and the Psalm 46 Easter Egg is his way of sneakily advertising his presence.

No, I don't think I believe it, but it's a fun story nonetheless.

Meet The New Boss

As has been observed more than once this past week, the progs have won the culture war and what they're doing now is patrolling the battlefield and shooting whatever survivors are left. Part of that mopping-up operation is, of course, revising the past to conform to the new prejudices that are now being enforced.

So naturally there has to be party-line propaganda like this, a list that someone very provincial and culturally myopic has determined are the 25 most "homoerotic" relationships in literature.

All the usual suspects are here: Ishmael and Queequeg, Frodo and Sam, David and Goliath Jonathan, and practically everyone in Shakespeare. Because we're all gay now. Seriously. Applaud now. Louder. You're not applauding loudly enough, citizen. Off to the Happy Fun Camp with you!

It is apparently beyond the comprehension of some that people in previous times in history did not have "all sex, all the time" as their main operating principle. And so two people of the same gender could actually have a close friendship or sleep in the same bed without (a) having sex, (b) wanting to have sex, (c) thinking about having sex, or (d) sex being in the equation AT ALL.

Now I can grant that maybe this "secretly gay" thing may apply to one or two of the more modern books on the list, but even so, it's infuriating to read this revisionist crap, especially when the guy includes a quote from one of the authors (John Knowles, A Separate Peace) SPECIFICALLY DENYING the allegation that he intended any homosexual subtext:

Knowles has said, "Freud said any strong relationship between two men contains a homoerotic element...If so in this case, both characters are totally unaware of it. It would have changed everything, it wouldn't have been the same story."

So, in other words, the author of the book explicitly says no, there's no gay sex here, not even a little bit, so by any normal standards of judgment, his book shouldn't be on the list, YET IT GETS INCLUDED, ANYWAY! What does it take NOT to be gay? I'll retire to Bedlam.


___________

And speaking of gay guys, the comic book character Archie Andrews was killed, taking a bullet for a gay guy. This is old news (July 2014), and it occurred in an alternate timeline so Archie is not being just dumped, but take a look at these photos from 'Life With Archie', some of the artwork has a "graphic novel" look-and-feel to it, like the adventures of all the gang at Riverdale High are for grown-ups now. I must admit I kind of liked it.


Used Books

Mike Hammer tipped me to this, from ABE Books, a list of their top 100 Bestselling Used Books since 2000. Mike's thoughts on this list are pretty much the same as mine;

I would call it an eclectic mix. I am encouraged by the popularity of some titles, discouraged by others. Also, I am simply surprised to find some titles there at all. It would have been interesting to see the actual number of sales for each title.

So how many of these have you morons read? Mike's count is 28. I could only squeeze out 27, and that includes a couple of "maybes" (my memory ain't so good these days), but I'm sure many of you have read a lot more.


Ace Gave Up His TV, And You Won't Believe What He's Doing Now

On the Friday 'Kill Your TV' thread, he inventoried the books, or at least some of them, on his stack that he needed to get away from his television set to read, and I think it's an interesting list:

1. Going Clear, Lawrence Wright's expose/history of Scientology.

(I'm surprise this book is available. As I recall, the Scientology organization is quite testy and litigious, and they used to sue dissenters into silence. (South Park: "I'll sue you! I'll sue you in England!" ) Maybe they've just given up. )

2. Starting Strength, by Mark Rippetoe, which Instapundit is forever flogging, and S. Crowder just said he recommends to everyone he knows.

(Given the endorsements by Insty and Crowder, I thought this was going to be some kind of economics tract, but it's actually about weight training with barbells. Then again, compared to me, the Pillsbury Doughboy is one ripped dude).

3. Flashman. I am told this is a fantastically fun historical adventure with a dirty, lying, cheating bully of a thief.

(Yes, this Harry Reid biography is, of course, a moron favorite. )

4. The Girl With All the Gifts, by M.R. Carey or something like that. Scary doctor-who-ish horror fantasy.

(I've never heard of this one. The Amazon blurb reads like a 'Twilight Zone' script summary)

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her 'our little genius'. Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh. Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children's cells. She tells her favourite teacher all the things she'll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn't know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

Sounds delightfully creepy.


Moron Recommendations

In a thread of a few days ago, one of you morons recommended Earthly Powers by British historian Michael Burleigh, and I think it's particularly appropriate for this Easter Sunday.

While doing his research on the Third Reich...Burleigh became interested in the religious character of totalitarianism. In "Earthly Powers," he traces the history of European secularization from the French Revolution to the First World War...The totalitarianisms of the 20th century - Fascism, Nazism, and Communism - made use of many of the rituals of established religions. They used festivals, spectacles, monuments, statues, loyalty oaths, and so forth to satisfy the religious impulse in societies in which religion had been banished.

When it comes to government, you can never have no religion. If you try to remove religion from the state, then the almighty State will simply take over and become the religion, by default.

Burleigh has written a follow-up. His first book only takes the historical survery up to World War 1. The sequel, Sacred Causes, brings it up to the present day.


Books By Morons

Some of the morons (and 'ettes) are trying to crowdfund their writing projects, so please consider tossing some coin their way:

Anna Puma's novel, The Seventh Courtesan, part of which appeared in her short story e-book anthology, The Princess Who Caused Fear, on Amazon.

Also, Allen G's as-yet-unnamed fantasy novel.

And don't forget baldilock's novel Arlen's Harem. Here is an excerpt. And another. And a third.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:08 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good morning!

Pretty picture.

Posted by: Y-not at April 05, 2015 09:09 AM (9BRsg)

2 Finished up the re-read on The Last Centurion. The just finished a re-read of Island In the Sea of Time. Instead of going into the next in that series I am going to try something different. I am moving on to Dies The Fire by the same author.


I find that if you read these series all in a row you start losing interest after the first few. So I will go back and forth.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 09:09 AM (wlDny)

3 Well, maybe the culture war isn't as over as some think. The Hugo Noms are out, and the Sad Puppy slate has the SJWs in a screaming frenzy. Puppies are gladdened.

Posted by: Shawn at April 05, 2015 09:10 AM (eK3xL)

4 This week I read Water Touching Stone, the second in the Inspector Shan series by Eliot Pattison. While I enjoy the who-done-it stories, the great thing about the series is how much one learns about Tibet, Buddhism, the minority nationalities of the region, and what the Chinese are doing to eradicate their culture and way of life.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 05, 2015 09:12 AM (eLZwy)

5 Something I don't understand about that WA case of persecution is the federal freedom of religion law. Why doesn't that supersede the WA law because of the "supremacy" clause that the liberals always beat the crap out of conservatives with?

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 09:14 AM (wlDny)

6 Happy Easter y'all. Got up at 4a (by accident) and watched the Easter mass from the Basilica. Do you think that gets me out of going to Mass this morning?

Posted by: olddog in mo at April 05, 2015 09:16 AM (3eZI/)

7 g'mornin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at April 05, 2015 09:22 AM (irT2h)

8 Morning all.

Happy Easter

This thread to way to cerebral for me.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 09:23 AM (/tNwW)

9 Good morning. Just finished the Big Bang by Roy Griffis. A little post apocalyptic reading. Really good stuff written by a fine conservative ex military man.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 09:24 AM (KbNXw)

10 Oh, happy Easter!!

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 09:25 AM (KbNXw)

11 I read 37 books from Abo 100 list and would like to read may be 5 more.

Currently I am reading Michael Dobbs (the author "House of cards") "Winston's war: A novel of conspiracy".

This is historical thriller, England in 1938-1939, Chamberlain against Churchill.
In light of current Obama's Iran deal this book is very interesting read. Obama's and Chamberlain speeches and thoughts are so similar. Unfortunately, we don't have Churchill right now to fight Obama's stupidity

Posted by: redmonkey at April 05, 2015 09:27 AM (mSvfz)

12 Scientologists make their money from new recruits and rich ones. I dont see how anyone can be a member unless they are independently wealthy. Some of the not so wealthy ones are offered free courses for slave labor. If they are given free room and board, it is 6 to a room, dawn to midnight work, and really crappy food. If they leave, they are told that they owe the cult for the crappy food and bed.

But, CoS is loosing members. Not sure how they are going to make a comeback. Twist the arms of the rich members? Even some of the wealthy actors were balking at the constant solicitations for cash.

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 05, 2015 09:27 AM (iQIUe)

13 I can't even begin to praise the Flashman series highly enough. Anyone who is a fan of historical fiction should pick them up, George MacDonald Fraser was a British infantryman in Burma and a newspaper writer after that and he brings a soldier's eye to his books. He has a great way with finding a fascinating, but little known, character and bringing him (or her) into his story. Sir Harry is a coward and a cad who keeps finding himself in the middle of every massacre and disaster of the 19th century where, despite his cowardice, he comes out looking like a great hero. The books are fascinating and hilarious and I learned a great deal from them, despite the fact that I consider myself pretty well informed regarding history.

Posted by: 68W58 at April 05, 2015 09:28 AM (rYFmu)

14 Twenty-six on the best-selling used books, some of them read for school, back in the day. I don't know if I should even count The Davinci Code, because I could only get about two chapters in. I kept tripping and falling flat over sentences that read like entries in the Bulwer-Lytton Bad Writing Contest.

This week I have a book event at the Half-Price Books on Broadway in San Antonio - it's part of a state-wide event organized by the Texas Association of Authors - DEAR Texas ... stands for Drop Everything and Read. The association has lined up authors to do appearances and readings at bookstores in just about every good-sized city. I don't think I'll sell a good many of my own books, and at worst, I'll be sitting in the corner with another author and both of us twiddling our thumbs ... but the TAA is putting a great deal of effort into publicity about it, so, who knows?

Happy Easter, y'all!

Posted by: Sgt Mom at April 05, 2015 09:29 AM (95iDF)

15 If one reads the KJV, one will learn that the handwriting on the wall came about by a hand writing on the wall.

Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:31 AM (Ua6T/)

16 but if I had to start all over again from zero, and I could only use one guiding source to reconstruct our social institutions

Society can not be constructed (this is the ultimate folly of the Left). It evolves. What we have now (or had) is atypical in human history due to a rare confluence of events that combined both liberty and virtue.

Once that is gone, it is gone.

Posted by: The Political Hat at April 05, 2015 09:32 AM (0Ew3K)

17 22, but I feel non-literary on account of how many of those are Harry Potter books.

But for all their flaws -- and they are legion -- the HP books will always have a special place in my heart. I read them aloud to my boys when they were little. I had a different voice for each character. We had to wait until the next year for the next book to come out.

They are the only generation of children who will remember waiting for the next Harry Potter book.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:33 AM (1xUj/)

18 Well, maybe the culture war isn't as over as some think. The Hugo Noms
are out, and the Sad Puppy slate has the SJWs in a screaming frenzy.
Puppies are gladdened.


And the Monster Hunter guy actually declined his nomination.

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 09:34 AM (oVJmc)

19 On the 100 best selling books, I didn't read, but sat through class while The Great Gatsby was taught. I may have read some.

Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:34 AM (Ua6T/)

20 This morning, I'm reading BOB.

BOB is the Big Orange Book. Entitled "Fundamentals of Astrophysics."

Now this thing is the best compilation of physics ever written. Kinematics, thermo, E and M, it has it all.

Now before you fall asleep (I understand) I'm reading this cover to cover again. It's like the bible to us geeks.

Tucked into the text of the first 50 pages or so is a bit on measuring luminocity. At the end of the discussion, some editor or writer called the method

Un physical

Now, in normal company you say unphysical no one even notices.

In the nerdery of physics this is the part where Eric Cartman says "How would you like to suck my balls. Mister Garrison" and the whole class goes wide eyed and sucks in their breath.

It's like the tactical nuke of physics: telling a physicist that what they just did is unphysical.

I laughed because in 14 years of re-re-reading the book I'd missed that.

Posted by: TangoNine at April 05, 2015 09:35 AM (x3YFz)

21 I recently finished reading a book called "Kingdom of the Hittites". It is a non-fiction history book.

The Hittites fell suddenly and almost completely, with but a few peripheral kingdoms surviving for but a bit longer.

They were a "multi-cultural" society with conflicting gods and values, perpetual internal dissention, and beset on all sides by enimies. In the end, they were taken out by an influx of illegal aliens (i.e. the "Sea People").

We'd be lucky if we went the way of the Romans.

I fear that we may soon have our own Suppiluliuma II...

Posted by: The Political Hat at April 05, 2015 09:35 AM (0Ew3K)

22 They are the only generation of children who will remember waiting for the next Harry Potter book.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:33 AM (1xUj/)


My eleven year old had read each one 3 or 4 times. I guess they are truly magical.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 09:35 AM (KbNXw)

23 Read an interesting novel centered around the trial of Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle in 1921. Publisher William Randolph Hearst's newspapers condemn Arbuckle and seek a guilty verdict. Arbuckle's lawyer hires the Pinkerton Detective Agency, including agent Dashiell Hammett to investigate.

The novel is "Devil's Garden" by Ace Atkins. While fiction, it is based on historical events.

If the names seem familiar but you are a younger person, Arbuckle was a famous silent movie star, Hearst was an immensely wealthy publisher and businessman, and Hammett wrote a number of famous books including "The Thin Man" and "The Maltese Falcon."

Hearst was the inspiration for Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" and did his best to see that Welles never worked again. Arbuckle didn't work in movies for 13 years after his acquittal in the third trial.

Yeah, I know that Hammett was a Communist. I think that was attributable to his work as as a strike breaker in the Pinkertons in the late teams.

Still, he was a very influential writer, served in two world wars, and is burried in Arlington Nation Cemetery.

Great period detail in "Devil's Garden." Recommended.

Posted by: doug at April 05, 2015 09:35 AM (9teY/)

24 Christ is Risen!

For those that are inclined, I offer this youtube of what I feel is a good Easter gospel song. Every time I hear this, I wish I could have heard this live with a crowd of believers!

http://bit.ly/1FuXt59

Enjoy the day that God hath made and blessed us with!

Hrothgar

Posted by: Hrothgar at April 05, 2015 09:37 AM (ftVQq)

25 And the Monster Hunter guy actually declined his nomination.
Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 09:34 AM (oVJmc)

I'm in a group of Authors with larry. No Nominated Book is actually winning in some categories.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 09:37 AM (KbNXw)

26 Found a copy of Charlie Chaplin's autobiography for a buck at a thrift store. Will I actually read it? I dunno, stranger things have happened.

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 09:37 AM (oVJmc)

27 @23 make that "a strike breaker in the Pinkertons in the late teens."

Sorry, insufficient caffeine...

Posted by: doug at April 05, 2015 09:38 AM (9teY/)

28 I don't see a credit for the photo, but that is a beauty and perfect for the day. It is so good to know that He is alive.

Posted by: goon at April 05, 2015 09:38 AM (A53Jp)

29 I've been thumbing through the Bible. It's a slow process because every five words I start thinking about history, word derivations, linguistics, and a dozen other areas. Although I know the same accounts as most people, much of the specifics (and depth) is new to me. Brought up Catholic when and where I was, every family had a Bible but we were never encouraged to actually read it. Too Bad. I missed a lot.

I came across something new. It's "The JRR Tolkien Audio Collection". This is a 4 CD set of Tolkien reading excerpts from The Hobbit and LOTR. He made tapes in the early 1950s which, to my surprise, survived. The sound quality isn't the best although still understandable. But the delight is his reading. I expected a rather flat, lecture-like delivery. What I got was the author having fun with his own work, almost as if reading to his family. An example is when he is reading Gollum's lines. His voice is very close to what Sirkis used in the movies. Just a lot of fun.

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 09:39 AM (FvdPb)

30 his book shouldn't be on the list, YET IT GETS INCLUDED, ANYWAY! What does it take NOT to be gay? I'll retire to Bedlam.



Years ago Bob Hope commented on the fact that California had de-crimminalized homosexual acts: I'm moving out before they make it mandatory.

Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 09:39 AM (px8hG)

31 I'm reading "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur ' s Court". I forgot how hilarious Twain was. He threw a line in there about the Buchanan administration I thought I was going to die laughing.

Posted by: small town girl, crusader at April 05, 2015 09:39 AM (YxTUV)

32 19 On the 100 best selling books, I didn't read, but sat through class while The Great Gatsby was taught. I may have read some.
Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:34 AM (Ua6T/)



I never thought Fitzgerald was all that.

While my opinion is worth exactly Jack and squat, the best American writer outside of Twain is Steinbeck, and the best American novel outside of Huck Finn is Lonesome Dove.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at April 05, 2015 09:41 AM (yxw0r)

33 3
Well, maybe the culture war isn't as over as some think. The Hugo Noms
are out, and the Sad Puppy slate has the SJWs in a screaming frenzy.
Puppies are gladdened.
=====
http://tinyurl.com/nux9pg7

Heh.

Posted by: RoyalOil at April 05, 2015 09:43 AM (ZvKdv)

34 >>> It's like the tactical nuke of physics: telling a physicist that what they just did is unphysical.

Just trying to catch up here. Was that because the author took 50 pages of prose to describe a one or two line formula?

Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:44 AM (Ua6T/)

35 That Abe Books list seems to contain a lot of books from what looks like a typical high school syllabus.

And are ladder climbers still buying "Who Moved My Cheese?"? Far better to download "Who Moved My Soap?: A CEO's guide to Surviving Prison".

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 09:44 AM (KH1sk)

36 My eleven year old had read each one 3 or 4 times. I guess they are truly magical.

That's part of what I was getting at. Your eleven year old has discovered the joy of reading.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:44 AM (1xUj/)

37 I'm rereading the " II(2) I Am" series by Christopher Buecheler. It's a pretty well written vampire urban fantasy for adults, definitely for adults. It's a good book to take your mind off things. Three books all together, I believe the first one, "The Blood That Bonds," is free at Amazon.

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 05, 2015 09:45 AM (xVgrA)

38 Time to get ready for church. Those of you that enjoyed my first book, Amy Lynn by Jack July, the sequel is finished, I'm waiting on the final proof. Amy Lynn: Golden Angel should be available late this week early next. The first one was hugely successful for a self published book. Now I get to find out if I'm a fraud.

HE HAS RISEN INDEED, ALLELUIA!!

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 09:45 AM (KbNXw)

39 My fav part of the Bible is when The Word of God talks about UNICORNS !! apparently they were considered quite common way back then
Or not

Posted by: righter at April 05, 2015 09:47 AM (6J38E)

40 Posted by: small town girl, crusader at April 05, 2015 09:39 AM (YxTUV)

I read a lot of Twain when I was younger, and I think every American ought to read his works at some point. The man had a talent for humor and for skewering the sacred cows of his day (many of which persist to the modern day) that we could all learn a lot from.

For instance, a lot of people don't realize that Alinsky's rule of mockery and derision was practically plagiarized from Twain. In the story The Mysterious Stranger, Lucifer says something to the effect of "Laughter is humanity's greatest weapon. A colossal humbug can only be pushed back or forth a little, but laughter can blow it to rags and atoms at a blast."

I've been saying for a while that this just means it's an American idea, and we need to spend more time (as Reagan did) skewering the left and serving up large, heaping helpings of their sacred cows.

Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 09:47 AM (3HxZe)

41 >>> the best American novel outside of Huck Finn is Lonesome Dove.

McMurtry did spin quite a yarn.

I've got a couple collections of his essays. Bought them because they were cheap, finished them because he is a great writer.

"Richard Benjamin at the Dairy Queen"

Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:48 AM (Ua6T/)

42 I wholeheartedly agree with "Flashman" being a must-read. But start from the beginning!

But....I must disagree with the KJV, at least for the Old Testament.

I would start with Robert Alter's translation of the Five Books of Moses, and then move to one of the translations that seems similar...there are too many to mention.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 09:49 AM (Zu3d9)

43 Is Sad Puppy a book? I don't get what the fuss is about. A brief explaination someone?

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 05, 2015 09:50 AM (xVgrA)

44 >>> My fav part of the Bible is when The Word of God talks about UNICORNS !!

I think we need some help from Boulder Toilet Hobo on this one.

Posted by: fluffy at April 05, 2015 09:50 AM (Ua6T/)

45 I'm reading "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur ' s Court".

That book is a riot. I've been on a rediscovery binge of Twain the last few years. I don't know why he's taught in high school. Young people (including me at the time) can't possibly get him.

I thought, and I'm curious if you agree, that Twain breaks the fourth wall in "Connecticut Yankee". He seems to say, "by the way, this is how you should organize society, this is what's wrong with government, this is why aristocracy is a fucked system".

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:50 AM (1xUj/)

46

And are ladder climbers still buying "Who Moved My Cheese?"?
Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 09:44 AM (KH1sk)

I hate that book. When your HR department starts handing it out to ease their shriveled, black consciences, polish up the resume.

That said, "The One Minute Manager" is pure gold, easily read in a couple of hours, and, were it actually read by the brown-nosing executive political poop-heaps in contemporary American corporate culture, priceless.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at April 05, 2015 09:51 AM (yxw0r)

47 9 on the used book list

kinda wish it were less. so many seem such a waste of time

Posted by: Malachi at April 05, 2015 09:51 AM (Cq0oW)

48 Happy Easter! He Is Risen! i'll take the black jelly beans if you don't want them.........

Posted by: phoenixgirl at April 05, 2015 09:51 AM (u8GsB)

49 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 09:49 AM (Zu3d9)

I've always loved the KJV for its language. It was an amazing scholarly work for the time, and while the language may be archaic, it's meaty and extremely true to the source material. It doesn't talk down to you, it doesn't spoonfeed, it paints vivid images with difficult words that most of the modern translations I've seen simply can't match.

Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 09:52 AM (3HxZe)

50 They are the only generation of children who will remember waiting for the next Harry Potter book.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:33 AM (1xUj/)

_______________________

Erm, you know, there are other talented English authors out there who write for children. One of them from the 19th century, oh what's his name...?

Posted by: Outgrabing Mome Rath at April 05, 2015 09:53 AM (3F6F8)

51 Far better to download "Who Moved My Soap?: A CEO's guide to Surviving Prison".

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 09:44 AM (KH1sk)


I think the correct title is actually "Who Moved My Soap?: A Conservative CEO's guide to Surviving Prison"

Posted by: Hrothgar at April 05, 2015 09:55 AM (ftVQq)

52 43 Is Sad Puppy a book? I don't get what the fuss is about. A brief explaination someone?
Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 05, 2015 09:50 AM (xVgrA)

It's a movement. The Hugo awards, the most prestigious awards in science fiction, got hijacked by Leftist twits that have begun using the award (a readers choice style award) to promote leftist claptrap that nobody in their right mind would pay to read. It started with someone saying something to the effect of "when those people win, it makes puppies cry" or something to that effect and took on a life of its own. Author Larry Correia, an unabashedly pro-gun, pro-liberty sort created the campaign to try to take back the award, encouraging readers to sign up for Worldcon and vote on things they actually want to read, to take back the award. Naturally, the Lefties have had their panties in a wad about it and called Correia a hatemonger. He responded by adopting the title International Lord of Hate. Much silliness abounds, but their aim is a good one.

Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 09:55 AM (3HxZe)

53 My count is at 8. But it's the right 8. lol

Posted by: Count de Monet at April 05, 2015 09:56 AM (JO9+V)

54 30 his book shouldn't be on the list, YET IT GETS INCLUDED, ANYWAY! What does it take NOT to be gay? I'll retire to Bedlam.



Years ago Bob Hope commented on the fact that California had de-crimminalized homosexual acts: I'm moving out before they make it mandatory.
Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 09:39 AM (px8hG)

Rather prophetic on his part.

Posted by: Insomniac at April 05, 2015 09:57 AM (mx5oN)

55 Cato what really strikes me is how "American" his mindset is regardless of the skewering. It is an idea that is vanishing so quickly in this country I'm afraid our children and grandchildren will never comprehend it.

Posted by: small town girl, crusader at April 05, 2015 09:58 AM (YxTUV)

56 @43 >>>Is Sad Puppy a book? I don't get what the fuss is about. A brief explaination someone?

Go to Breitbart, there is big article about all Hugo nomination and why it so importent

http://tinyurl.com/nux9pg7


Posted by: redmonkey at April 05, 2015 09:58 AM (mSvfz)

57 Something I don't understand about that WA case of persecution is the federal freedom of religion law. Why doesn't that supersede the WA law because of the "supremacy" clause that the liberals always beat the crap out of conservatives with?

Subsequent decisions (or maybe it was the original one) involving the federal RFRA explictly state that it can only apply at the federal level.

In other words, if the states want the benefit of a RFRA, they'll each have to pass their own.

My opinion is that yes, this is how the constitution and federalism is supposed to work. But why only in this one instance? Why doesn't that amendment the fedgov uses to force states to do stuff (14th? 18th? I forget which one) apply here? I don't get it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 09:59 AM (Ku8O8)

58 i will say i hear great things about things fall apart but never read it

Posted by: Malachi at April 05, 2015 09:59 AM (Cq0oW)

59 55 Cato what really strikes me is how "American" his mindset is regardless of the skewering. It is an idea that is vanishing so quickly in this country I'm afraid our children and grandchildren will never comprehend it.
Posted by: small town girl, crusader at April 05, 2015 09:58 AM (YxTUV)

It's something we definitely need to recapture.

Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 10:00 AM (3HxZe)

60 Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 09:52 AM (3HxZe)

It is a beautiful work....and if that were the only choice I would be content.

Also, I know almost nothing of the New Testament (a couple of casual readings)....my experience is with the Old Testament, and in particular the first five books.

What I prefer is the more earthy language of Alter and some of the others who tried very hard to stick to the Aramaic.

I compare it to the first translation of the Iliad and Odyssey that I read; Lattimore did a beautiful job. But the newer and more accurate version by Robert Fagles was a revelation. And, by the way, much more bloody, so I think it should be used in high schools to teach Homer, assuming they still do.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:01 AM (Zu3d9)

61 Hapy Easter!

http://politicalhat.com/?p=8819

Posted by: The Political Hat at April 05, 2015 10:01 AM (0Ew3K)

62 Posted by: Cato the Rebel Without a Party at April 05, 2015 09:52 AM (3HxZe)

I've always been amazed to the dedication and competence of the group of scholars that organized, translated, and completed the task of preparing the KJV. No computers, no collaboration software, no smart phones, but plenty of old books in different languages, lots of paper, and barrels of ink.

And I agree, the language of the KJV has a majesty and cadence that I have never felt in any other version.

Posted by: Hrothgar at April 05, 2015 10:01 AM (ftVQq)

63 I've been thumbing through the Bible. It's a slow process because every
five words I start thinking about history, word derivations,
linguistics,




Somewhere I read that the KJV was written to be heard. That is, most people would hear it rather than read it for themselves because it was 1611 and books were expensive and literacy was a huge factor. Thus, the committee paid attention to the sound of words and phrases and produced a version that sounds wonderful.

Go read a few lines aloud. It's true. The language is beautiful.

Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 10:03 AM (px8hG)

64 I said a hip hop,
The hippie to the hippie
The hip hip a hop, and you don't stop, a rock it
To the bang bang boogie, say up jump the boogie

Posted by: Easter Bunny at April 05, 2015 10:04 AM (Cq0oW)

65 57 Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 09:59 AM (Ku8O


The answer is when you have a liberal court the federal law tops all, when a ruling does not help liberals then it only applies to a narrow set.


IOW, under the liberal's universe head I win, tails you lose.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 10:04 AM (wlDny)

66 I got 36 on the used books list but a lot of them, such as Great Gatsby and To Kill A Mockingbird, were high school assignments. This was the kind of thing that made me realize that a lot of 'classics' are overhyped, academic crap.

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 10:05 AM (FvdPb)

67 Ok, thanks for the knowledge. I've always been more of an epic fantasy/ fantasy reader myself. Never could really get into sci-fi. But yea, fock the SJWs!!!

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 05, 2015 10:05 AM (xVgrA)

68 44 >>> My fav part of the Bible is when The Word of God talks about UNICORNS !!

I think we need some help from Boulder Toilet Hobo on this one.

I'm not bth, but the KJV translators didn't know how to translate a certain obscure Hebrew word, so "unicorn" was their best guess.

The word actually means "wild ox".

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 10:06 AM (Ku8O8)

69 Yes Bandersnach Twain does that but he also skewers the idea of organizing society at all making fun (sleight of hand) of his 1st person protagonist. Under it all he is addicted to the American idea as someone said in an earlier thread that society evolves...for better or worse.

Posted by: small town girl, crusader at April 05, 2015 10:06 AM (YxTUV)

70 Someone flush I mean, call?

The "unicorns" were a mistranslation of a word generally used to denote aurochs, last I read. Those were wild cattle / oxen, extinct now.
http://www.unboundscriptures.com/deut-3317-is-the-kjvs-rendering-unicorns-correct/

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 10:07 AM (AVEe1)

71 Bernard Cornwell's historical fiction series.

ALL of them.

He runs the gamut of a series about Saxon England to 18th century India's subjugation by the British to some stories about the US Revolutionary war.

and an Arthur series.

Well written, good fight scenes and some insight (I think) into how life was lived for those times.

No liberal douchebag philosphy disguised as ancient wisdom or shit like that either.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (zRby/)

72 Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 05, 2015 09:50 AM (1xUj/)

"Bridgeport?" Said I.
"Camelot," Said he.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (Zu3d9)

73 actually, since the federal law was initially conceived as a means to protect the religious activities of peyote using native Americans, they needed a law which functioned on federal lands and not states.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (Cq0oW)

74 I have read 42 of the 100. Presently reading several books simultaneously, including a biography of Emperor Hirohito and the latest Virgil Flowers thriller. I'm starting my own publishing brand and have six of my own books ready to self-publish, including three that will be reissued and three new ones (two novels and a book on the art of writing fiction).

I recently started to read Game of Thrones and got about 50 pages into it before deciding I had better things to do with my time. Also recently picked up A Patriot's History of the United States" and gave it up because it seemed too simplistic and left me wondering why the authors didn't put in a bunch of interesting stuff that I knew about. Seemed to have been written for about a fifth grade level, which perhaps it was.


Posted by: Ruthless at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (ro5Th)

75 20. BOB, Author Roger Bate? Sounds like something my engineer sons might appreciate.

Posted by: Edmund Burke's Shade, languishing in Krazyfornia at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (cmBvC)

76 Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at April 05, 2015 10:08 AM (zRby/)

Have you read, "Agincourt?"

Holy shit...that was a great book.


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:09 AM (Zu3d9)

77 I bought Girl with all the Gifts based on an Amazon recommendation and was underwhelmed. The first part is interesting enough but the payoff is meh.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at April 05, 2015 10:09 AM (/fF2N)

78 Go read a few lines aloud. It's true. The language is beautiful.
Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 10:03 AM (px8hG)

It becomes quite noticeable when you read identical passages in so called colloquial translations.

They just don't sound the same.

Of course that was what I was raised on so that has an influence but I've also been an avid reader with a large vocabulary and reading anything in older english sounds so much better than what we speak and hear and write today.

*sigh* I was born at least a hundred years too late.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at April 05, 2015 10:12 AM (zRby/)

79 Girl with All the Gifts was good, with a good twist on the zombie genre. His Felix Castor series was even better, the story of an occult investigator. I really enjoyed it. Carey is a staunch leftist (I'm "friends" with him on Facebook), but it doesn't come through much in his books that I could see.

Posted by: kalel666 at April 05, 2015 10:12 AM (I9W/6)

80 Happy Easter to you all!

Posted by: Cate at April 05, 2015 10:12 AM (FN+YQ)

81 The word actually means "wild ox".

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 10:06 AM (Ku8O


Aurochs?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:13 AM (Zu3d9)

82 i prefer the Geneva Bible

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at April 05, 2015 10:13 AM (Cq0oW)

83 Kind of surprised you didn't have any comment on the Hugo Nominations from yesterday, OM. It has caused much angst since the announcements.

Posted by: kalel666 at April 05, 2015 10:15 AM (I9W/6)

84 Aurochs?

Yes.

Of course, that word is probably unfamiliar to most people nowadays, so the modern translations use "wild ox", instead. That works.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 10:17 AM (Ku8O8)

85 So, is ace dating a scientologist chick? Is that's what's up?

Posted by: Bruce J. at April 05, 2015 10:18 AM (iQIUe)

86 Sad Puppies is the literary award equivalent of the Pizza Moneybomb.

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 10:18 AM (oVJmc)

87 100 best selling used books is an interesting list. I'm certain I've read and finished 14 of them. Then there are those I started and didn't finish, plus those I took home and meant to read, and a few that were assigned to me in school but didn't even start.

"Guns, Germs and Steel" by Jared Diamond is a favorite of mine. For some reason, some of us on the right don't like this book - I mean, really don't like it - which I never understood. So that's my recommendation; if you like history, I expect you to enjoy it.

Happy Easter, all! Christ is risen!

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 10:19 AM (lHZsI)

88 The New Geneva Study Bible is a great resource. As for translations, I think the New King James version does a good job of straddling ease of reading and adult, accurate text.

The Flashman books are HI-LARIOUS and incredibly informative if you pay attention. Basically its a series about a total cad and coward (who is secretly quite brave - unknown to himself) that through luck, cunning, and charm is able to bumble his way through every major historical event in the 19th century and gain great wealth and accolades in the process.

Very well worth reading and consistently entertaining. The man lives the Ace of Spades lifestyle through meeting and surviving people like Bismark, Queen Victoria, the Charge of the Light Brigade, Custer, John Brown, and much much more.

Its like a smarter, better written Forrest Gump that's not so boomer-centric and is a much more interesting personality.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:19 AM (39g3+)

89 Kind of surprised you didn't have any comment on the Hugo Nominations from yesterday, OM. It has caused much angst since the announcements.

Yeah, I know. I was too busy following the Indiana and Washington State stories to check in on the Hugos.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 10:19 AM (Ku8O8)

90 I'm currently reading Ian Fleming's Commandos by Nicholas Rankin. A great background, behind the scenes view of WW2 from the perspective of British intelligence. A good companion piece to A Man Called Intrepid which reveals many things about events and people you might think you're familiar with.

Its odd, I don't care for fantasy stories very much, but write fantasy. I mostly read historical fiction, mysteries, and sea novels.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:22 AM (39g3+)

91 >>Go read a few lines aloud. It's true. The language is beautiful.

Ooh, will have to try that! We did the "Read the Bible in 90 Days" program at church...which seemed like a really cool way to understand the overarching themes/message of the Bible. Sadly, I didn't keep up. Need to try again...
* * * *

Also, YAY for the success of the Sad Puppies campaigns sweeping the Hugo nominations. Put this in the "Another successful push back against SJW's" list.

Posted by: Lizzy at April 05, 2015 10:22 AM (cXQJ2)

92 We need to start a list of famous duos who are - get this - secretly heterosexual...

Posted by: OG Celtic-American at April 05, 2015 10:24 AM (j1tga)

93 >>Sad Puppies is the literary award equivalent of the Pizza Moneybomb.

And it likely will take money *from* Thor books since they no doubt have been able to push their books harder thanks to them being the primary recipients of said awards.

Posted by: Lizzy at April 05, 2015 10:24 AM (cXQJ2)

94 I thought, and I'm curious if you agree, that Twain breaks the fourth wall in "Connecticut Yankee". He seems to say, "by the way, this is how you should organize society, this is what's wrong with government, this is why aristocracy is a fucked system".

He also thinks American capitalists were horrible and attacked them constantly as well through the book. It annoyed me.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:25 AM (39g3+)

95 Taking the day to catch up on back copies of a new running mag from the UK called Like the Wind. Evening reading is The Book Thief.

Read 40 on the top 100 list if I count The Book Thief.

And sent a donation to Barronelle's GoFundMe. I dislike bullies and sore winners.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at April 05, 2015 10:27 AM (/A5gb)

96 Here's one for all y'all cowboys.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85RLNxd_rKI&list=PLYDj_9-W1t3c7SByDs4y4hs0IBEgXX4yn

Posted by: MachiasPrivateer at April 05, 2015 10:27 AM (EMi53)

97 Obama Manages To Bring Racism Into His Official Statement Marking Passover

The bridge he talks about Civil Rights leaders marching across into the Promised Land in his Passover statement just happens to be the one featured in the White House Twitter feed

Weasel Zippers

Since it is Easter and Passover I will not be my usual vile self and call Fredo a worthless shit eating cock cucking fuuckin asshole.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:27 AM (/tNwW)

98 After Ace's getting away from TV thread I started thinking about all the books I haven't read because I wasted time with televised drivel. That led to what books would I want on paper (for more reliable preservation) as opposed to the ephemeral, out of my direct control e-books. The list, which is just started, is way too long to give here but it is an interesting exercise.

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 10:28 AM (FvdPb)

99 I've been considering the New Oxford Annotated 2010 version, any thoughts on that?

Posted by: OG Celtic-American at April 05, 2015 10:29 AM (j1tga)

100 You Upset the Grace of Living When You Lie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlhdN9iGiyQ&index=4&list=PLYDj_9-W1t3c7SByDs4y4hs0IBEgXX4yn

Posted by: MachiasPrivateer at April 05, 2015 10:29 AM (EMi53)

101 Happy Easter, everyone!

I should be at church today, but I'm not. It's not that I don't believe (with some things I've experienced in my life, I can't NOT believe), but I find it very difficult to find a place where I fit. I always feel like an outsider.

The Sad Puppies story gave me some hope. Maybe we're seeing the beginnings of a turnaround, maybe not. It's still good news. And it's nice to read about on a day about the greatest news of all.

I don't comment on the book thread much, but I love to read it. There are a lot of great suggestions here.

Posted by: Captain Whitebread, Native Kentuckian at April 05, 2015 10:30 AM (rJUlF)

102
re: The Hugos

A backgrounder by a guy in a dress:

io9.com/the-hugo-awards-were-always-political-now-theyre-only-1695721604

And a cri by the man who destroyed the SFWA, with much boo hooing in the comments:

whatever.scalzi.com/2015/04/04/a-note-about-the-hugo-nominations-this-year/

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 10:30 AM (kdS6q)

103 I don't see a credit for the photo, but that is a beauty and perfect for the day.

It reminds me of the cinematography of an award winning but seldom mentioned movie I watched last night, 'Forever's End' (2013). In the credits it mentioned Ohio, and is set in the gently rolling hills and farmland in spring. I'm not certain if it was based on a book. I'm a sucker for the post-apocalyptic genre and it surprised but did not disappoint. Free HD download with Amazon Prime.

Re-reading 'Stories in His Own Hand' because my love for RR never dies.

Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 05, 2015 10:30 AM (xQX/f)

104 I feel baddest for Ashley Judd. That had to be like rape for her last night.

Posted by: ghost of hallelujah at April 05, 2015 10:31 AM (7RXcs)

105 A Simple Song of Freedom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9GUCgWOKXI&index=6&list=PLYDj_9-W1t3c7SByDs4y4hs0IBEgXX4yn

Posted by: MachiasPrivateer at April 05, 2015 10:32 AM (EMi53)

106
HAHA Sad Puppies rules!

Notice you have NEVER seen Scalzi and Wu in the same picture? It's because they are the SAME DUDE!

Posted by: OG Celtic-American at April 05, 2015 10:32 AM (j1tga)

107 I appreciate the Sad Puppy initiative since I used to like reading sci-fi in school and had been wondering where all the tellers of good stories had gone. Now I know they were being frozen out. The book thread has helped me find some good modern writers which were refreshing after the generally negative view the "popular" writers had.

One observation, Sad Puppies is a case of social media working *for* us. We don't have to let the Statists have it all their own way even though they certainly do have more experience at gathering a crowd.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 10:32 AM (GDulk)

108 "He [Mark Twain] also thinks American capitalists were horrible and attacked them constantly as well through the book. It annoyed me."

Worse than John Steinbeck in The Grapes of Wrath?

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 10:33 AM (lHZsI)

109 Funny that a lot of those top 100 used books are the kind one has to read as part of work , such a The Four Agreements, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, How to Win Friends and Influence People as part of some HR training.

Posted by: Lizzy at April 05, 2015 10:33 AM (cXQJ2)

110 102

Lot's of boo-hooing in both. Ironic Typical that the author of the io9 post only seems to complain about politics invading the Hugos when it's politics he disagrees with. If he'd read Correia's blog, he'd know it has nothing to do with one political point of view.

Posted by: Captain Whitebread, Native Kentuckian at April 05, 2015 10:34 AM (rJUlF)

111 >>>>>>I should be at church today, but I'm not. It's not that I don't believe (with some things I've experienced in my life, I can't NOT believe), but I find it very difficult to find a place where I fit. I always feel like an outsider


i think the jews have a good angle on that. as much or more of religious life is at home with family and friends, celebrating life and living with God.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at April 05, 2015 10:34 AM (Cq0oW)

112 By the way we all know G-D is still with us in this World. Because one and done Kentucky LOST last night. Praise the Lord!

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:35 AM (/tNwW)

113 We need to start a list of famous duos who are - get this - secretly heterosexual...

Smirking jokes aside,

Batman and Robin,
Bert Ernie...

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 10:36 AM (oVJmc)

114 I also re-read "Mere Christianity" and started the "God In The Dock" collection of short essays. My respect for CS Lewis increases with every new piece. Plus there is the added pleasure of thinking that each time I read him, some arrogant, atheistic libtard's head explodes.

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 10:36 AM (FvdPb)

115 i think the jews have a good angle on that. as much or more of religious life is at home with family and friends, celebrating life and living with God.
Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at April 05, 2015 10:34 AM (Cq0oW)

???

Most Jews I know are sipping their morning coffee, reading the NY Times, and praying to the G-D of progressive ideas. Sigh

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:37 AM (/tNwW)

116 The problem with help Arlene's Flowers is that it fixes the symptom, not the disease. If she beats the wrap, or is compensated for her losses, another gay couple will walk in her door tomorrow and demand she do *their* marriage. And then another. And another. And another. She will have to give up her policy, or close her doors. Such is life in open-minded, caring Progressiveland.

I'm not saying we shouldn't help her - we should - but when it's individual citizens against Leviathan, it doesn't take a fortune tell to see how it's going to end.

Posted by: Brown Line at April 05, 2015 10:38 AM (a5bF3)

117 *sigh* I was born at least a hundred years too late.


Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That




Yeah, 200 years, or better yet, 250 years so I could be present for the events leading up to the Revolution and its aftermath.


Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 10:38 AM (px8hG)

118 observant ones ngu lol

what i mean is, its incorporated within their lives

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at April 05, 2015 10:39 AM (Cq0oW)

119 I find it very difficult to find a place where I fit. I always feel like an outsider

Its supposed to make you feel uncomfortable to be close to the presence of God. Approach it as meeting the king, not easing into a soft chair. Try to find a church where glory to God and His word is the highest goal.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:40 AM (39g3+)

120 Malcolm Lyons, "Tales of the Marvelous and News of the Strange: the first English translation of a medieval Arab fastasy collection" -

This manuscript ended up in Istanbul, and it somehow avoided being translated until now. It is a first draft of several stories that are now in 1001 Nights, and several others that aren't.

(I bought it on Amazon in February when it was announced, but they didn't deliver it until March... so, that was annoying.)

The stories read like capsule-summaries of anime TV series. The prose is breathless ("this happened and they saw that and then that happened and ..."). There is little character-development and there are almost always dei ex machina. The story of "Julnar of the Sea" has the problem that the narrative goes through several main characters - so I start thinking that I'm going to read about Shahriyar and Julnar, and next I'm reading about their son Badr. Aristotle would *not* have approved this one.

The manuscript suffered on its way to the translator. I'm told that the first story, ""The King of the Two Rivers", is pretty well cut up and broken so it doesn't now actually make much sense. Elsewhere every now and again we run across "Lac." for "Lacuna".

As to the translator, he seems to have done okay (I don't have the manuscript so I don't know) but there are some odd decisions here: like Qadi is left alone (it's a judge); Fustat.

They're all of different sorts. Some stories are amusing: "The One Eyed Man" just cannot get a break, "The Glass-Seller" counts chickens before they hatch, and "the Man Whose Lips Were Cut Off" despite the title is hilarious. "Talha, the Son of the Qadi of Fustat" is a romance. Probably the best stories are the adventure-stories, where heroes enter remote locations and fight off robots and monsters. If you're writing Pathfinder campaigns, "Four Hidden Treasures" is where you want to mine for material.

Sometimes women are treated well as in "Talha"; sometimes they're deceitful villains; mostly they seem to be here to please Arab mens' fantasies. "The Forty Girls", for instance... this one goes to forty. (Don't read these to your kids.) Christians - for some reason - come out better. It seems that at the time, Arabic-speakers in Syria and lower Egypt were still mostly Christian, and so the storytellers couldn't be complete bigots about it.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 10:41 AM (AVEe1)

121 IF I WERE A CARPENTER

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjFRLOktHXo

Posted by: MachiasPrivateer at April 05, 2015 10:41 AM (EMi53)

122 Part of what troubles me about the Washington state thing, besides the obvious, is since when has it been a DA's job to *sue* people? I thought they were supposed to press charges if there was a crime. The WA DA has made herself no different than those accident attorneys on TV. *That* is almost as bad a precedent as the case itself.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 10:43 AM (GDulk)

123 Most Jews I know are sipping their morning coffee, reading the NY Times, and praying to the G-D of progressive ideas.

Perhaps there's a connection between these two things: the idea that religion is just being home and loving each other instead of God... and abandoning everything you believe in for leftist cant.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:43 AM (39g3+)

124 Sorry, but the presence of 'If You Were A Dinosaur' pretty much proves that the award system is horribly broken. That would be embarrassing in an eighth grade English class at an all-girl's school, much less going for the same awards that the luminaries of classic SF were considered for.

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 10:44 AM (oVJmc)

125 Reading the Robert Lumley (of Necroscope fame) series of Cthulhu mythos stories featuring protagonist Titus Crow. Truly excellent, as any fan of Lumley would expect. A masterful use of language, and as mandatory with any mythos text, the adjectives, my God the adjectives.

Posted by: Blacksheep at April 05, 2015 10:44 AM (bS6uW)

126 Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:37 AM (/tNwW)

Hey!

This Jew is trolling DailyKos and plotting the overthrow of the editorial board of the NY Times!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:45 AM (Zu3d9)

127 Kentucky Fans Light Fires in the Street After Final Four Loss to Wisconsin

Nice?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:45 AM (/tNwW)

128 It seems that at the time, Arabic-speakers in Syria and lower Egypt were still mostly Christian, and so the storytellers couldn't be complete bigots about it.

Or they took the Koran seriously when it called Christians "people of the book" who were to be treated with respect and honor for "almost being right" as Muhammad basically put it.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:46 AM (39g3+)

129
Hey!

This Jew is trolling DailyKos and plotting the overthrow of the editorial board of the NY Times!
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:45 AM (Zu3d9)

Happy Passover Landsman. Hey get this. My ultra liberal Uncle was offended last night that my ultra liberal sister brought non-kosher for Passover beer to the Seder. I just laughed

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (/tNwW)

130 HP Lovecraft is a perfect example of how the "rules" of writing are there to be broken, once you've learned them well and honed your craft. Objectively he's a terrible writer who does almost everything wrong, but the end result is immensely compelling and memorable.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (39g3+)

131 If she beats the wrap, or is compensated for her losses, another gay couple will walk in her door tomorrow and demand she do *their* marriage. And then another. And another. And another. She will have to give up her policy, or close her doors. Such is life in open-minded, caring Progressiveland.

The only strategy to beat them is to *say* you'll do the wedding, then don't. Don't mention religion. People get sick and she'll get a nasty, lispy Yelp review.

Passive-aggressive strategy -- which is my interpretation of what Jesus meant when he said to turn the other cheek.

Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (xQX/f)

132 I've been going through my stacks trying to eliminate books I no longer need or cherish. One nice side effect of the winnowing has been reacquainting myself with books I haven't read in a long time. My future re-read list includes:

"How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming" by Mike Brown, the astronomer who discovered the so-called Tenth Planet, Eris (!), and the demotion of Pluto to just one of myriad Kuiper Belt Objects. Very funny book.

"The Bloody White Baron: the Extraordinary Story of the Russian Nobleman Who Became the Last Khan of Mongolia" by James Palmer, about Baron Ungern-Sternberg, a man so violent he is still revered as a god by some Mongols. A sort of real-life Man Who Would Be King.

"The Bad Popes" by E.R. Chamberlin. The book itself is written in High Academese but the contemporary quotes are dishy.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (KH1sk)

133 I read Lumley's story in Lovecraft's Dreamlands setting. Fanfic. Meh.

Lovecraft's Dreamlands generally is reminiscent of the Arabian stories, come to think of it. The "plot" is, really, the main character traipsing across a weird, wonderful and strange landscape (absent the part where he deflowers forty virgins in forty days, I guess).

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (AVEe1)

134 Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 10:17 AM (Ku8O

Okay....full disclosure. I first saw that word in the Asterix comics when I was a wee lad.

And if I ever see them in bookstores I will secretly read a few pages, just because they are wonderful.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:49 AM (Zu3d9)

135 I used to collect books like they were treasures and stare at all the books I had read- yeah yeah I lead a boring life-- now people don't do that. DO they stare at their iPads?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:50 AM (/tNwW)

136 Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (/tNwW)

Cognitive Dissonance for the win!

For the first time in years we did not have my ultra-liberal idiot aunt at the Seder.

It was strangely peaceful.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:51 AM (Zu3d9)

137 SUpposedly the author/artist of the Asterix books came out of retirement to do a comic inspired by the Charlie Hebdo killings but I don't know what's come of that.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:51 AM (39g3+)

138 If she beats the wrap, or is compensated for her losses, another gay
couple will walk in her door tomorrow and demand she do *their*
marriage.


Stop doing weddings.

The gofundme money can pay any damages without losing the shop or her home, and she can just put a sign in the window that says 'No Weddings.'

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 10:52 AM (oVJmc)

139 Nevergiveup, wouln't beer be pretty much the definition of not kosher for passover? Just realized, I'm not clear on how wine squeaks in as okay ( not that I'm complaining) since it uses yeast and is fermented too.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 10:52 AM (GDulk)

140 For all you old fogeys!

https://youtu.be/FHSDEjZeU3Y?t=2m20s

Posted by: MachiasPrivateer at April 05, 2015 10:53 AM (EMi53)

141 Nevergiveup, wouln't beer be pretty much the definition of not kosher for passover? Just realized, I'm not clear on how wine squeaks in as okay ( not that I'm complaining) since it uses yeast and is fermented too.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 10:52 AM (GDulk)

Pretty much. I am sure there must be a way to make a Beer facsimile for passover but it would probably taste like piss.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 10:54 AM (/tNwW)

142 I suspect weddings are a pretty huge part of a florist's income, so not doing any would be pretty self destructive. My response would be to do weddings by special appointment only. Turn it into an exclusive specialty thing, doing only the weddings you choose to.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:54 AM (39g3+)

143 " ... but when it's individual citizens against Leviathan, it doesn't take a fortune tell to see how it's going to end."

Re the florist in Washington, et al: They can combat the Leviathan by playing their own game. The game, of course, is by making rules upon rules. Of course, the SJWs will adapt their tactics, so you make so many rules that no one can comply with them all. Then, when you find out it's a client you don't want to serve, you can whip out your Policies and say "Sorry." Then sue them.

(I know - this emulates the Civil Rights bad guys with their "literacy tests" at polling places - and it wouldn't be a principled win - but hey.)

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 10:57 AM (r5Qcm)

144 So my brief Bible synopsis of this Easter thing for Christians, it was the upgrade for Judaism 2.0.

A mystery for eons, JC was the perfect lamb, so those passovers are not necessary, and Jew and Gentile alike have JC at the right hand of God, ever living to make intercession for the saints, his brethren.

So like Wi-Fi everywhere, access is directly available, no feasts or high priests, just a spiritual connection. Even the monthly cable bill tithe is not required, but self reliance is suggested.

Calvin, Luther, etc. made other upgrades, mostly a sort of net neutrality thing after some dark ages. But Guttenberg probably did as much as anyone, moving us toward easy access, and renaissance. Building on that, our founders studied and later limited government, and limited the power of the church, while also protecting personal belief. They'd seen what Kings and Popes could do.

Despite the noise generated by a few Soros trolls, the good news is everywhere in this info age, and life is good. We are not so DOOMed after all. Thanks Jesus. lol

Happy Easter

Posted by: Illiniwek at April 05, 2015 10:58 AM (QGjci)

145 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:54 AM (39g3+)

And then Christianity in America will be doomed.

Do not become crypto-Christians.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 05, 2015 10:58 AM (Zu3d9)

146 SUpposedly the author/artist of the Asterix books came out of retirement to do a comic inspired by the Charlie Hebdo killings but I don't know what's come of that.

Obelix threatened to drop his menhir on him if he did anything that stupid so late in life. Dude totally does need that kind of hassle in his autumn years.

Posted by: Blacksheep at April 05, 2015 10:59 AM (bS6uW)

147 Yes it is true, despite Twain's fascinating humor, he was a pain in the ass. After a few turns of family misfortune and financial failure, he got to be just about the model of the modern major liberal. Of course he was still funny and brilliant, which ought to be an example to others but somehow isn't.

My strongest memories of Connecticut Yankee are how dark some of the passages were (not an eclipse joke, oops spoiler). IIRC the narrator's account begins and ends with him surrounded by rotting corpses, in armor. And a machine gun, so Gun Thread After 100.

Naturally there is not a first-rate American smartass since Twain who has not totally appropriated his world-view, I'm going to say especially PJ O'Rourke and Dave Barry, who are very clever fellows but wouldn't be without aping Twain. You can certainly see him in Vonnegut et al too, though not as studiously.

Not anything new, but if you like Twain's nastier moments you'll love Ambrose "Bitter" Bierce, a similar guy who just always went too far. And, historical anomaly: Twain's editor -- if he could be said to have one and he hated them unreservedly -- was William Dean Howells, the Dean of American Letters, who used to be known in modern and cynical circles for just one quote. I have never seen that quote during the Age of the Interwebz, and believe it has been excised from the literature.

Here it is: "Ohio's artists must leave Ohio. Ohio kills her artists."

Posted by: Stringer Davis at April 05, 2015 10:59 AM (xq1UY)

148 Re: the 25 most "homoerotic" relationships in literature.

I have written two characters in the 'Worlds Apart' series so that their relationship could be construed as homoerotic; but I have deliberately left it ambiguous because "are they or aren't they" is so very much more interesting than "Yes, they are."

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at April 05, 2015 11:00 AM (4YKBD)

149 Kentucky coach John Calipari will be elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame while Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan did not receive enough votes to get in, sources told ESPN.com on Sunday.

ESPN.com

Great timing?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 11:01 AM (/tNwW)

150 Perhaps most of the gay revisionist history is crap, but I'm forcing my way through Moby Dick now: gay, gay, gay.

Queequeg and the narrator are queerer than the ladies locker room at Planet Fitness. Plus, the book is completely overrated. Herman Melville may have been the first hipster. Although it will probably be the last thing I do, I WILL finish this gay, sarcasm drenched book.

Posted by: adolfo_velasquez at April 05, 2015 11:01 AM (DkXQB)

151 "Ohio's artists must leave Ohio. Ohio kills her artists."

So, you're saying, I shouldn't move to Ohio in two weeks?

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at April 05, 2015 11:01 AM (4YKBD)

152 Look people,

You can't support these bigot homophobe xenephobe ppl.

They need to fall in line. We can't have people walking around, dissenting all over the place. Who is going to clean that up?

What will that lead to, people thinking for themselves?

CAN U IMAGINE???

Posted by: biscuits mahoney at April 05, 2015 11:01 AM (ywJUM)

153 My response would be to do weddings by special appointment only.

I've argued before that these specialty crafts like cake decorating and flower arranging fall into artistry. The artist has always had the power to accept or reject a commission. Artists had freedom.

I hate the so-called progressives.

Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 05, 2015 11:02 AM (xQX/f)

154 I've read 34 of the books on the top 100 list and quite a few more of them are on my to read list.


I really like "The Girl With All the Gifts" (#4 on Ace's to read list). It was an interesting twist on a zombie tale.


Current read is "Golden Sun" the second book in the Red Rising trilogy.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at April 05, 2015 11:05 AM (KuU4f)

155 Part of what troubles me about the Washington state thing, besides the obvious, is since when has it been a DA's job to *sue* people?

My guess is that the DA is a social justice terrorist, and therefore unconstrained by moral or ethical considerations, either professional or personal, whose goal is the suppression of unbelief wherever it might be found. By any means necessary.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 11:05 AM (Ku8O8)

156 Okay....full disclosure. I first saw that word in the Asterix comics when I was a wee lad.

Heh. Me, too.

My older sister read them to me from the original French versions, explaining the jokes that don't translate well. I've always loved them.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 11:08 AM (Ku8O8)

157 @151 Arggh contraire. I've known any number of Ohio artists I was happy to see leave. And most of those killings needed done IYKWIM. In some cases, it was self-defense, since so many artists have tried to kill Ohio.

Not being "one of hers," Ohio will probably shower you with grant money.
Or hayes money, or garfield money.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at April 05, 2015 11:10 AM (xq1UY)

158 Ohio will probably shower you with grant money.
Or hayes money, or garfield money.

#golfclap

Posted by: Captain Whitebread, Native Kentuckian at April 05, 2015 11:12 AM (rJUlF)

159
So my brief Bible synopsis of this Easter thing for Christians, it was the upgrade for Judaism 2.0.
Posted by: Illiniwek




Zoroastrianism XP

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 11:12 AM (kdS6q)

160 Listened to The Riddle-Master of Hed (Riddle Master #1) by Patricia McKillip, which I had read many years ago. Young man with destiny, evil stuff going on, yada yada. Beautiful writing, she really has a way with that word thing. Pretty good story, ends on cliff-hanger. The entire trilogy is about $14 on kindle so will pick that up.

Read Citizen of the Galaxy by Heinlein, one of his YA titles. Young man grows up in poor circumstances on some far flung planet. Starts a bit slow but gets more and more intriguing as it goes along. Pretty good.

Did the Sad Puppy thing so apparently will get some books to read, hope they're good, give me an excuse to catch up on the latest doings in the Dresden Files.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 05, 2015 11:12 AM (x+P8L)

161 Also, my kids read all of the Asterix books. Now as an adult, my daughter has an Asterix bumper sticker on her car.

How cool is that?

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 11:15 AM (Ku8O8)

162 Sara Hoyt: "To be asked for civility from the side that's been emptying the slops bucket on our head ever since their favorites didn't get the call is all too precious and rich. The people who were screaming at us that 'Women are allowed to write science fiction too' apparently didn't notice the women on this side and on the ballot (I know, we're wrongwomen and wrongfans.) And the idiots who for years have said that this was all because Larry wanted a Hugo owe him a giant apology. Until I see that I'm all out of f*cks to give about their precious hurt feelings." http://bit.ly/1IAFWc1

The lady really has a way with words. (H/T Instapundit)

Posted by: doug at April 05, 2015 11:16 AM (9teY/)

163 107

One observation, Sad Puppies is a case of social media working *for* us. We don't have to let the Statists have it all their own way even though they certainly do have more experience at gathering a crowd.whipping up a mob
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 10:32 AM (GDulk)

fixed

Posted by: The Truth, the whole Truth etc. at April 05, 2015 11:16 AM (6jKOp)

164 160 Read Citizen of the Galaxy by Heinlein, one of his YA titles.
Young man grows up in poor circumstances on some far flung planet.
Starts a bit slow but gets more and more intriguing as it goes along.
Pretty good.


Posted by: waelse1 at April 05, 2015 11:12 AM (x+P8L)



That is one of my favorite Heinlein books and one of the first ones I got for my Kendle.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 11:16 AM (wlDny)

165 The lady really has a way with words.

I think I'm in love.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 11:18 AM (AVEe1)

166 good morning all

Posted by: chemjeff at April 05, 2015 11:18 AM (2XMpf)

167 Read Citizen of the Galaxy by Heinlein, one of his YA titles.

There's a graphic novel version I've been reading that's enjoyable. I'll have to get the book.

Posted by: Captain Whitebread, Native Kentuckian at April 05, 2015 11:18 AM (rJUlF)

168 The Hugos. This year is gong to be fun. These SJW types are *already* planning "no award" votes purely because they don't like the politics of the people who supported the nomination of the works. Assholes.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 11:21 AM (Edob3)

169 Kentucky coach John Calipari will be elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame while Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan did not receive enough votes to get in, sources told ESPN.com on Sunday.

ESPN.com

Great timing?
Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 11:01 AM (/tNwW)

And giving to Arlene's Flowers will make anyone who has any sense of justice feel better. Since I know that Harrison's hot mic comment last night, calling Frank Kaiminsky of Wisconsin "F#%k that N(*&&er, will be and is being just fluttered away by Kentucky, ESPN and the media as a big nothing. Or even more infuriating, that Harrison has a RIGHT to say that about Kaminisky, because Harrison is black and Kaminsky is white and deserves it. Because slavery and racism and all that.
Nothing will come of Harrison's comments. Had Kaminsky said such a thing, the social media sites would have been on fire, he would have received death threats, half a dozen corporations would have threatned to boycott the champiionship game, Indiana would be called racist for not banning Wisconsin from the game, and Al and Jesse would be leading the protest on the steps of Lucas Oil stadium Monday night.

Posted by: Jen the original at April 05, 2015 11:21 AM (PfWwQ)

170 102
re: The Hugos

A backgrounder by a guy in a dress:

io9.com/the-hugo-awards-were-always-political-now-theyre-only-1695721604

And a cri by the man who destroyed the SFWA, with much boo hooing in the comments:

whatever.scalzi.com/2015/04/04/a-note-about-the-hugo-nominations-this-year/
Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 10:30 AM (kdS6q)


Scalzi used to be quite popular with politically right-leaning readers because his stuff was good (Old Man's War) and his politics were generally unknown but not seemingly hostile. But he got famous and decided to shit on all of us the past few years. Reap the whirlwind, bitch.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 11:22 AM (Edob3)

171 @150 Herman Melville may have been the first hipster.

You think you are joking but you are not. I've heard rumors he was the Stud Hoss of Brook Farm. Go forth and read up on his doings around 1850 to realize what a great truth you have spoken. We'll be expecting a book report, too.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at April 05, 2015 11:22 AM (xq1UY)

172 My response would be to do weddings by special appointment only.

I've argued before that these specialty crafts like cake decorating and flower arranging fall into artistry. The artist has always had the power to accept or reject a commission. Artists had freedom.

I hate the so-called progressives.
Posted by: SE Pa Moron at April 05, 2015 11:02 AM (xQX/f)


I wonder if a simple "Imposition Fee" would be legal.

To wit: if your wedding/event is something that I find morally/personally objectionable - examples: gay wedding, marriage between a guy and a horse, two hookers and a turtle-

I will, since forced by law, provide the service but you will pay me a very large fee for the privilege of me providing your service against my will.

And make it part of the contract. Pre-paid, of course.

An Imposition Fee of $2000-$5000 ought to do the trick.

And for those nut jobs who actually pay the IF, well, you can contract out the actual service to another florist, baker, etc.

Win-Win-Win.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 05, 2015 11:23 AM (KUa85)

173 Blacksheep:

I recently read those Brian Lumley stories about Titus Crow, too. They're good "occult detective" stories . . . but they're not really Lovecraft stories. Other than some name-checks of stuff from Lovecraft's work, the tone is much more like Dennis Wheatley's work or Wellman's "John Thunstone" series.

My beef (ironically, considering the day I'm writing this) is that you can't do a Lovecraftian story in a universe with God in it. And Lumley's stories do seem to have a divine moral order in them. Bad guys screw up and get destroyed and dragged off to Hell, good guys catch lucky breaks.

I always thought Lovecraft was so effective because there was no divine moral order in his stories. Go poking around in forbidden knowledge, even with the best of motives, and you can awaken some Bad Stuff that will eat you even if you're virtuous. Lumley's stories still have the last-minute save by Providence.

I'm not saying he's a bad writer, by any means. The stories are entertaining and well-written. Just buyer beware: they're more conventional occult detective stories than Lovecraftian fiction.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 05, 2015 11:24 AM (UukBu)

174 BTW, all the angst over nominating slates in the Hugos?

Scalzi started that back in 2006. Now he's butthurt about it.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 11:27 AM (Edob3)

175 Our family Bible is a Douay edition that Mrs. JTB brought with her. Can someone recommend a good version of the original King James Bible that doesn't have all the modern stuff (I'm being polite) substituted? It would be interesting to compare the two.

Thanks for the suggestion about reading passages aloud. There is much literature that benefits from reading aloud such as Shakespeare and even Poe's poetry but I never thought of it for the Bible.

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 11:27 AM (FvdPb)

176 130 HP Lovecraft is a perfect example of how the "rules" of writing are there to be broken, once you've learned them well and honed your craft. Objectively he's a terrible writer who does almost everything wrong, but the end result is immensely compelling and memorable.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 10:48 AM (39g3+)
*********
I dare you to repost that at night, when cooth is active

Shadow over Innsmouth is his best work imho. Only Obama is better at creating a sense of dread, disgust, despair, horror at the level people can sink to. But he does it unintentionally.

Posted by: Sunni LeBeouf at April 05, 2015 11:28 AM (cIoI4)

177
The Hugos. This year is gong to be fun.
Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer




Reminds one of the good old days of the Scientologists buying up armloads of memberships to paper the house for the L Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future series and the Battlefield Earth movie.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 11:28 AM (kdS6q)

178 Yes, reading the King James Bible is good for developing English language literacy. Shakespeare is written in Kind James English. The King James Bible was required reading as I was growing up, and even though I do not consider myself a Christian, it has been most helpful in critiquing literature. The cultural references to Christianity are part of our heritage, and it is worth being familiar with it. As far as NOT being a practicing Christian goes, it is worth noting that our Western ideals of charity, love, concept of morality is greatly informed by Christianity. So significant is its influence, I would assert that if anyone is born and raised in a Western culture, one may not be a Christian, but one certainly thinks like one. Our values and the way we think is a blend of Christian and Greco-Roman philosophy. The idea of separation of church and state and faith tempered by reason - all part of Western tradition.

As far as Scientology goes, I wouldn't be so quick to alienate them. No, one need not be a Scientologist, but bear in mind that most are conservative-libertarian leaning politically, and they firmly believe that people are responsible for their own condition in life. They believe that being prosperous is a good thing, and they do not look down on people for being rich and successful. They strongly support the principles of freedom, private property rights, and the concept of freedom of association. They are allies against the creeping collectivism of the left. I would not be too quick to alienate them. They are also staunch defenders of religious freedom. Yeah, they attack their enemies, but maybe they have needed to.

Christianity was once considered a cult by the Roman Empire, and Christians were attacked for their beliefs. Mormons were attacked and killed as well.

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 11:29 AM (2/oBD)

179 Wa St Atty Gen is Bob Ferguson. He oozed out of Seattle and hunts grandmas in his spare time.

Posted by: Man from Wazzustan at April 05, 2015 11:31 AM (uPxUo)

180 Zoroastrianism XP


Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix

You lost me there ... but I found it interesting that at least one branch of the Zoroastrians was pretty good at astronomy. They saw the planets moving oddly, not like the other stars. Some planetariums have shown 9/11/3BC as a likely date based on conjunctions. Of course it doesn't prove Jesus, but it might mean Herod (?) fixed special emphasis on killing a bunch of young kids based on their star gazing.

Posted by: Illiniwek at April 05, 2015 11:31 AM (QGjci)

181 By the way, John C. Wright did the ultimate takedown of Swirsky's "If You Were A Dinosaur" story: he sat down one afternoon and in something like three hours wrote a much better story on the same theme. It's called "Queen of the Tyrant Lizards."

It's posted on his blog here: http://www.scifiwright.com/2014/11/the-queen-of-the-tyrant-lizards/

Or you can buy his collection "The Book of Feasts and Seasons."

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 05, 2015 11:31 AM (UukBu)

182 The problem with these SJW SMOFs is that they are most concerned with *who* wrote what (more specifically, who likes them) than with *what* was written.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 11:35 AM (Edob3)

183
Upcoming:The Los Angeles Festival of Books April 18th and 19th. Relocated from their original home on the UCLA campus Altiplano to the ISIS control territory of USC. Protip: Don't go for a stroll off campus.

Outside events are free, the inside events require tickets. Available online for a nominal fee starting on the 12th, or for free on site on the day of the event where available. But of course there are the Westside mandatory Super Deluxe Wash packages for the heeled.

Check the schedule to see if there's something you really want to see.

http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 11:38 AM (kdS6q)

184 @170 Scalzi used to be quite popular with politically right-leaning readers because his stuff was good (Old Man's War) and his politics were generally unknown but not seemingly hostile. But he got famous and decided to shit on all of us the past few years. Reap the whirlwind, bitch.

I feel exactly the same about Barry Eisler. I really enjoyed his John Rain novels. They were essentially apolitical. After a while the author website went far left, but the books were still OK.

Finally, he started to politicize the novels. This was noted in his Amazon reviews and I suspect that a lot of us stopped buying. Some more recent reviews suggest that he may have learned his lesson, but I am not sure that is the case.

Posted by: doug at April 05, 2015 11:39 AM (9teY/)

185 #173 Trimegistus

Exactly right. No God and no divine order is the main creepiness that underlies all of the other creepinesses in Lovecraft's stories.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 11:39 AM (Ku8O8)

186 Thirty-six out of the 100 for me.

Agree 100 % about the Flashman series; read them all as they came out, and several rereadings over the years. Brilliant use of a minor character from Tom Browns School Days, fitted into the interstices of historical events. And very funny, too.

Girl With All the Gifts was an interestingly different take on zombie stories; though most of the characters were cardboard caricatures, the zombie kid and her teacher were fleshed out enough to be sympathetic. Some of the other common flaws of modern literature were present as well, like ignorance of science, but I was able to finish it.

The past weeks rereading (I am keeping away from the library for new books until I finish a couple of projects) has included Chesterton's glorious The Man Who Was Thursday (which Mrs. Eez picked up as I was finishing, and is enjoying hugely) and Ayn Rand's Anthem, which I wanted to read after Ira Levin's This Perfect Day by way of comparing the two similar visions of collectivism. Bedtime reading has been Shelby Foote's The Civil War for a couple of weeks now.
Used bookstore find of last week: Steam Bird by Hilbert Schenk, a hilarious tale of the first (and last!) flight of a nuclear reactor / steam turbine powered strategic bomber. The short story Hurricane Claude in the back was good, too.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at April 05, 2015 11:40 AM (go6ud)

187 The i09 Hugos/Sad Puppies article appeared even-handed, but that was only in tone. It focused on an at least partial red herring of "too much literary, not enough popular" and referenced N. K. Jemison as "all you need to know" about racism/sexism/etc. in SF. Sad Puppies if proof that neither is wholly true, but that this focus has created a mirror image of the issue (one in which the SJW contingent is smotheringly oppresive) and that actual fans are tired of outside societal politics in a realm that should be (to borrow a phrase) a "safe place" from all of that.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 11:40 AM (Edob3)

188 I read an interesting piece on The Blaxe about how Christian businesses can move forward in the current climate of enforced association. This pastor suggested that Christian bakeries, photograhpers, and florists should have contracts ONLY to privide wedding services with certain churches that they know support their values. The pastor also suggested that churches change their operating mode by only allowing renting out their church for weddings of members of the congregation.This seems like a brilliant way to side-step the current cultural climate and prevent Christians from having to do work that is contrary to their conscience.

While I personally do not care one way or another if same sex couples marry, I do fully believe that no one - ever - should be required to do a job that they do NOT want to do. People do NOT owe their services, labor, or work to anyone. And individual has a right to refuse work for any reason. That being said, perhaps Christians may want to re-think telling people WHY they are turning down a contract. Perhaps they should simply raise their prices to high so as to price themselves OUT of the market for same sex weddings, and perhaps they should also follow the pastor's advice above and have exclusive contracts to only do wedding services with churches of their choosing - ones that support their values.

No one should be forced - EVER - to do work that they do NOT want to do. No one owes their work to anyone. We are supposed to have the freedom of choice when it comes to such things, and if we have ownership of our bodies, we have ownership of the fruits of our own labor (a little John Locke for ya there).

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 11:40 AM (2/oBD)

189 I think RFRA is the wrong way to fight these "you must take pictures, bake my cake, arrange flowers" lawsuits. Use the 13th amendment. Involuntary servitude is illegal and just because you pay someone at the end of the day does not change the involuntary aspect in these cases. It is different than someone walking into the store and buying what is sitting on the shelves already produced.

Posted by: PaleRider at April 05, 2015 11:42 AM (7w/kf)

190 Keeping with the Bible theme, The Ten Commandments, Heston version, is on ABC at 7 eastern tonight. Watching is a family tradition. And it will fill up 4 hours until the Wisconsin victory tomorrow night. (Mrs. JTB is from Wisconsin and I know what side of my bread is buttered.)

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 11:43 AM (FvdPb)

191 Posted by: The Truth, the whole Truth etc. at April 05, 2015 11:16 AM (6jKOp)

Have to admit, that was the phrase I *thought* but I didn't write it because (for the most part) *we* don't *like* being part of a mob. If Alinsky's maxim about doing what *your* group likes is correct, we much prefer to protect (i.e. motorcycle clubs protecting military funereals)and just need practice getting the word out.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 11:44 AM (GDulk)

192 I recently finished reading a book called "Kingdom of the Hittites". It is a non-fiction history book.

-
The first battle about which we know any details was Hittites versus Egyptians at Meggido. The last battle will also be at Meggido. Armeggedon means Mount Meggedo. So they've pretty much got the first and the last sewed up.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at April 05, 2015 11:44 AM (LImiJ)

193 Islamic State extremists at Iraqs ancient city of Hatra destroyed the archaeological site by smashing sledgehammers into its walls and shooting Kalashnikov assault rifles at priceless statues, a new militant video purportedly from the group shows.

Militants attacked Hatra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, last month, officials and local residents said, though the extent of the damage remains unclear as it is in territory still controlled by the Islamic State group.

Destroying History is unforgivable, unrepairable, and an indication of utterly uncivilized behavior and typical of muslim behavior

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 11:46 AM (/tNwW)

194 >>They strongly support the principles of freedom, private property rights, and the concept of freedom of association.

Not really.

They may support the idea in the political realm, but they tightly control the information their members may exchange and the people with whom they may associate.

It's pretty much a cult, pure and simple.

Posted by: Y-not at April 05, 2015 11:46 AM (9BRsg)

195 CBD, et al.
Some of my most treasured book are the collections done by Willy Ley.
Besides writing about space travel and being one of the founding members of the VfR (in before Von Braun) people forget that he also had a degree in Zoology.

One of the books is The Dawn of Zoology, and is about the early understandings of the animal world, from the Bible, through Aristotle and Pliny, to Konrad Geisner, and on from there.
The early works in middle ages and the renaissance leaned heavily on the Bible and Pliny for information, and the Bible had this animal called the "Reem" or "Re'em" that was not identified. Because the Auroch only was left in SE Europe and Poland and were not thought of except as some sort of wild cattle, and everyone knew that there were unicorns somewhere and the bible did not come out and actually list unicorns, the writers conflated the ideas, and the KJ translators picked up the idea.

And I will suggest that anyone who wants a good read pick up a Willy Ley book if you can at all find one. Mine were all published in the 40s and 50's and I don't know if anyone is printing them anymore.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 05, 2015 11:46 AM (t//F+)

196 I read "Going Clear" because it's the first book about Scientology I've seen which covered the history of the church after Hubbard's death.

I can sum up my impressions by saying that Hubbard is about the most likeable person ever associated with that church.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 05, 2015 11:47 AM (UukBu)

197 By the way, John C. Wright did the ultimate takedown of Swirsky's "If
You Were A Dinosaur" story: he sat down one afternoon and in something
like three hours wrote a much better story on the same theme. It's
called "Queen of the Tyrant Lizards."


I considered writing "If You Were a Cocker Spaniel," with lines like "If you were a cocker spaniel, my love, you'd be a cocker spaniel with rockets on your ass and you'd fire deathbeams from your eyes, because that would be awesome."

Posted by: Zap Rowsdower at April 05, 2015 11:48 AM (oVJmc)

198 The first battle about which we know any details was Hittites versus Egyptians at Meggido

That was Egyptians - Tuthmosis III - attacking a Canaanite city. It wasn't Hittite then.

The big battle which you might be thinking of is Qadesh.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 11:50 AM (AVEe1)

199 Posted by: naturalfake at April 05, 2015 11:23 AM (KUa85)

Simpler.... separate the Cake baking, and cake Decorating fee...

And the Cake Decorating fee then becomes both Speech, and Art.

Say you will bake the cake, and even give them the stuff to decorate it themselves, but can an artist be forced into Speech? ie, putting what THEY want on the cake?

Posted by: BB Wolf at April 05, 2015 11:50 AM (qh617)

200 That being said, perhaps Christians may want to re-think telling people WHY they are turning down a contract. Perhaps they should simply raise their prices to high so as to price themselves OUT of the market for same sex weddings,
Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 11:40 AM (2/oBD)

The wedding photographer in AZ that was sued by a couple and by the prog. organization backing them had no idea this was a gay wedding. The lesbian came in and hired the photographer on her own, never disclosing that her "fiance" was a woman. It wasn't until the two showed up at the photographer's studio for either a planning session or "engagement" photos that the photographer told them she couldn't photograph their wedding and refunded their money.

Which is what these people will start doing. We are trying to outwit a symptom of a much bigger problem. We should not have public accommodation laws that are so broad, and include a behavior, not an individuals birth status. Despite having a constitution that enshrines freedom of religion, freedom of association, etc. we now have states which have papered over that with ridiculous laws and regulations rendering that null and void. Add in the 14th amendment, which is now being interepreted by the federal courts as meaning no one can use an personal judgement regarding association, contracts, etc. but must accommodate everyone and and every act and even if a state were to reverse those laws, the Progs at the Federal level will override them.

Art.V is the only out.

Posted by: Jen the original at April 05, 2015 11:51 AM (PfWwQ)

201 I can sum up my impressions by saying that Hubbard is about the most likeable person ever associated with that church.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 05, 2015 11:47 AM (UukBu)


And on Easter, you just summed up my feeling about Jesus, and Christianity..... /smile...

Posted by: BB Wolf at April 05, 2015 11:52 AM (qh617)

202 PA rejects Israels partial transfer of tax funds

PA president angry that Israel took out a third of the funds to pay for services rendered to the Palestinian population by Israel, including electricity, water, and hospital services.

Good- let them fuckin starve

Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 11:52 AM (/tNwW)

203 "I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me even though he die yet shall he live. and he who believes in me shall never die."

John 11:25

Book note-Quoted in Book 3, Chapter 9 of "A Tale of Two Cities" which has a strong resurrection theme as well as that of laying down one's life for a friend.

I endorse people reading Bible even if they don't believe if because -as you note, Oregon Muse,-it has had a huge influence ion Western Civilization and I find it interesting and likely that Shakespeare had a hand in the making of the King James Bible.

I like the picture. Here's a great Easter Hymn-"Christ the Lord is risen today."

http://tinyurl.com/osok4se

Each day Christians can celebrate the sacrifice of Christ on Good Friday and his triumphant resurrection from the dead on Easter Sunday. Christ is in us-our hope of glory. Christ active in the world today!

A Blessed Easter to brothers and sisters in the faith
and a Blessed Passover to the Jewish friends here!

Keep on praying!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 11:53 AM (DXzRD)

204 Militants attacked Hatra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, last month, officials and local residents said, though the extent of the damage remains unclear as it is in territory still controlled by the Islamic State group.

Destroying History is unforgivable, unrepairable, and an indication of utterly uncivilized behavior and typical of muslim behavior
Posted by: Nevergiveup at April 05, 2015 11:46 AM (/tNwW)
---
Send in those U.N. peacekeepers!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 11:53 AM (KH1sk)

205
Elron spent way too much time Going Clear with teenage boys on his yacht.

Also, his SyFy sucked.

Posted by: Soon To Be Dead In Ft. Marcy Park By Suicide at April 05, 2015 11:53 AM (j1tga)

206
Scientology... most are conservative-libertarian leaning politically...Yeah, they attack their enemies, but maybe they have needed to.
Posted by: Mistress Overdone

It's pretty much a cult, pure and simple.
Posted by: Y-not





Severely conservative, in a Synanon "snake thru the letter slot" sort of way.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at April 05, 2015 11:54 AM (kdS6q)

207 "Guns, Germs and Steel" by Jared Diamond is a
favorite of mine. For some reason, some of us on the right don't like
this book - I mean, really don't like it - which I never understood. So
that's my recommendation; if you like history, I expect you to enjoy it.



Happy Easter, all! Christ is risen!
Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 10:19 AM (lHZsI)


Try Guns Sails and Empires by Carlo Cipolla if you can find a copy. Same facts, less narrative, and the political conclusion is secondary to explaining what actually happened.
Cipolla was also a historical economist, so he focused on that, and then tried to understand why societies would not adopt things that would benefit them so greatly.
I have written a lot about what I didn't like about Diamond, but I try to not run down people's choice in reading because I like people to read.

Posted by: Kindltot at April 05, 2015 11:54 AM (t//F+)

208 Anyone read Kevin Williamson's "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Socialism"?

I'm becoming a fan of his writing. E.g., "Richard Nixon was a snake who understood himself as such but had sufficient vestigial conscience to be ashamed of his snakery. When Tricky Dick wanted to spread a nasty rumor about a political rival, he insisted on a few degrees of separation between the deed and himself; when Harry Reid wants to spread lies about someone, he does so from the Senate floor and then laughs about it."

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/416446/down-watergate-kevin-d-williamson

Posted by: doug at April 05, 2015 11:55 AM (9teY/)

209 Christianity was once considered a cult by the Roman Empire, and Christians were attacked for their beliefs. Mormons were attacked and killed as well.

I read that as "Morons were attacked and killed as well."

Although I'm sure that's coming one of these days. Too much independent thought scares the Collective Leftards.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at April 05, 2015 11:58 AM (0HooB)

210 And today's Easter devotional from "Our Daily Bread"

http://odb.org

I am re- reading "The Solitude of Jesus"- Lessons for the 21st century by Wayne Monbleau.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 11:59 AM (DXzRD)

211 Happy Easter to the Horde.

He is Risen.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at April 05, 2015 12:00 PM (0HooB)

212 I'm a long-time lurker here, and a Brit, and if you haven't all read the Flashman books yet, you should do so immediately. They are fantastic, and also wonderfully un-PC.

Those who are interested in military history should also read the author's (George Macdonald Fraser) autobiographical book Quartered Safe Out here, about his time in the Japanese campaign at the end of WWII.

Posted by: Maz at April 05, 2015 12:01 PM (HTQ3u)

213 Here's a great Easter Hymn-"Christ the Lord is risen today."

Thank you FS, I have never heard Wesley's hymn set to that tune before, it's very lovely.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 12:01 PM (Ku8O8)

214 Read A Bridge Too Far by Cornelius Ryan. While some of Ryan's conclusions have been superseded by later scholarship, this is still a good book. He was able to interview many of the survivors and the book is full of various "human interest" stories.

I particularly liked being able to read the German side of the events and see what they thought was going on. The book is mainly focused on the British 1st Airborne Division that was surrounded and destroyed at Arnhem. Operation Market-Garden was mainly a British planned operation and suffered from over-confidence that led to discounting incoming intelligence that did not conform to what the British thought/hoped rather than reality.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at April 05, 2015 12:02 PM (8+0sF)

215 Backwards Boy-The traditional response to that wonderful acclamation "He is risen" I say to you,,

"He is risen indeed"

Happy Easter ti you and Backwards Girl!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 12:02 PM (DXzRD)

216 Ugh. Paradise Lost. Just came across a favorite book of my yoot, "Our World in Space" by Robert McCall and Isaac Asimov, 1974. The frontispiece reads "Exploring the moon in advanced lunar rovers in the late 1980s". Chapters include "Where We Stand", "The Next Steps", "Developing the Moon", "The Moon Colony", "Mars", "Ceres and Jupiter", etc.

Now I'm a sad puppy. Time to get some fresh air.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 12:03 PM (KH1sk)

217 Anna, do you have a blog? :-]

Posted by: Spock at April 05, 2015 12:03 PM (7R5AL)

218 NOOD

Posted by: Y-not at April 05, 2015 12:05 PM (9BRsg)

219 Happy Easter ti you and Backwards Girl!

Backatcha, FS.

What a wonderful belief to have. All manner of good things are associated with it, such as life, love, kindness, empathy and wonder.

I just can't find anything wrong with the fundamental core of Christianity.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at April 05, 2015 12:06 PM (0HooB)

220 Open thread up.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at April 05, 2015 12:07 PM (KH1sk)

221 190
Keeping with the Bible theme, The Ten Commandments, Heston version, is
on ABC at 7 eastern tonight. Watching is a family tradition. And it will
fill up 4 hours until the Wisconsin victory tomorrow night. (Mrs. JTB
is from Wisconsin and I know what side of my bread is buttered.)

Posted by: JTB at April 05, 2015 11:43 AM (FvdPb)


Amazon has that with Ben Hur as a double feature for $8 on Blueray or DVD. You can't beat that price and you can watch it any time you want.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 12:08 PM (wlDny)

222 Watched the old silent Ben-Hur and then the Heston version a few months later. I have to say the silent film is a lot more exciting. The director of the talky one decided that reverence means everything has to be really slow.

One reason the silent is more exciting is the incredibly non-OSHA compliant way they made it: want to show a battle between galleys? Build a couple of replica galleys and crash 'em into each other! Want to show a brutal chariot race? Hitch some horses up to chariots and tell the stuntmen drivers that you'll give a cash bonus to whoever wins the race!

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 05, 2015 12:12 PM (UukBu)

223 Not anything new, but if you like Twain's nastier
moments you'll love Ambrose "Bitter" Bierce, a similar guy who just
always went too far. And, historical anomaly: Twain's editor -- if he
could be said to have one and he hated them unreservedly -- was William
Dean Howells, the Dean of American Letters, who used to be known in
modern and cynical circles for just one quote. I have never seen that
quote during the Age of the Interwebz, and believe it has been excised
from the literature.

Here it is: "Ohio's artists must leave Ohio. Ohio kills her artists."
osted by: Stringer Davis at April 05, 2015 10:59 AM (xq1UY)


Twain had the misfortune to screwed over by his publisher while he was alive, and his editor when he was dead, and to make bad financial decisions while alive, and his misery at his wife's and daughter's deaths are so painful to read.

An interesting note, Bierce hated Twain venomously. Twain had gotten everything Bierce had worked for, and in Bierce's point of view, Twain had not worked for a single lick of it. Their career was almost identical, from birth on the frontier, to the civil war, to moving to the gold fields, to working as a reporter.
But where Bierce put his head down and soldiered on, Twain bumbled, played, and abandoned, was chased out, or dishonorably decamped overnight from what he was working at, and was ever more successful

Posted by: Kindltot at April 05, 2015 12:13 PM (t//F+)

224 #43

The horror that is affirmative action slipped into the field of Science Fiction and Fantasy, where the only thing that should matter is whether it is a good story. Not any more. Now there is an unofficial scoring system that gives a work points for how far the author is from white, male,and heterosexual. This is really understating things. In the SFWA boards there grew a group of loudmouth types who harangued anyone who dared suggest that a hundred years from now the majority of human beings would still identify as men and women whose sexual and romantic interest were confine to the opposite gender, as if culture would magically erase a billion years of evolution.

The Hugo awards, which can mean quite a lot economically to a full-time writer trying to make a living at it, are presented as the collective opinion of the readership but in reality have always been the product of a very insular group of insiders. (The other big name in SF trophies, the Nebula, is voted by the membership of a professional writers' association.) To vote on the Hugos you need to purchase a supporting or attending membership for the World Science Fiction Convention for the year in question. This means you not only have to be a reader of Science Fiction and Fantasy but the sort of person for whom it is a major life focus. I know these people and used to be active among them. Heck, I even helped build the Hugo trophies in 1996, including the one slipped into an episode of Babylon 5.

Over the last few decades fandom, as it's known, has shifted to including more and more people whose primary attraction isn't interest in what the future may bring but acceptance for their deviancy in the here and now. They've always been a group of subcultures within fandom, like the furverts, but now they've sought to dominate and take ownership. The notorious Brianna Wu came right out and said it on Twitter yesterday.

In fandom there is a term. GAFIA. Got Away From It All.

"Whatever became of X? I haven't seen him in years."
"He gafiated."

This generally refers to giving up participation in fandom as a time sink. It doesn't mean you stop reading the books or watching the movies and TV. It just means you no longer devote time to gathering in one place to discuss them or make your vacation plans around the time and location of a big convention. This left fandom to the group of misfits who truly had no other place to go.

To be continued.


Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 12:18 PM (IdCqF)

225 Watched the old silent Ben-Hur and then the Heston version a few months later. I have to say the silent film is a lot more exciting. The director of the talky one decided that reverence means everything has to be really slow.

Yeah, and did you notice the silent version had actual nudity in it? I was shocked to see that in a 1927 film.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 12:20 PM (Ku8O8)

226 Yeah, and did you notice the silent version had actual nudity in it? I was shocked to see that in a 1927 film.

Ooh, you wouldn't like to watch the Tarzan movies from that era.

Roaring Twenties, yo. In olden days a glimpse of stocking was . . .

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 12:22 PM (AVEe1)

227
Francois Fenelon says in the chapter entitled "Lean Towards Him" in "The Seeking Heart" The very moment you feel drawn towards God lean towards him with a heart full of love and trust, Do this while you are driving or dressing or getting your hair done,Turn to him while you are eating or others are talking":

And this made the lawyers and the accountants and the other working people in the congregation laugh today when I mentioned it,,.. "When conversation becomes boring, during a business meeting for instance, you can find a few moments for fellowship with your Father instead of being drained by unnecessary talk."

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 12:23 PM (DXzRD)

228 "Read the Bible" - or if you can't manage that right off, may I suggest, at least, the Gospels?

Blessed Easter, ye bookies.

Posted by: mindful webworker - seek & you'll find at April 05, 2015 12:23 PM (ECUyd)

229 /okay, glimpse of stocking was 1934. JUST beat out the Hays Code.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 12:24 PM (AVEe1)

230 Ooh, you wouldn't like to watch the Tarzan movies from that era.

Somewhere on youtube, there's a clip from an old Tarzan movie that shows Maureen O'Sullivan swimming naked under water.

You could see everything, but not really. Very artistically done, I must say.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 12:26 PM (Ku8O8)

231 Those who are interested in military history should
also read the author's (George Macdonald Fraser) autobiographical book
Quartered Safe Out here, about his time in the Japanese campaign at the
end of WWII.

Posted by: Maz



And Steel Bonnets, about the border wars/raids between England and Scotland.

Fraser also wrote a book called General something (memory lapse) that I haven't read, yet.

Posted by: Retread at April 05, 2015 12:29 PM (px8hG)

232 Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 12:18 PM (IdCqF)

Which episode of B5? I'm gonna go right out and watch it.

Oh, and interesting and informative comment.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 12:30 PM (Edob3)

233 #87

Because the thesis Diamond puts forward is dependent on a beloved lie of the left: that there are no innate congenital differences between ethnic groups that can be linked to their success. This is why the left was driven berserk by 'The Bell Curve.'

But the numbers are plain. After seeking to eliminate every possible distortion of the results, intelligence tests show again and again that certain groups have a higher AVERAGE IQ than others. Any group can produce a genius but that genius is going to be highly constrained if he is born into a culture that has no written language and no interest if the genius originates one for them.

This is just one flaw in the book. Specialist in the field where Diamond dips his toe have far more detailed criticism to offer.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 12:31 PM (IdCqF)

234 Those who are interested in military history should
also read the author's (George Macdonald Fraser) autobiographical book
Quartered Safe Out here, about his time in the Japanese campaign at the
end of WWII.

Posted by: Maz at April 05, 2015 12:01 PM (HTQ3u)

That's been recommended here before, so I got a copy and it is an excellent read, all the more interesting because it happened to the author!

Posted by: Hrothgar at April 05, 2015 12:39 PM (ftVQq)

235 I haven't read any books this week, but I'm still cracking up over "Cooking With Pooh" from the ONT.

https://tinyurl.com/ncb45yu

Posted by: rickl at April 05, 2015 12:41 PM (sdi6R)

236 #232

I forget the exact one but it would be the season after JMS won the Hugo. There is an early scene in Sheridan's quarters, with the camera slowly panning by an end table where the trophy sits. The base is a film reel with still from popular SF and F movies running around the rim. I captured the images from tapes using the Play Snappy device, which was very whizzy at the time. The skylights were made from chopped off flashlights and painted. The Chesney Bonestell backdrop was made from the Silpak material used by a lot of prop houses. I spent a night with Mike Donahue working on those pieces. The prop house whose facilities we were borrowing was also working on props for the Star TrekS9 espisode 'Trials and Tribblations,' which was the 30th anniversary of the franchise. They wanted an homage tot he original series but all of the props were long since stolen or sold off, so they had to be reproduced from scratch.

Since we had a long wait on our mold before the painting could start, we were press ganged (we really tried to resist!) into helping with the molds and painting of phasers, wall intercoms, and other bits needed to recreate the appearance of the old sets.

It was a serious geekgasm night in the days before I had my fill of fandom.

http://www.thehugoawards.org/hugo-trophies/1996-hugo-award-trophy/

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 12:42 PM (IdCqF)

237 Just started The Mote in God's Eye. Last read it in about 1985.

I believe that the Douey-Rheims Bible is the closest English translation of the Bible to the original sources, as it was translated directly from the Latin Vulgate Bible, which was directly translated from the Greek.

Posted by: Sharkman at April 05, 2015 12:43 PM (NqZeU)

238 231 - The GM Fraser book you are trying to remember is The General Danced at Dawn - it's a collection of short stories about British Army life shortly after the end of WWII. Follow up is McAuslan in the Rough, and The Sheik and the Dustbin. All of the stories are good, and some of them are fall-down-laughing-on-the-floor funny.

Posted by: Sgt Mom at April 05, 2015 12:44 PM (95iDF)

239 225 Yeah, and did you notice the silent version had actual nudity in it? I was shocked to see that in a 1927 film.


Posted by: OregonMuse at April 05, 2015 12:20 PM (Ku8O

Those early films had a lot of nudity. The original Weismuller Tarzan film had nudity with Jane swimming naked. Those were all before the Hayes commission started up.
And the irony of that was it was due to the so-called Fatty Arbuckle scandal they created it. And that whole thing was a lie.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at April 05, 2015 12:44 PM (wlDny)

240 Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 12:42 PM (IdCqF)

I have geek envy right now.

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 12:46 PM (Edob3)

241 Finished Champlain's Dream by David Hackett Fischer. Good book. Was interesting to read about Champlain's endless toil in founding New France. If you haven't read any of Fischer's work I recommend starting with Paul Revere's Ride.

Planning on re-reading Moon is a Harsh Mistress while I wait for my voting packet for the Hugo awards.

Posted by: Achilles at April 05, 2015 12:49 PM (TpeIH)

242 Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 12:46 PM (Edob3)

You've also narrowed down your meatspace name to one of two. :8

Posted by: Grabthar's Hammer at April 05, 2015 12:49 PM (Edob3)

243 I've read 45 of the bestselling used books, although some of them I read so long ago that they really need to be reread.

That list of "homoerotic" relationships in literature is crap. No, Jane Eyre and Helen Burns were not secret lovers. It's mindboggling that the writer of that list can't fathom that an emotionally stunted orphan who had never been shown kindness in her life would become passionately, but not sexually, attracted to the first person who offered her love and friendship. Same goes for the claim the LL Montgomery book. The stupid, it burns.

Posted by: biancaneve at April 05, 2015 01:01 PM (Zl68m)

244 Read The Fault in Our Stars this week for my book club. All in all, a good book. The author really understands how teenagers talk and think. The plot was somewhat expected, but the characters all seemed real, and the adults came across as real people (not idiots as is typical in a lot of YA fiction).

Posted by: biancaneve at April 05, 2015 01:04 PM (Zl68m)

245 Wow; Somebody thought Helen Burns and Jane Eyre were lovers?!! That's a level of agenda based nitwiterry (sp) that I hadn't come across before.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 01:05 PM (DXzRD)

246 They also can't comprehend that you could love someone of the same gender without feeling like you need or want to to hop into bed with them,, and they didn't take very seriously that part of the reason Jane loves Helen is because Helen is a noble, Christian soul and someone she admires.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 01:07 PM (DXzRD)

247 I had read the claim about Anne Shirley before, so I guess that means that she was bisexual because she loved and married Gilbert ?!! I can
t even imagine L.M Montgomery's reaction to that.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at April 05, 2015 01:09 PM (DXzRD)

248 Currently reading "The Rise of Rome" by Anthony Everitt and "Superego" by Frank J. Fleming. I think "Superego" was recommended here last week. Liking it so far. The Everitt tome I'm reading dead tree style. Very strange to actually look up a word or phrase myself, so used to ebook reading am I.

Posted by: Tuna at April 05, 2015 01:11 PM (JSovD)

249 #242

No, I am neither Barry Workman or Shawn Crosby. I'm not even sure if Barry is still alive and Shawn is semi-famous for his work and his X-Wing car.

I'm just a friend of Mike's through LASFS who was available for the labor.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 01:26 PM (IdCqF)

250 #242

Actually, figuring out my full name isn't hard. First initial and last name, and I'm the only one on the entire planet to the best I can determine.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 01:27 PM (IdCqF)

251 212
Welcome aboard! Don't be shy.

Posted by: Tuna at April 05, 2015 01:28 PM (JSovD)

252 "As has been observed more than once this past week, the progs have won the culture war and what they're doing now is patrolling the battlefield and shooting whatever survivors are left. "

The hypocrisy of the left is mind boggling. As you and others have pointed out, Bill and Hillary Clinton, and Obama are recent converts towards supporting gay marriage. I would argue that the vast majority of people supporting it, at one time in their adult life would have thought the idea as absurd and laughable (Millennials excluded).

So I get to vilify you if you hold the exact opinion I once had, but for a longer duration.

It reminds me of the one-plus mentality of kids in middle school, where some minor leap in maturity allows them to set themselves apart and mock those who have yet to make the leap.

Do me a favor, shoot me. I don't want to live in a country ruled by sixth graders.

But, I'm not bitter!


Posted by: Levin at April 05, 2015 01:33 PM (6pgRO)

253 I know this is the book thread, but you mentioned Arlene's Flowers here and that is what my comment is about.

I support the RFRA, on free speech grounds. I think that those who oppose it are starting to cross the "indisputable" line of fascism. It's no longer soft-tyranny if you oppose giving someone a voice in a court of law.

With that said, once those bakers and florists get their voice, I hope they lose.

Homosexuality is a sin. I'm just back from Easter Service and I am a Christian and I can point to where homosexuality is referred to as a sin.

But I can also point to MANY other sins, and I can point to the verses that say "if you violate one commandment, you've basically violated all of them," or that "your good works are like filthy rags," and that kind of thing.

Here's the reason why a Christian could have issue with a gay wedding: it's because they aren't only sinning, but they are actively sinning and flaunting their sin, and denying that it's even a sin, etc.

It's not the sin - we all sin - it's the ongoing and "in your face" attitude of it.

To which I would ask the baker (etc.): when you sign a contract for a cake, and the nice couple give you their joint address, do you insist that they sign something to prove that not only aren't the living together, but they are also virgins? Because if they are actively, and here's what it was called until very recently: "Living in Sin," then you had better not sell them that cake.

Because if you DO, then - indeed - you ARE discriminating against homosexuals. You are declaring homosexual sex to be more sinful that sex out of wedlock.

What if they already have a child? Do you deny them their flowers or pizza?

What if the bride is a stripper, and you know that she's a stripper, and she's going to be stripping to pay for that cake?

To claim religious freedom is your right, and RFRA's are definitely necessary.

But the judge should slap you around with the Bible that you swear on, using the words in it to make the case.

People who say that homosexuality isn't a sin are deluding themselves - but they are also missing the point. No Christian church should marry homosexuals... but it shouldn't marry people who are openly living together (and making it clear that sex is part of the deal) either. That stripper has to be told "you gotta stop, or you ain't getting married here."

Ignorance has taken this discussion so far from the Word, it's amazing.

As a Christian your sins are forgiven - but you are expected to stop sinning as "fruits of your new life." If you're not even making the effort... if you are asking to have a homosexual wedding, or to marry the person you are openly living with, etc.

They all should get the same answer.

Our clergy is the issue here. It falls to them to preach this, and they simply will not.

But it is Biblical, and it is the Truth.

Posted by: RobM1981 at April 05, 2015 01:39 PM (zurJC)

254 Do me a favor, shoot me. I don't want to live in a country ruled by sixth graders.



But, I'm not bitter!







Posted by: Levin at April 05, 2015 01:33 PM (6pgRO)


..... or you could get back into the fight. There's always one more thing you can do.

Posted by: TangoNine at April 05, 2015 01:40 PM (x3YFz)

255 #224

In a way, the future becoming the present is what handed
fandom over to the SJW crowd. The internet provided an escape hatch for
the saner portions of the culture.

The only version of fandom
much of the world knows is what they see on 'The Big Bang Theory' but
that is very toned down from the reality. All of the characters as
professionals with serious jobs and non-fannish, more or less, wives and
girlfriends. Outside of sitcoms, such people don't have the free time
required to keep up with the required reading and viewing to keep up,
nor the time required for the other activities. They attend a few cons
over the course of the series but are relative spectators compared to
serious fen.

There was a time when having an interest in SF and F
beyond a level that was easily kept hidden from others was a major
social stigma. (It still is to a certain extent but you have to work
pretty hard these days to get the full experience.) Finding a group of
like minded folks was, well, like discovering this place for a lot of
the regulars. A place where you could say aloud and enthusiastically the
things you could never allow yourself to say almost anywhere else in
your life.

A subset of this group are those who attend the big cons when they aren't local. You might think this is the more functional portion who have real jobs and can afford it but many of them, perhaps most of them, are not in this category. One of the things that drove me away from the club was the endless conversations over dinner in which the person opposite me would wail over the state of their finances and less than five minutes later go into detail about the large debt they planned to take on the travel to a distant city for this year's Worldcon, with enough time before and/or after to play tourist in the region. (One of these people, in a moment of weakness on my part, go me to lend them $1,000 for the purposes of such a trip. That was over a decade ago and I've yet to see a penny back. The last time I saw this person they claimed they weren't sure how to find me. This despite every person on the planet with my surname being a close relative and having the same house phone number for the last twenty years. Oh yeah, and my current primary e-mail address is actually my-first-name @ my-last-name.com, which means any google search will at the least produce the domain that is my namesake.)

As with any outsider group there are degrees of distinction from mundane (as we call it) society. As internet access became more commonplace over the 90s, those better able to fit in within mundane settings had less need to seek out the misfit gatherings. They could get their fix online. Why go to a shitty crime-infested neighborhood for your drug if Amazon will deliver to your door in a plain brown box?

So much of the saner portions of fandom receded from active participation and the full-time freaks became ascendent, believing the larger world of SF and F readers and viewers was theirs to rule over.

They're finding out now that this belief was terribly wrong.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 01:44 PM (IdCqF)

256 Here's Larry,the guy that wrote the Monster Hunter series in his own words.

http://tinyurl.com/n3xaddg

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at April 05, 2015 01:51 PM (KbNXw)

257 Posted by: Man from Wazzustan at April 05, 2015 11:31 AM (uPxUo)

Ah, apologies. I thought I had read "she" in the post and just went with that.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at April 05, 2015 01:51 PM (GDulk)

258 #253

Two things.

First, there is no one owner of Christianity or any other religion. (Though the Scientology folks have tried to apply trademark law in interesting ways.) There are myriad churches with differing priorities. Many of them became more accepting of premarital sex, especially by monogamous couples, as effective birth control influenced culture.

Second, there is a thing called priorities. Some sins are worse than others. Eating all of the ice cream when other were expecting a share is gluttony but is that on a par with eating your way to immobility?

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 01:51 PM (IdCqF)

259 Thanks for the heads-up, Kindltot!

Regarding Diamond, I've seen a lot of the criticisms. "Collapse" struck as preachy, and unabashedly so at the end. I found the parts about linguistics in "Guns" fascinating but I'm odd that way.

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 01:54 PM (8LT/S)

260 Yeah, I gave up TV for four years. Then I got hooked on college football. What's a guy to do?

Posted by: John the Libertarian at April 05, 2015 01:54 PM (Jk/zI)

261 So the Polanski desire to booger little children, or for pagan gang rape of virgins, seem like this base desire of the radical LGBT element. They project the homoerotic into all great literature, or force the more pure Christian baker to bake their gay wedding cake as a mockery of Christian values.

Too bad they can't contain their probing desires to willing partners. Sen. Kirk is now out, saying it's unconstitutional and opens the door for bigotry. Of course, the very few devout bakers that turn down business would need a compelling reason to be forced to join in a ceremony that parodies their belief. Kirk only says Christianity itself is bigotry, apparently. The compelling reason is the LGBTs want to put their face in it.

Posted by: Illiniwek at April 05, 2015 01:57 PM (QGjci)

262 OSP, thank you so much, I have very much been looking forward to the sequel as I enjoyed Amy Lynn.

Posted by: sawhorse at April 05, 2015 02:07 PM (jm3+c)

263 Continue to make donations to Arlene's Flowers so this poor 70 year old grandmother doesn't lose everything she owns. If you want to see the face of cruelty and meanness, go check out Attorney General Bob Ferguson's Wiki and put a face to the oppression of religious freedom. He is, of course, a democrat. He also offered Arlene's Flowers a deal that if they paid a couple grand and promised NOT to do weddings ever again - that's right, "they" decide who gets to do business and who doesn't. He and his ilk are the arbiters of who is allowed to have a business and under what terms they conduct their business.

Here is Mr. Ferguson's wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Ferguson_%28politician%29

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 02:16 PM (2/oBD)

264 A great bulk of those "100 Best-Selling Used Books" look to me like they're off high-school required reading lists.

(Apparently they haven't changed too much in the 25 years since I was in high school, which I take as a good thing for the most part.)

Posted by: I Work for Dick Jones at April 05, 2015 02:20 PM (ZMbDb)

265 You can check out Arlene's Flowers FB page here:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Arlenes-Flowers/179760432044760

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 02:20 PM (2/oBD)

266 For all of it's grand language the KJV translation might as well be Greek for most readers. It's long been superseded by modern, accurate versions that include all the books of the bible, not just those chosen to fit the protestant theological world view.

Posted by: Corgi what ain't a Poi dog at April 05, 2015 02:25 PM (dZGNV)

267
I heartily recommend the "Flashman" novels along w/ Ace - great fun. I just finished "Nearer My God," a book by William F. Buckley Jr. about his Catholicismthat fascinated me, as I am an evangelical Christian who grew upreading National Review.
I've read 18 of the top 100 used books. Regarding TV, I sometimes do an alternation thing where I read 2 paragraphs of a book, then watch 12 lines of dialogue; it helps me because I get bored if I just watchTV,and I find that I get a lot read that way.

Posted by: norrin radd at April 05, 2015 02:25 PM (MXoex)

268 Attorney General Bob Ferguson's office phone number is 360-753-6200. Feel free to call and express your support of the constitutional rights of Barronelle Stutzman, the owner of Arlene's Flowers.

You can also write to Barronelle Stutzman of Arlene's Flowers to offer words of encouragement and support here:

1177 Lee Blvd., Richland, WA 99352.

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 02:28 PM (2/oBD)

269 Those who see queerness in the works of Shakespeare (and everywhere else they look) reveal more about themselves than Shakespeare.

For centuries people have been seeing secret codes in Shakespeare that reveal the Bard was really a homosexual, a woman, a Zoroastrian, a Catholic, a member of the Illuminati or whatever.

People see what they want to see.

Posted by: I Work for Dick Jones at April 05, 2015 02:31 PM (ZMbDb)

270 I think the Revised Standard Version is good as one that Catholics and Protestants can agree on. (As to the text, not the interpretation, obviously).

Posted by: I Work for Dick Jones at April 05, 2015 02:35 PM (ZMbDb)

271 NRSV is pretty awesome if only because they brought in the Dead Sea Scrolls.

I still want an overhauled Jeremiah though. It's best in its original Klingon Greek.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 05, 2015 03:12 PM (W540W)

272 Helen Burns was most likely based on Charlotte Bronte' s oldest sister Maria, who died at age 12 of consumption.
In the book, Jane & Helen clearly share a sisterly affection.

Posted by: @votermom at April 05, 2015 03:15 PM (cbfNE)

273 Y Not

What you are saying about Scientology is simply not true.

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 03:21 PM (2/oBD)

274 Bibleonline(dot)ru is a neat way to read the Bible and learn a language at the same time. Lots of languages; not just Russian.

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 03:35 PM (aQssP)

275 The way I heard it was that King James wanted the Bible to read as artfully as Shakespeare and commissioned writers with similar flair. The resemblance is intentional.

Posted by: Adjoran at April 05, 2015 03:35 PM (QIQ6j)

276 #273

Have you had to deal with Scientologists? They can act very normal when it suits their purposes but are instant batshit insane if you cross the wrong line. And there is no warning. It's a psychosis simmering just under the surface that goes full boil in an instant.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 03:42 PM (IdCqF)

277 Ok, I didn't realize that there was a remake of Ben Hur.

Posted by: lindafell is Cruzin' at April 05, 2015 04:00 PM (xVgrA)

278 274 Bibleonline(dot)ru is a neat way to read the Bible and learn a language at the same time. Lots of languages; not just Russian.

A little while ago, I found a nice interlinear Russian/English bible for my Kindle. The Table of Contents points to http://www.believingthomas.org/ which may, in fact, be where I picked it up (you know how these things go: google, click, download, connection never hangs around long enough to make it to your long-term memory).

It's much more accessible than I expected it to be. if you're learning Russian, give it a go; you may be surprised.

Posted by: Anachronda at April 05, 2015 04:11 PM (o78gS)

279 Donated!

I ask all of you to send the lady a little something and to spread the word to amiable friends who might be likewise moved to help.

Christian marriage is a sacrament, not a custom: not subject to change by heathens.

[see Psalm 2, King James Version]

Posted by: Beverly at April 05, 2015 04:53 PM (5yujP)

280 Learning Russian is for optimists. Learning Chinese is for pessimists. Learning Arabic is for realists.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 05, 2015 04:58 PM (eLZwy)

281 Bruce J

The Scientologists that live in dormitories are the ones that work for the church. It's like joining the priesthood. It's no different from being a priest or a nun. These are people that have dedicated their lives to church, and this is the life they have chosen.

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at April 05, 2015 04:59 PM (2/oBD)

282 Thanks, Anachronda! I'll definitely check it out.

Posted by: FireHorse at April 05, 2015 05:32 PM (VMA3H)

283 #230 Maureen O'Sullivan loses her lionskin falling into the water, but the studio replaced for the swimming scenes with an Olympic woman swimmer named Josephine McKim who could keep up with Weissmuller.

Very healthy young lady.

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at April 05, 2015 05:47 PM (XO6WW)

284 #254 "..... or you could get back into the fight. There's always one more thing you can do."

"Hunh... doin' right ain't got no end." -- 'Redlegs" Terrell, The Outlaw Josey Wales

And the old lady on the porch laughs....

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at April 05, 2015 05:50 PM (XO6WW)

285 #224 #43 (The other big name in SF trophies, the Nebula, is voted by the membership of a professional writers' association.)

Not so much on the professional side anymore. The SJW's and/or CHORF's have long since overrun SFWA. In fact, there's considerable overlap with the CHORF's doing their best to ruin the Hugos.

Neither award has the box-office cachet it once did.

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at April 05, 2015 05:57 PM (XO6WW)

286 161
Also, my kids read all of the Asterix books. Now as an adult, my daughter has an Asterix bumper sticker on her car.

How cool is that?

Super Choutte!

Y sont fous ces Romans!

Posted by: Obelix at April 05, 2015 06:00 PM (ysSRI)

287 Late addendum: For all those thinking the KJV was the originator of all that magnificent language, you should know that it was based largely on the first English translation, that of John Wycliffe, in A.D. 1382-1383. Some of the phrases we know today actually came from his version.

Even more important was the work of William Tyndale, burned at the stake by the Roman Catholic Church for translating the Bible into English. Most of the KJV was lifted directly from Tyndale.




Posted by: Beverly at April 05, 2015 06:10 PM (5yujP)

288 #285

That doesn't change the fact that you cannot vote on the Nebulas by merely buying a supporting membership.

Posted by: Epobirs at April 05, 2015 09:21 PM (IdCqF)

289 And on Easter, you just summed up my feeling about Jesus, and Christianity.....

Yes, Jesus is much better and more likable than any Christian. That's our eternal shame and... well, sort of the point of Christianity, really.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at April 05, 2015 09:39 PM (39g3+)

290 Speaking of the Hugo announcements... it came as something of a surprise to see my name up there. Thanks all you morons that bought The Stars Came Back, helping push me onto the radar of the sci-fi world.

Posted by: Rolf at April 05, 2015 10:22 PM (X1XJZ)

291 Thank you for your excellent post about books. Once again you have brought a little light to a dark world.

Posted by: G.L. Snodgrass at April 06, 2015 03:01 AM (tr1xk)

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